h

Hytzipky's Profile

Title Last Reply

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

AhSo does not work well. It is a poor substitute. You need Char Sui sauce which you can get at an oriental grocery store (China Town? or on line). There are very few ingredients for pork strips. Char Sui sauce is an oriental barbecue sauce. Look it up on the internet to see what the bottle looks like. It is about $3.00 a bottle and it makes a lot of marinade. You need about 7 oz. (1/2 a jar) with 1/3 cup of whiskey (I use Canadian Club or Seagram's Seven), red food coloring and honey. Just marinade a nice pork filet or two in all but the honey for at least 24 hours. Preheat your oven to 300F. Bake for 25 minutes, turn over and baste with the marinade. Bake for 20 minutes. Baste with honey to glaze the top. Bring your rack up and broil for the last 5 minutes before removing from the oven. Let sit for 5 minutes and slice. One jar of Char Sui sauce can marinate about 10-12 pounds of pork tenderloin.

Apr 08, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

You are welcome. I hope everyone enjoys this as much as my family does.

Mar 26, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

My face is red. Thank you

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

No offense taken. We are all entitled to our opinion.

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

My personal recipe has them. I have had them at Oriental Jade (now called Jade Restaurant) in Peabody but the son took over for the father. I haven't eaten there in a long time. I got my recipe from the original China Sales. The owner was a friend of my father and gave me his recipe when he found out that I was writing my cookbook. I live crab so I put more crab inside my cheese filling. I make extra filling because my husband loves when I make him a sandwich with this filling as his crab spread. I left this recipe in China during my last visit so that they can use it there. I have many friends there who take me to their restaurants to compare actual CANTON food with Cantonese Style from the USA. I even took two friends to Boston this two tears ago to sample for themselves. Jade was their favorite. Many things at Kowloon were good but they are leaning mire towards Thai these days.

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

The cab might be expensive but a phone call can possibly get a set rate for the 20 minute drive. People hire a cab all the time in Boston. It can also take 20 minutes to get from Beacon St at Storrow Drive over to Fenway Park to see a ball game - depending upon the traffic. The internet says 10 miles. The estimated time is 19 minutes. Night Taxi fare is USD $32.00. www.taxiautofare.com

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Kowloon is in Saugus, MA. They are only 20 minutes out of downtown Boston on US 1 north. You can take a cab there and get the finest Chinese food in the Boston area. You will not be disappointed.

Mar 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Su Chang is not Cantonese style. It is more Szechwan style. Real Chinese food uses real crab in the Rangoons. Imitation crabmeat is just a cheap way of making these dumplings. You can taste the difference. Some restaurants cur corners and some only fill the center with cream cheese and chives. These are not crab Rangoons. I ate at Su Changs and was not impressed. Why eat there when great food us only five minutes west of there?

Mar 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

To cooking Lisa, my recommendations for eating the best Boston styled Chinese food in the Boston area is
#1 Kowloon in Saugus, MA
#2. Jade Restaurant in Peabody, MA
KOWLOON is about 20 minutes north of Boston on Route 1 North. JADE is about 30 minutes north of Boston on Lowell Street in Peabody, MA just off Route 1 north.

Feb 16, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I have eaten in Canton and in Bejing. Both places cook similar food and all are very similar to Boston style. The styles cooked in NY and Chicago are more typical if Polynesian style of cooking. Using the Chinese ingredients with the Polynesian spices makes the food quite different. Boston style is the real way of cooking Chinese food but you can't make people who grow up with the NY favors to agree unless they actually travel to China. NYers would probably like the food in Vietnam and Thailand much better.

You are lucky that you found a place in Texas which cooks Boston style. In Florida, they think that adding darker soy sauce to the white lobster sauce will make it taste mire like Boston style. Color does not change taste.

Feb 16, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Sorry you were unhappy with the recipe. Everyone likes their noodles a certain way -- some like them soft, some like them al dente. Make them the way you and your family like them and turn this dish into your own. Everyone will be happy with the taste AND the texture then.

