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Did le Creuset ever use Teflon?

I did mean their cast iron line. I ended up finding one with a white interior on Ebay. Although not as in good shape as this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Le-Cr...

Feb 09, 2014
lorimav in Cookware

Did le Creuset ever use Teflon?

Yes, I meant their cast iron line. This is one auction that I had seen. This one is not particularly grey but others had been. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Le-Creuset-8-...

Feb 09, 2014
lorimav in Cookware

Did le Creuset ever use Teflon?

Hello, I have been looking for the smaller version of le Creuset's deep covered skillet. I have seen a couple with on ebay with black interiors that seem like they have worn to a grey color in spots and are no longer black. They look to me as if they were telfon which had worn away. My skillet bought in 2007 is completely black in the interior and not worn through. I would prefer a new deep covered skillet but the one that they offer currently, the #27 is too big. I need a number #23 for a small amount of deep frying. I would go with a Lodge for the purpose of just frying but Lodge's is about the same size as le Creuset's #27 and would use too much oil. I want the handle and also and the curved sides of a "chicken fryer" and they don't make a deep enough skillet in the 9 inch size otherwise. I see that Williams Sonoma has a slightly deeper skillet but only in their larger sizes. How often does le Creuset sell this style piece sometimes known as a "mijotin"? Is it available elsewhere, France perhaps?

Feb 08, 2014
lorimav in Cookware

Dolmathes with Avgolemono

Yiasas paidia! I am not Greek but I married Greek. Nevertheless I never remembered eating dolmadakia (the stuffed grape leaves) with meat but only the stuffed cabbage leaves ( Laxano Dolmades). The thing that I would like to comment on is using jasmine or basmati rice. My mother-in-law is an excellent cook with an Asia Minor background. When I would try to replicate her dishes at home I failed to do a great job until I took note of what kind of rice she was using. In Greece it is called Carolina rice. It is definitely not a long grain rice. I think in the U.S. it would be called Risotto rice. Try it but the cooking time and liquid might need adjustment. Kali Oreksi !

Feb 13, 2009
lorimav in Recipes

Hummus

The ingredient list from a Lebanese cookbook for Hummus bit-Tahini :

1 can garbanzo beans
3 T. Tahini
1/4 to 1/2 fresh lemon juice
1 clove garlic
1/8 teaspoon cumin
salt
water
finely chopped parsley and/or pomegranate seeds for garnish
simmaq (sumac) optional

Writer says that it is an arabic custom to pour small amount of olive oil over the top as well as a sprinkling of simmaq. Garnish edge of serving dish with finely chopped parsley and mound 1 tablespoon of whole garbanzo beans in center with a few leaves of parsley.

My advice: do not leave the cumin out, do not use loads of garlic or you will miss the other flavors, and definitely do place a little river or canal of quality greek olive oil on the top so you can spoon the humus out nicely with your Lebanese pita. The Lebanese home cooks make fancy little designs with the garbanzo on top. Ready-made humus with a spoon - not nice!

May 05, 2007
lorimav in Home Cooking

What to bring back from Greece?

I always buy oregano and cumin there, Ilios brand. People always ask me to bring back the Greek red wine vinegar which for me is the most important thing to bring back. I use" Top" brand. I bring back Turkish delight (Loukoumi) for kids that like the Narnia books to sample. They have honey made from bees pollinating the thyme that grows wild there. You could get some pistachios grown in Aigina. There are at least 3 kinds of Halvas there. The Macedonian Halvas that you can buy packaged in the supermarket with either chocolate or almonds. This is a lenten sweet popular during the Orthodox fast but available all year. There is also the Halvas Farsalon, and you can buy semolina (simigdali) for making homemade halvas Asia Minor style, fantastic! They have honey sesame sweets called pasteli. You can buy Giocondas, chocolates with hazelnut and pralines, that are wrapped in a little Mona Lisa wrapper, or ION brand Noisettes. In some of the islands they make cookies form almond flour (amygdalota). Dolmades that are homemade are great but Zenith brand canned stuffed grape leaves are okay. Make homemade with an arborio rice. If you like espresso and would like to experiment with Greek ( Turkish) coffee get a packet of greek coffee perhaps Loumidis or Bravo and a small inexpensive Briki from a supermarket to make it in. Put the water and coffee and sugar to taste, in the briki, put it on the burner and as the mixture rises up take it off the burner and pour it in the cup to get the bubbles or foam that the Greeks want in their coffee. I can't stand it but I do not like espresso either. Another thing that Greeks love and serve to guests in small amounts are syruppy sweets made of such things as cherries or quince or even eggplant! that are bought in the supermarkets in glass jars. I used to keep them on hand precisely because I hated them and the Greeks loved them and I would never run out like I would of something like Baklavas or Ketaifi. This would be good to sample from there too but you would probably only want to get packaged in a box because the syrup can run out and be messy. Kali Orexi!

May 05, 2007
lorimav in General Topics

Real Tabbouleh

This sounds authentic. How about adding just a very small amount of cinnamon for authenticity? I saw it in a Lebanese cookbook and was afraid to use it for years and finally tried it. It is great. I have seen diced cucumbers and scallions in authentic tabboulis too.

May 05, 2007
lorimav in Recipes

your best greek salad recipe

By the way, that was the " standard Greek Salad " recipe that they will serve you in 90% of the restaurants in Athens and the "horiatiki salata" is what most Greeks will call a Greek Salad. There is also a fairly "standard" lettuce salad recipe and a "standard" cabage salad recipe that they will serve you in most homes and restaurants.

May 04, 2007
lorimav in Home Cooking

your best greek salad recipe

I lived in Greece for 10 years so I will try to give you an authentic recipe for a Greek salad. A greek salad is called an Horiatiki Salata ( Village Salad ). There is no lettuce in a greek salad. The standard ingredients are tomatoes, long cucumbers, onion usually red but sometimes yellow, green peppers, a few kalamata olives, a liberal amount of greek oregano, greek feta made from sheep or goat's milk, salt and greek olive oil.
As far as I remember neither vinegar nor lemon juice is traditionally used. We always did add a greek red wine vinegar and sometimes capers at our house and I am sure some others did as well, but a restaurant will typically serve the salad with just oil and a slab of thinly sliced feta, never crumbled. Anyone who tries an authentic greek red wine vinegar, we used "Top" brand usually asks me to bring some back from Greece or for the website to buy some in the U.S.. Also, I have not found an Italian or American olive oil that I have liked. We used to get wonderful cold pressed olive oil form the village with a lot of wonderful olive crud on the bottom. Our local Fresh Market stocks a 3 liter tin of Aria brand olive oil from Crete and it is similar to the oil in the greek supermarkets. I tried some Bertoli my Mom bought from Sam's club and almost gagged. It had a strong chemical taste. The Berio brand is not as bad. In Greece the olives are usually picked by hand so the oil is of a good quality. Greek oregano also tastes different and so does the feta. I tried Krinos brand sheep's feta from Bulgaria and it was very good. Other Bulgarian feta was so so. Locally the French goat feta is okay. Experiment with feta until you find a good one.

May 04, 2007
lorimav in Home Cooking