Farofa's Profile

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Kids Gone Wild

And yes, i think the staff should intervene. Sometimes i do, when kids are misbehaving in elevators, malls, shops, public transportation, ecc. They're persons, they live in society and must learn to respect others. If theyr parents don't teach them, it's our duty to do it.

Jun 25, 2008
Farofa in Features

Kids Gone Wild

Healthy children are quite simple and straight foreward in their tastes. They enjoy simple food, familiar tastes, and most of them have a restricted repertory of food they really enjoy. Healthy children enjoy eating but, after they finish their food they will want to do something also. Their developing brains aren't still ready to concentrate for too long, and their growing bodies are not ready to sit still for a long time. In a child, everything is about learning, exploring and making new discoveries. The decision of becoming a parent means dedicating part of your life to this small, developing person, so you'll have to make plenty of sacrifices.
You don't own you children. Most of times when you see a kid messing around in a restautrant is because the parents aren't really caring for them. They're tortured kids, being subjected to their parents selfish desires. A loving parent tries hardly to understand how a child feels in every situation, and not to expose their kids to situations with wich they aren't able to cope.Children need limits, but in a measure they cn learn with it. Otherwise, it is cruelty. There are so many kid friendly restaurants, with lots of food children love, activities, playgrounds, other families, ecc. And if you must go to a fancy place where your child won't be able to be a child, hire a sitter or stay home.

Jun 25, 2008
Farofa in Features

Caipirinha

Well, that's quite the spirit... just like martinis, some shake it, some stir it... I prefer mine shaked.
But Rob, I don't know the size of key limes, but they look not very different from our limão galego (Citrus aurantifolia), and I think 4 limes for one glass is too much (it usually takes one lime for each drink, sometimes less). I suggest that you remove the white core frome the lime, because it gets too bitter. The idea is to macerate the limes with sugar, so as to release the aromatic juices from pulp and peel, then add the cachaça and ice. And yes,we keep the lemon pieces in the glass, because it's tastier and that's the way a caipirinha looks like. BTW, "caipirinha" is a female, so the name e means a little country girl!
Another variation (I love it: persian limes and vodka).

Aug 12, 2007
Farofa in Recipes

Ungrateful Wretch

The satsisfaction of the primary instincts, toghether with the need of keeping social bonds, is highly anxiogenic for human beings.So we create rituals to deal with these situations, like wedding rings or table manners. Sharing their food... can you imagine how it made the primitive men and women anxious? Of course ritual is different from culture to culture and changes with times, but some kind of ritual is always needed. The more civilized, the most elaborated and refined the rituals can become (p. e. the japanese tea ceremony, or the orixa food in afro brazilian religion). Contemporary societies sometimes believe they can get away without rituals but it is of great arrogancy to believe you are superior to all those "primitive" people. So, follow the rules, or create new ones...
Something I love about italians: they eat with joy, and praise their food while eating it!

Aug 02, 2007
Farofa in Features

Death by Dinner

Nice... but what about tetraodontiform fish? Japanese fugu, brazilian baiacu (yes, it's eaten here too!). The dangerous yet seductive mix of delightfull taste, psychoactive effects and horrible death by central nervous system paralysis...

Aug 01, 2007
Farofa in Features

Make Your Own Dog Food

When I was a child, we didn't have processed dog food here in Brazil. We had fila dogs, and all their food was homemade. They're really large animals, so the cost of food was an important issue for us. I used to cook big pans of cracked rice or polenta with kidney or minced meat. Bones were an important part of their diet, and they loved it. Our butcher used to keep bones and spare pieces of meat for me and my brothers.
Carrots for vitamin A, fish liver oil, eggs - they like to eat the shells, too, and it's good for them. Dogs enjoy fish, but BEWARE of the bones (risk of chocking). Also, NEVER feed your dog long chicken bones, because if they break, can perforate their intestines and kill them. But the small neck bones offer no danger and dogs love it! I used to cook chicken necks and feet until very tender. They're very rich in calcium, and great for puppies.
Dogs doesn't need vitamin C, they produce their own, so oranges, lemons, ecc. are not good for them. Also, try to keep their diet low in fat.

Jul 24, 2007
Farofa in Features

Just Bought A Bottle Of Cachaca

What bother’s me about some cachaça producer’s like 51and Pitu is that they distribute and export low quality licquor with the excuse “cachaça is like that” - which is not true. Being large companies, they dominate international market but end by giving a wrong idea of what is our national licquor. So, we must count on you, foreign drinkers, to help with the quality control ;-)!

So, if you found a cachaça brand that satisfies you, stick to it. I think the rule is the same for all licquor: a good enough cachaça could be drunk by itself (of course, by those used to strong licquors). If that’s not possible, rather use it to clean your windows (while you don’t have an alcohol powered car... I do!)

What’s special about cachaça is that it’s made only with the fresh garapa (sugar cane juice, which is also a traditional highly energetic refreshment, and is being researched as an athlete’s beverage). This gives cachaça it’s distinctive, peculiar, “green”, “chlorophyla” taste (there are also the aged cachaças, in which this taste is combined and transformed by many others), and makes it very different from other cane licquors like rhum. Btw, if you have to substitute cachaça in a recipe, rather use vodka than rhum, which can be too aromatic.

2 very traditional recipes

Coquinho:
Make 2 small holes on 1 dry coconut (not the green one). Discard the water and fill with cachaça. Fill the holes with pieces of cork and some wax. Let it rest for a week. Serve iced.