Feb 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I use Mothers molasses or black strap. Both are good.

Oct 23, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Glad you liked them.

Jun 10, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I learned how to make them. They are yummy.

Jun 08, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

That was a part of the history of the Chinese settlements in the USA. Many returned to the USA with their families because there was a better way of living here. A Chinese man could feed and take care of his family in the USA. China was having their own revolution with the change in dynasties. Many of your ancestors are still in that same village in China. Not much has changed in their change of life, either. They survived because of those who immigrated to the USA, too. An amazing story of two cultures. I was i your village in China so I learned about your ancestral history. Your family was lucky to come here yet your culture still lives over there.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I posted the recipe with another question, Nancy. Here it is again:

CHINESE SPARE RIBS
(for approx. 8-10 lb. boneless or bone-in spare ribs)

½ jar hoisin sauce (1 jar = 15 oz.)
½ jar **black bean and garlic sauce (1 jar = 13½ oz.)
⅓ cup whiskey (any brand -- Seagram's 7 and Canadian Club are the best while Irish whiskey or Scotch is not too good)
1 cup sugar
½ small bottle of red food coloring (for appearance only)

**You may substitute 1 jar ground bean sauce and add approx. 5 cloves or crushed garlic.

Mix together above ingredients.

Remove excess fat from spare ribs and pour marinade over top. Marinate for 24 hours or prepare ahead and refrigerate for several days or freeze, uncooked for even longer. If you get a side of ribs, take the excess “boneless” meat off the back and remove the excess boney part from the ribs. It is a good snack so don’t throw it away. Marinate it with the gourmet bones.

Bake in hot oven (425 ̊ F) for approx. 15 minutes. Drain off excess fat. Baste with marinade sauce. Continue to cook another 5 minutes or until browned. Turn over and re-baste with marinade sauce. Cook until browned. You may barbeque if desired but do not burn it.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking
1

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Yes. Boston style Chinese food is closer to the real "Canton China" Chinese food than other types made in the USA. The sauces in real Cantonese style is dark like in Boston. The taste is sweeter -- unlike that made in New York or Chicago. I had no problems eating food when I was in the Canton area of China because the flavor was the same as when I grew up in the Boston suburbs. The difference is the amount of meat used in the food. In China, they use the parts of the chicken, pork and beef which most people in the USA throw away. They use a lot of grizzle (cartalege) and joints. The amount of beef is minimal compared to the amount of bone which gets sucked and then spit out in China. The parts of the chicken used in China are the wing "tips", feet (or paws) and innard parts like gizzards, hearts and livers. There is more meat used when they cook their Beijjing Duck (we call it Peking - the old name). I would have been shocked to see chicken breasts on a menu anywhere in China. The part of SF you speak about was settled by people of a very old town in S. China. The men went to SF to make enough money to feed their families who were starving. Eventually, those people returned to their S. China town but they left behind their cooking style. It was a good trade. Here is the recipe for Boston style spare ribs.

CHINESE SPARE RIBS
(for approx. 8-10 lb. boneless or bone-in spare ribs)

½ jar hoisin sauce (1 jar = 15 oz.)
½ jar **black bean and garlic sauce (1 jar = 13½ oz.)
⅓ cup whiskey (any brand but Seagram's 7 or Canadian Club are the best and Irish whiskey (Scotch) is not too good)
1 cup granular sugar
½ small bottle of red food coloring (for appearance only)

**You may substitute 1 jar ground bean sauce and add approx. 5 cloves or crushed garlic.

Mix together above ingredients.

Remove excess fat from spare ribs and pour marinade over top. Marinate for 24 hours or prepare ahead and refrigerate for several days or freeze, uncooked for even longer. If you get a side of ribs, take the excess “boneless” meat off the back and remove the excess boney part from the ribs. It is a good snack so don’t throw it away. Marinate it with the gourmet bones.

