Ramos Gin Fizz Jelly Shots Recipe

Ramos Gin Fizz Jelly Shots
Difficulty: Easy | Total Time: | Active Time: | Makes: 54 shots

Created by Henry C. Ramos around 1888, the Ramos Gin Fizz was first seen at his New Orleans Imperial Cabinet Saloon, but it became a favorite at Ramos’s subsequent bar, the Stag. Getting the proper foamy, fluffy texture from the egg whites in the drink requires intense shaking, so bartenders used to have “shaker boys” to keep up with the demand, especially during busy festivals like Mardi Gras. In this jelly shot version, we skip the egg white and cheat a little by using a blender to whip the cream, citrus juices, gin, and gelatin for the second layer; the first layer is a mix of orange blossom water, orange zest, club soda, and gelatin softened in simple syrup. Once everything has set, the entire jelly block is flipped out of the pan and sliced. Each jelly shot has less than a quarter-ounce of alcohol, so eight or nine jelly shots equal about one Ramos Gin Fizz cocktail.

This recipe was featured as part of our Jelly Shots for Mardi Gras project.

INGREDIENTS

For the first layer:

  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 cup orange blossom water
  • 2 (1/4-ounce) packets unflavored gelatin
  • 2 cups club soda
  • Finely grated zest of 1 medium orange

For the second layer:

  • 1 1/2 cups gin
  • 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons Simple Syrup
  • 3 (1/4-ounce) packets unflavored gelatin
  • 1 1/4 cups heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (from about 2 medium lemons)
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (from about 4 medium limes)
INSTRUCTIONS
For the first layer:

  1. Pour the simple syrup and orange blossom water into a medium saucepan and sprinkle the gelatin evenly over the surface. Let stand undisturbed until the gelatin softens, about 3 minutes.
  2. Place the pan over low heat and whisk constantly, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula as needed, until the gelatin and sugar dissolve and the mixture no longer feels grainy when rubbed between your fingers, about 3 minutes. (Do not let the mixture simmer, or the gelatin will not set properly.) Slowly pour in the club soda, add the orange zest, and stir gently to combine (the mixture will fizz).
  3. Pour into a 9-by-9-inch metal baking pan and refrigerate uncovered until set, at least 30 minutes.

For the second layer:

  1. Pour the gin and simple syrup into a medium saucepan and sprinkle the gelatin evenly over the surface. Let stand undisturbed until the gelatin softens, about 3 minutes.
  2. Place the saucepan over low heat and whisk constantly until the gelatin dissolves and the mixture no longer feels grainy when rubbed between your fingers, about 4 minutes. (Do not let the mixture simmer, or the gelatin will not set properly.) Remove the saucepan from the heat and set aside.
  3. Pour the cream, lemon juice, and lime juice into a blender and blend on high until thickened, about 15 seconds. Add the reserved gin-gelatin mixture and blend until frothy, about 30 seconds.
  4. Remove the pan with the orange blossom layer from the refrigerator. Pour the cream-gin mixture over the orange blossom layer. Return to the refrigerator uncovered until set, at least 2 hours.
  5. When ready to serve, run a knife between the jelly block and the edges of the pan. Being careful not to get any water inside, dip the pan into a sink full of hot tap water, submerging it about halfway up the sides for about 10 seconds. Remove the pan from the water and tilt it: The jelly block should slide away from the edges. If it doesn’t, return the pan to the hot water for another 5 seconds. Invert the jelly block onto a cutting board.
  6. Using a long slicing or serrated knife, press straight down through the jelly block (do not drag the knife through) and cut it into 54 (1-1/2-by-1-inch) pieces. Serve immediately.