Quentão: served at winter nights, like St. Antonios (tonight) and St. John’s (midwinter folk festival)
1. Caramelize 1 cup sugar, add 2 cups water, 2 sticks cinnammon, 2 pieces of ginger root, sliced, 2 limes sliced and let boil until you have a thick syrup. Add 1 liter cachaça. Don’t let it boil (some people do, but I think it looses flavour). Serve hot.

I said before that "caipirinha" is used mostly for citrics, but this is disputed. a better definition is: "caipirinhas" use mashed fruit; "batidas" are blended, or use fruit juice.

Jun 13, 2007
Farofa in Spirits

Rabanada (Brazilian-Style French Toast)

Yes, I like it too... My grandmother's rabanadas are very creamy, and she soaks the bread longer than most people (not as long as 8 hours, but about 1 or 2). Sometimes she adds Port to the milk, which gives a distinctive "richer" taste.

The traditional recipe is much simpler. Just like portuguese Fatias Paridas or french Pain Perdu, it uses just bread, milk, eggs, oil, cinnammon and sugar. What I enjoy about Aïdas Rabanadas is how brazilian they are! Not joking: our cooking is creative, multicultural, eager to incorporate new ingredients and mostly free of prejudices (sometimes we exagerate, but that's another story).

We love sweet condensed milk. In so many traditional recipes (like Arroz Doce or Pudim de Pão) it now substitutes plain milk, and many people doesn't even know how they were made before condensed milk existed.

An we love also chocolate. If something is good, may be better with chocolate. I'll try the cocoa version next time.
By the way, some families serve their's with orange or Port syrup. I made some very good ones substituting part of the milk for coconut milk, which may be perfect with the cocoa powder.

Rabanadas are mostly a dessert, served at the large Christmas eve's buffet. The leftovers become creamier and are a special treat at Christmas morning breakfast table. (my family usually makes more rabanadas and hides a plate, to ensure that there WILL be leftovers) .

By the way... that's what we leave for Papai Noel (Santa Claus) rabanadas and a glass of Port.

Jun 13, 2007
Farofa in Recipes

Wow, You Eat a Lot

Top model Giselle Bündchen is know for enjoying her food and eating a lot. She's proud to say "I eat like a horse".
Knowing how important she is as a role model for millions of girls all over the world, Giselle does her part in preventing eating disorders. Last week in Brazil she was shown eating 2 pieces of chocolate cake for dessert (after a very good meal), and said that she keeps fit by working out.
It is something so old fashined to think women should pretend to be something "out from this world". As if we wren't "material girls"! We must teach the new generations that lovely women are the ones who enjoys themselves, eating well, exercising their bodies and minds, loving and being loved.

Jun 07, 2007
Farofa in Features

what FOOD is associated with history? or perhaps a piece HISTORY associated with food?

Pizza Margherita was created to honour Queen Margherita of Svoy. It has the colours of the Italian flag: white cheese, red sauce, green basil leaves

May 30, 2007
Farofa in Not About Food

Good friends bad cooks...advice needed.

I have this old friend which is such a bad cook, but she doesn't think so. As a close friend, I can tell her almost everything - for instance, when she doesn't look good, if she gained too much weight or when she's wearing something that makes her look older. I know I could even tell her that her children were ugly (but it's not true, the two cute little boys became such handsome young men...). But she's really so sensitive about her cooking! Maybe it is because deep inside she knows how bad it is. She enjoys making those weird recipes mixing all kind of ready made things. Just like Cher in that movie "Mermaids". Her guacamole is a crime! And there's a disgusting green cake made with lemon jello, grilled (?) chicken marinated in Coca Cola together with brodo (forgot the english word for brodo) cubes, and so on. Mostly, I try to avoid her place at meal times, or invite her for my place or a restaurant, but... it's not always possible. I don't know about you friends: mine is worth it. 30 years of friendship. Someone I can count on. I'd eat a bucket of that weird guacamole to keep her (please, PLEASE, don't tell her!!!)

May 30, 2007
Farofa in Not About Food

Foot Fetish

I hardly wear shoes at home, but guests are guests. The no-shoes rule applies for Japan (or japanese style rooms, with tatami floor which would be ruined by shoes). You shouldn't surprise your guests with unexpected rules from another culture. If you want to enjoy their company, you must sacrifice a few things to make them feel at home. Or, at least, tell them about the dress rules before they come (so as they can choose nice socks... ;-) . I'd rather have cancer than having no friends.

May 30, 2007
Farofa in Features

The Family Bandit

So sad to live in a world where Yaya's not right...

May 30, 2007
Farofa in Features

Just Bought A Bottle Of Cachaca

51 is cheap crap. Pitu is also very bad. Cristal may be a great liquor but, if it's from Colombia, it's not cachaça. Ypioca (http://www.ypioca.com.br) and Sagatiba (http://www.sagatiba.com) are better, good enough for caipirinhas, and easy to find outside Brazil.. Sagatiba's site has an English version, with recipes that surprised me because they go far away from the traditional caipirinha (lime) or batidas (other fruit like pineapple, passion fruit, ecc.). As for the sugar, it MUST be from cane. Tradition asks for the very fine one, but I'm using an organic brand wich is coarser, and has a delicious sugarcane flavour.
beijinhos!

May 18, 2007
Farofa in Spirits