Bake in hot oven (425 ̊ F) for approx. 15 minutes. Drain off excess fat. Baste with marinade sauce. Continue to cook another 5 minutes or until browned. Turn over and re-baste with marinade sauce. Cook until browned. You may barbeque if desired but do not burn it.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Careful on the hoisin and molasses. That is where the sweetness comes into this. Use your own tastebuds. Everyone tastes things differently. Some think it is too salty and others think it needs more salt. Some want more sweetness and others eliminate some of the sweet ingredients. Keep adjusting this until it comes out the way YOU and your family like it. The egg does not add to the darkness. The dark soy sauce and molasses adds the color. If you use regular soy sauce, it will not be as dark as if you use dark or thick or mushroom soy sauce. Those sauces are very dark. Oddly enough, there is less salt in the dark soy sauce than there is in the regular soy sauce.

Apr 05, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Lobster sauce should not contain any actual shellfish. It was called lobster sauce because they used to make this and put lobster in it and call it Lobster in sauce. People would only want the sauce, however. They sold just the sauce and made a lot of money from that lobster sauce.

My father was highly allergic to shellfish but for some reason the oyster sauce didn't bother him. But if you want to eliminate it, add a bit more hoisin sauce. Watch the salt though. Taste it as you go to make sure you do not over-salt this. Sometimes I add a bit more molasses -- and it is really yummy. The only shellfish in there is the tiny bit inside the oyster sauce so be careful.

Apr 05, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Just enjoy them. Native Bostonians need not suffer any longer. I don't have all the recipes that people want but I have a lot of them. I just wish that I could find the chinese candy recipe - with the sesame seeds over the chewy honey. I couldn't find them in China. I got close but it was a jelly and not a honey candy so I was disappointed.

Feb 19, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

This is not the recipe for the Saugus wings. Sorry to disappoint you.

Feb 19, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I just returned from South China where I found that the Boston style of Chinese food is cooked over there. Many of the food is not made -- like lobster sauce. They never heard of it because their idea of a lobster is a small claw-less Caribbean style lobster. I introduced my Cantonese friend to a 10 pound Maine lobster and the look on her face was priceless. They pay about $60 US for a 1-1/4 pound clawless lobster. She never saw claws before. She and several members of her family will be talking about this experience for many years to come. Just to let you know, they only serve duck sauce with Bejing duck (Peking was the old name for Bejing) and once the duck is eaten, the sauce is removed from the table. I grew up with the duck sauce being used for many items other than duck. Their sauce is the same one as made in MA using plums -- and not the type made in New York and Chicago using apricots. So, in conclusion, I have come to the determination that the real Cantonese style of Chinese food is the type made in Boston and not what is made in New York (tongue sticking out and a smile on my face.)

Feb 18, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Thanks for the compliments. I hate to see fellow Bostonians suffer, actually. Glad to see you enjoying these.

There are two recipes for Chicken Wings depending upon where you go. Most places use the Teriyaki style and those are my favorite. Kowloon uses a diferent style - using gin. They are delicious but I still prefer the Teriyaki style like used at Oriental Jade and the old ChinaLand -- this recipe was given to me in ChinaTown, Boston.

CHINESE CHICKEN WINGS
(for 5 lb. chicken wings)

Preheat oven to 450̊F oven

Mix together the following ingredients:

1 lg.(10 oz.) bottle teriyaki sauce
4 tbsp. garlic powder
1 cup sugar

For best chicken wings, use "drummettes" or the 5-6 lb. bag of wingettes. Those wings are pre-washed and are the meatiest.

Mix together the first 3 ingredients. Blend with wire whisk, blender or hand blender until fully liquid. Try to eliminate lumps.

Pour over cleaned wings or wingettes and marinate chicken wings for 24 hours. Turn frequently to insure all wings get marinated fully. I sometimes pour the sauce over the wings and place in the freezer until I am ready to use it. Many of the wholesale houses (BJ’s, Costco, Sam’s) sell the 10-12 pound bags now so I make one batch to eat and one for the freezer.

