4.0 stars out of 5 stars based on 7 reviews
Georgia Faye's Famous Porcupine Meatballs with Sauerkraut

Georgia Faye's Famous Porcupine Meatballs with Sauerkraut

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MEMBER RECIPE

Total Time: 1 1/2 hours (maybe a little more)

Active Time:

Makes: serves 8 normal people (or fewer really hungry folks!!)

I don’t know who passed this recipe on to mom, but it has been made by mom and me for years —as far back as i can remember. It is a savory, satisfying meatball and kraut dish, and the “sauer” is tempered a little by the tomato component. The recipe can easily be doubled, and it freezes well (if there are any leftovers!)

For the ground pork, i just use Jimmy Dean or Bob Evans mild sausage (in the tube). They are very lean, so take that into consideration in the fat content of your ground beef. Usually, I just skip the veal, and use 1 # beef and 1/2 # pork sausage, as noted. Mom loves to use the Winn-Dixie brand of ground pork sausage.

Yield, about 26 medium meatballs (plenty for 6-8 “normal folks”, depending on appetites). I make them a little larger than a golfball. I like the surface-to-inside meatball ratio for the sauce “soak-in” factor.

Cooking tip: when “browning” the meatballs, do NOT let a crust form; turn them (VERY GENTLY) often so they cook all round the outside evenly, and maybe 50% inside, but not all the way through. They will be more tender that way, and retain enough fat and juices to really flavor the kraut. Mom is a jayhawk when I’m cooking the meatballs so that I don’t over-brown or let the crust form! ;-)

Note that the kraut will be moist, not soupy.

Traditionally served with boiled, skinned white potatoes, with Hellman’s mayonnaise on the side (though mom likes Duke’s). I also like it with good cold pilsner or lager! ;-) UPDATE: I am now a Duke’s gal!

This dish freezes very well.

Instructions

  1. 1Mix meat, bread crumbs, onions, peppers, egg, and salt and pepper. Fry up a bite size portion of meat to check and correct seasoning. Add rice and water, and mix all the above ingredients thoroughly.
  2. 2Form meatballs slightly larger than golfballs, and place on wax paper on a cooking sheet. (it is easier).
  3. 3Heat up large skillet with 3T fat (crisco oil is fine), and on medium to medium-high heat, very gently brown meatballs without creating a crust. Don’t heat at too low a heat so the fat soaks in, just stand there and keep watch and keep turning them GENTLY for even heating. remove from skillet. drain on paper towel. The meatballs should NOT be cooked through —maybe 50%—just barely browned, without any “crust.”
  4. 4Pour cans of kraut into a large stockpot with a lid. I like to add the can juices, and I don’t rinse the kraut, either. Gently nestle the partially-cooked meatballs INTO the top layer of the kraut.
  5. 5Pour can of condensed tomato soup over top; don’t stir, but spread as evenly as you can —a rubber spatula is good). Sprinkle/drizzle over that another can of water to help “spread it out” —and give liquid to the bottom of the pot to prevent scorching. This will not result in a “soupy” consistency —merely moist kraut.
  6. 6Cover and cook on medium heat at a medium simmer on the stove for 1 hour. Don’t keep peeking and letting the steamy heat out! But do check as the time goes on for scorching. At one hour, check to see that the meatballs are cooked through (split one to see if still pink). Simmer until done. This long simmer is important to cook through the meatballs and to allow the fat and juices and seasonings from the meatballs to really flavor the kraut.
  7. 7Happy chowdown! Warning, they’re addictive.

Member recipes are not tested by the CHOW food team.

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