What have you made lately? Get great advice
TELL US

Wild Mushroom Crêpes with Red Wine Reduction Recipe

Makes: 4 servings

The mention of the word crêpe brings images of a flambéed dessert with orange sauce or a thin pancake full of ham and cheese. Our crêpe is actually a version of a banh xeo. Banh xeo is a cross between a crisp eggless crêpe, a vegetable wrap and a fluffy omelet, and actually predates the French colonial era in Vietnam.

The filling consists of the bounty of wild mushrooms available during the winter in the Pacific Northwest. The general rule when cooking wild mushrooms is to bring out their natural flavors by sprinkling the mushrooms with the “holy trinity” of salt, soy sauce and a pinch of sugar. After all, you don’t have to try too hard to bring out the flavor of a food that isn’t the least bit timid.

Game plan: The mushroom filling can be made a day ahead and refrigerated.

INGREDIENTS

For the wild mushroom filling:

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 shallot or small red onion, finely diced
  • 1/4 pound chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 1/4 pound lobster mushrooms, cleaned and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 1/4 pound porcini mushrooms, cleaned and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste

For the Pinot Noir reduction:

  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 cup Pinot Noir
  • 10 tablespoons butter, diced and kept cold
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste

For the crêpes:

  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder, Vietnamese or Indian Madras-style
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced (white and green parts)
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1/4 pound radish sprouts
INSTRUCTIONS
For the wild mushroom filling:

  1. In a large sauté pan over medium heat, add the oil. Add the shallot and season with salt and pepper. Sauté until tender but not colored, about 4 to 5 minutes. Add all of the mushrooms and sauté until golden brown and tender, about 10 to 12 minutes. Add the soy sauce and sugar and continue cooking until the soy sauce is almost completely reduced. Taste and adjust seasoning.

For the Pinot Noir reduction:

  1. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the shallot and the wine. Cook until the liquid is reduced to a syrup. Reduce the heat to low. Add the butter, a few pieces at a time, whisking to incorporate each addition before adding more. Work the pan on and off the heat to regulate the temperature so that it does not become too hot. Keep warm.

For the crêpes:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the rice flour, all-purpose flour, kosher salt, granulated sugar, curry powder, green onions, coconut milk and water.
  2. For each crêpe, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in an 8-inch, non-stick pan over medium heat. Add 1/4 of the cooked mushroom filling. Without removing the mushrooms, pour in 1/4 of the batter, between 1/2 and 3/4 cup of the crêpe batter. Quickly tilt the pan in all directions to allow the batter to completely cover the bottom of the pan. Cover and cook for 3 to 5 minutes.
  3. Uncover and check for doneness. The crêpe should pull away from the sides of the pan, be well-browned and lacy on the bottom, and look a bit dry on the top. Place 1/4 of the radish sprouts on top and fold the crêpe over and keep warm.

To serve:

  1. Place crêpes on warm plates and serve with Pinot Noir reduction.

Beverage pairing: Recipes with wild mushrooms are perfect for showing off a good Burgundy-style wine. Pinot Noir is a grape variety that inspires strong emotions; it’s all about sex. There’s just no other way to describe the elusive appeal of the combination of a great Pinot Noir and wild mushrooms. The aromas arouse the senses, stimulate pheromones, and generally pique the sensual side of our nature. Recommended: 2001 Bergstrom, Cumberland Reserve, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, Oregon; or 2001 By Farr, Pinot Noir, Geelong, Australia.

This recipe, while from a trusted source, may not have been tested by the CHOW food team.