Place the wings on a tin-foil lined baking sheet with sides. The mixture tends to caramelize when baking so it will really stick to the pan if you don’t line it no matter how much non-stick spray you put on the pan. Bake wings in the preheated oven for approximately 15 minutes. Drain off excess fat. Baste with marinade sauce. Cook another 5 minutes until brown. Turn over and re-baste with marinade. Cook another 15-20 minutes or until the chicken is nicely caramelized and brown.

This does not barbecue well. The wings tend to burn because of the high sugar content of the sauce..

This is the recipe from Kowloon:

Boston Style Chinese Chicken Wings
(For 3-4 Pounds Chicken Wings)
1. 3 lb. Chicken wings
2. 2 T. sugar
3. salt to taste
4. 6 T. soy sauce
5. 6 T. water
6. Crushed ginger to taste
7. 1 T. gin
Make a marinade by mixing all ingredients except the chicken wings. Pour the marinade over the wings, cover and refrigerate overnight.
Deep fry the wings in oil for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oil, drain and serve. Serves 3-4 as an appetizer.

Feb 18, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Sure. I made it this past weekend from friends of mine who are visiting from Canton, China. They loved it, too.

Boston Style Lobster Sauce

• Vegetable oil
• 16 oz. ground pork or ground beef
• 6 cloves minced garlic
• 3 tbs. oyster sauce
• 2 tbs. Hoisin sauce
• 1 tbs. dark soy sauce
• 1 c. water
• 3 tbs. molasses
• Cornstarch to thicken (5 tbs. plus 1/4 cup water mixed together)
• 2 egg scrambled
• 2 chopped green scallion for garnish
• 1 tbs. sesame oil
Use enough oil to cover the bottom of a wok or deep frying pan. Heat the oil and stir fry the meat with the garlic. Add the water and then the molasses. Add the oyster sauce and soy sauce. Stir well. Add the cornstarch to thicken the sauce. Blend the eggs into the sauce and continue stir frying until the eggs are set. Stir in the sesame oil. Top with the scallions and serve with rice or noodles. Serves 3 - 4.

For shrimp or lobster in Lobster sauce:

6 colossal or 12 large (raw) de-veined shrimp cut into pieces
or
1 chicken lobster cut into small parts (raw)

Put the shell fish into the hot sauce at the end. Allow to sit in the hot lobster sauce and continue to cook with the heat turned off for about 5 - 10 minutes (or until shrimp is no longer transparent. The lobster might take a little longer in the shell. It might be best to cook the lobster in with the lobster sauce with the heat on simmer.

Serve over white rice or as a side with fried rice or lo mien.

Dec 01, 2012
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

"Polynesian" style Chinese restaurants

My reasons for learning how to cook the Boston Style of Chinese cuisine is for the exact reasons you mentioned. I cannot get anything close to Boaton style in Florida. I've conquered the appetizers and the dishes which were my favorites. As a result, my husband and I eat our favorite food here on Florida about once a month. It is a LOT of work and it is devoured in just a few minutes but it is worth the effort. Enjoy the recipes you see here. The work is rewarding.

Sep 12, 2012
Hytzipky in Northern New England

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Here is the lo mein recipe. This is the vegetable lo mein with beef or pork added.

BEEF OR PORK LO MEIN

Main Ingredients:

Marinate Ingredients:
1 cup lean, boneless pork or flank steak
2 tsp. soy sauce
6-8 dried mushrooms (soaked to rehydrate)
sliced long and thin
1 tbs. red wine
1 lb. fresh, soft lo mien noodles (fettuccini or linguini - Boston style is flat noodles)
1 tsp. corn starch
1 cup snow peas (pea pods)
1 tsp. sesame oil
several stalks of bok choy
2 carrots
2 slices fresh ginger root
2 cloves garlic (crushed)
1 tsp. salt
2 tbs. oyster sauce
2 tbs. Hoisin sauce
1 can sliced water chestnuts
1/4 lb. bean sprouts
cooking oil and sesame seed oil
1/2 cup water mixed with 2 tbs. corn starch
1-2 tsp. MSG (if desired)

Soak the mushrooms (I use Puccini and oyster mushrooms) before starting any preparations. Slice meat into thin pieces then slice again into thin strips. Marinate meat or pork. Set aside. Prepare pea pods and place in a large plate. Slice the bok choy diagonally in approximately 1" pieces. (Try to get the bok choy with small white roots rather than wide white roots. They're sweeter.) Place on the same dish, separately. Remove mushrooms from water and slice into thin strips. Place in vegetable dish, too. Cook the lo mien noodles in boiling water for approximately 8 minutes. (Fresh noodles cook faster so only about 2-3 minutes if fresh.) Drain noodles and separate a little so it doesn't stick together. Peal 2 carrots and slice into very small, thin strips. This will give the lo mien color. You can also add or substitute shrimp or crab or mitation crab meat for a nice color, also. Separate the noodles, again. Heat wok. Add about cup oil to wok and coat it well. Add « the noodles and fry it fast (about 5-10 minutes). If you need to, add a bit more oil to make the noodles crispier. Add about 1 to 2 tsp. salt while cooking. Noodles will start to get golden...don't let them burn! Remove noodles from wok and place in a platter. Cover noodles with lid to keep warm. Repeat the process with the rest of the noodles.

Add 1 tbs. oil to the hot wok. Add a slice of ginger and 1 crushed garlic clove. Add marinated meat and stir. Add mushrooms. Cook for 2-4 minutes. Remove ginger and garlic. Remove cooked meat and place in a bowl. Add more oil to wok (about¬ cup). Add a slice of ginger and a crushed garlic clove. Fry until brown and remove. Add carrot strips and pea pods. Cook for 1 minute. Add bok choy and stir. Cook for about 2 minutes. Drain can of sliced water chestnuts. Add to wok and stir for another minute. Add meat mixture. Stir. Add the bean sprouts and MSG (optional). Stir. Make a well in the middle of the wok by placing the cooked mixture around the sides. Place 2 tbs. oyster sauce, 2 tbs. hoisin sauce, 2 tsp. soy sauce, 1 tsp. salt and 2 tsp. sesame oil to well. Pour in water/corn starch mixture and stir until gravy is made. Mix in food mixture and stir well. Add noodles and stir everything together. Cook for 4-5 minutes. Add 1 to 2 tbs. dark or thick soy sauce for color (more if needed). Place in serving dish and enjoy. For those who like "hot" dishes, add 1 tsp. hot pepper sauce when adding dark soy sauce for a delightfully hot taste.

*****Fast Frying Method: Spray cookie sheet with vegetable spray. Put oil on the top. Broil in oven for 2-4 minutes on each side. Do not burn noodles! For easier frying, fry noodles in a flat frying pan instead of wok. It is a bit easier but it will make an extra pot to wash.

May 22, 2012
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I learned how to make the Boston Style duck sauce in China Town (downtown Boston) many years back. Nobody there has a real recipe. It is just appoximate so this recipe is vague. You keep adding items until you get it right:

¼ small jar of plum sauce
1 large jar of apple sauce (plain)
sugar (to taste)
¼ cup vinegar (approximately)
dark soy sauce (for color)

MY OPINION: You must play with this recipe until you get the desired consistency. Everyone likes different styles of sweet 'n sour sauce. You need at least 5 times as much apple sauce as plum sauce. If you have too much plum sauce it really tastes bad -- keep adding applesauce until it has a good taste. You might need a little more vinegar and soy sauce -- that's why I said to play with it. These are the only ingredients and you will eventually get it right so always write down how much you add or subtract so you won't have to fuss the next time you make this. I always make a lot. This stays well in the refrigerator. (more than 6 months - if it lasts that long)

Jun 05, 2011
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Char Sui sauce in English is Chinese Barbecue Sauce. I get it at my local oriental market or grocery store. I've been in stores that sell Thai, Vietnamese and Chinese groceries and they all have it. I haven't looked in the local grocery stores. Many are now carrying a variety of oriental groceries like black bean and garlic, fish sauce and other seasonings but I haven't really looked for Char Sui. If you don't have a local oriental market, you might try a China Town in your area. They usually have a local store where oriental people buy their supplies. If all else fails, you could ask at your local oriental restaurant. They could tell you where to buy Char Sui -- or maybe they could sell you some.

Mar 16, 2011
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Many people have written to me since I first posted in 2007. Four years later, I have sent my recipes to hundreds of people who have read the articles. I have now perfected my eggroll recipe so that it is as close to Boston style as can be. It is a lot of work and makes a lot of egg rolls but it is very good. I can now make all my favorite dishes from Boston and don't miss the unique flavors as much as I did 4 years ago as a result. If I had the money to open a Boston Style restaurant down in Florida, I would do so -- it would be a great money maker with lines out the door. But since I don't, I will share this recipe on line so that those who want to make the egg rolls can do so. The ingredients are simple and if you are making my pork strips, it makes the egg rolls taste awesome.

BOSTON STYLE EGG ROLLS

2 bunches of celery (cut it to fit in the pan and ice bath)
1/4 cup (approximately) of finely diced boneless spare ribs.
Salt
Pepper
Egg Roll Wrappers

Boil water in a 2 quart pot. Put a very large pot aside filled with ice water. Place the cut and washed celery in the boiling water for 2-3 minutes then a double ice bath. Try to dry it well. Put it through a grinder. This will get out a lot of the threads and water. Drain it very well. Soak up all the water you can so that it is really dry. (If you like celery juice, this is delicious.)
Make some of the pork strips and always keep some available in the freezer for the egg rolls. Mix the diced roast pork ribs into the dried ground celery. Add a little salt and pepper to taste. Make sure that you taste it so that you know if it needs more seasoning. This should make enough filling for 12 rolls depending on how big you make them.

CHINESE PORK STRIPS

Boneless pork strip or pork tenderloin roast and trim
14 oz. jar Char Sui Sauce (Chinese Barbecue Sauce)
⅓ cup whiskey
red food coloring
honey

Trim fat from pork.

Add ½ jar of Char Sui Sauce, whiskey and food coloring together.

Pour liquid over pork, coat well and allow marinating overnight.

Preheat oven to 300º F.

Bake for 25 minutes. Turn the loin over and bake another 20-25 minutes.

During the last 5 minutes, coat top with honey.

Return pork to oven and broil until golden.

Slice and serve.

NOTE: One jar of Char Sui Sauce along with other ingredients can yield enough marinate for 10-12 lbs. of pork.

Mar 14, 2011
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

[NOTE: We've moved this discussion from the thread at http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/329906# -- The Chowhound Team]

We moved to S. Florida about 10 years ago and the Chinese food is awful. Boston style is unique. I learned to cook most of the foods before I left MA (taking a course from a wonderful Chinese lady who owned a grocery store in Burlington, MA). I can make the spare ribs. I can make two types of chicken wings -- one is the garlicy type which was served in these restaurants from when I was a little girl and the other is the Kowloon style which is deeply fried. I can make lobster sauce. I have a recipe for beef lo mein and fried rice, too. I can even make pork strips and crab rangoons. They are all wonderful and we have Chinese night about once a month. But I cann't get the recipe for egg rolls. I went to Kowloon and they said that their recipe is a secret. I tried at Oriental Jade and they laughed. I would be eternally grateful to get this recipe. I travel to MA 3-4 times a year and always take home 4 orders (8) of egg rolls when I come back. I will re-fry them and they taste really good that way. Does anyone have that recipe? I only need to know what goes into making the filling. I can do the wrapping on my own. Please write to me at: hytzipky0719@bellsouth.net if you have this recipe. I will share what I have with you. Thank you.

Apr 29, 2007
Hytzipky in Home Cooking
1