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Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Here you go........
PORK FRIED RICE
4-6 cups cooked rice
½ lb. (2-3 cups) bean sprouts
½ to ¾ cup frozen green peas
1 cup diced "cooked" pork (or "cooked" chicken if preferred)
8 medium shrimp (optional)
1-2 eggs
1-2 stalk diced scallions (separate white part from green end)
½ small can water chestnuts (sliced)
½ small can bamboo shoots (sliced)
1 tsp. sesame seed oil
3-4 tbsp. double dark soy sauce
2 tbs. hoisin sauce
3 tbs. apple sauce (optional)
2 tbsp. oil
⅓ cup oil
Peal and de-vein shrimp if you wish to add it to the rice. Slice 4-5 slices per shrimp (approx. ¼ inch slices). Dice cooked pork strip or boneless spare ribs (or boneless, skinless chicken breast) into approximately the same size pieces as the shrimp. Make sure you trim any excess fat from pork (or chicken). Place cooked, diced meat in a good-sized bowl. In another bowl, place ½ to ¾ cup frozen green peas. Cook up 2-3 cups of raw rice. This will yield about 4-6 cups of cooked rice.
Prepare wok by making the empty wok hot and then adding cool oil to it. Coat oil in wok. By adding the cool oil to the hot wok nothing will stick to the wok when you cook it. Put 1 clove of crushed garlic in hot oil. Add raw shrimp and cook for approx. 30 seconds. Remove shrimp. Scramble 2 eggs. Fry in the same liquid but spread the egg all around like a crepe. Turn over until cooked flat. Cut into strips and then into pieces. Add the egg to the cooked meat bowl.
Add about ⅓ cup oil to wok. Add white part of diced scallions. Add cooked bowl and fry for about 30 seconds. Add steamed or boiled rice. Stir together and cook for 3-4 minutes. Add 2-3 cups of bean sprouts, bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Continue to cook but turn the heat down a little. Add the peas. Add 14 shakes of dark soy sauce (or approximately 3-4 tbsp.) for color and taste. Taste it. Add the hoisin sauce and apple sauce (if desired). Cook about 5 minutes. Add approximately 1 tsp. sesame oil. Stir. Salt to taste if necessary.
MY OPINION: Very tasty. It's a meal in itself. You could add anything you want to this recipe. You can eliminate the meat/chicken for a vegetarian dish.

Aug 14, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I do have one but the price to print it is outrageous. I was selling the PDF Chinese food section here but ChowHound won't let me do it. They removed my post with the price and PayPal info saying it was against their policy. I still sell the chapter with hopes of earning enough money to buy the first 2500 copies of my cookbook myself. The publishers till me that if those copies sold that they would pay for the future publishing. I've been told that cookbooks do not sell unless you are a famous chef. I don't know any other way to raise money to publish my cookbook. Write to me privately if you wish.

Jul 02, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

The Boston style duck sauce is much different from the rest of the sauce around the USA. In China, their "duck" sauce is served with Peking duck only. That sauce is exactly like Boston style. The signature main ingredient is Plum sauce. Not apricot sauce like other styles use. The darkness comes from the soy sauce. The ingredients I gave are the basic ingredients but you have to add and remove until you get it right. Your taste buds will tell you when you get there. I found that the plum sauce is very potent so only add a small amount at a time until the taste is right. If you start to taste like prunes, you have too much so you have to add more of the other ingredients to compensate. The vinegar is plain, white, distilled vinegar. If you want to use apple cider vinegar it is ok but it might change the requirements for apple sauce. I've found the distilled to be the best.

I am like you when it comes to perfection. I still bring back extra duck sauce when I am in MA. But I don't go often enough to get me through a whole year. Since I can't carry it on a plane, it has to be packed in a suitcase so I am limitd with the amount I can take home.

If you need to tweak your fried rice, try adding a little duck sauce at the end of cooking. Try a little at a time until you get the flavor you desire. That is usually your missing taste.

I use a long grain rice. The best rice is the sticky rice used in sushi. You need that extra starch but if you don't have the starch and your rice is too loose, you can always use tapioca starch in the water when you make your rice. This works with stripped rice like Minute Rice. Add a tablespoon of starch (corn or potato starch will also work) to the water before bringing the water to a boil and then add your rice. It will make the rice sticky.

Jul 02, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

You are very welcome. I have heard similar comments from many people. It makes me feel really good to know that so many are enjoying my recipes since this thread was opened. There is no reason you have to give up enjoying a part of your life just because your new life takes you away from your home. My recipes are now being enjoyed around the world and that amazes me. Eat up and share it with others.

Jul 01, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking
1

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

New email address for those who write is ritabarry@bellsouth.net.

Jun 30, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Lobster sauce is the name used for the dish made with lobster in a meat sauce. Some people didn't want the lobster or shrimp. They just wanted the sauce as a main dish. The American restaurants put it on the menu as "lobster sauce only". Eventually the "only" disappeared. Boston style is a dark sauce while New York or Chicago style is white. Two different tastes. Boston style is always a bit sweeter because of the molasses and thick, dark soy sauce.

Jun 30, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

The corn starch is to make the sauce thicker. I make the slurry and only add enough to make it as thick as I like it. You might add less to make the sauce soupier or mire to make it thicker. Most of these recipes are correct but they have to be tweaked until it meets your orn preferences.

Jun 30, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Yes, that must be it. If the scorpion bowl recipe is too much to handle, you might like a suffering bastard:

SUFFERIN’ BASTARD COCKTAIL

1 ½ oz rum
1 oz over-proof rum
3/4 oz Orange Curacao liqueur
½ oz orgeat syrup
1 oz fresh lime juice
2 oz fresh orange juice

Fill shaker with ice. Pour all the ingredients over the ice and put the lid on. If you have a Boston shaker, put the ice in the glass up to the top. Put all the ingredients in the glass and put the metal shaker over the top securely. Shake for about 20 shakes. Pour into an old fashioned glass filled with ice.

If you double the drink and pour it in a special “TIKI” glass, it will make you happy. You can also garnish it with some cherries and an orange slice on a swizzle stick.

if you can't find the orgaet syrup, it is made by Tarini. This is an almond flavor syrup and I buy it right from there. Some liquor stores carry it.

http://shop.torani.com/?utm_source=bi...

You don't feel this going down. It is like drinking fruit juice. You feel it when you try to stand up. One is enough and two is ........

I'm going to Boston in a few weeks. I will try to find the recipe for Subgum Chow Mein when I am there. I still have a few friends who load me down with goodies when I go there.

Jun 25, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I do not have any subgum fried rice recipes. I do have the recipe for the scorpion bowl, however. Here it is:

CHINESE SCORPION BOWL

3 cups crushed ice
2 oz. gin
1 oz. dark rum
2 oz. 151 proof rum (Jamaican Over proof)
2 oz. light rum
2 oz. vodka
2 oz. grenadine syrup
8 oz. orange juice
10 oz. pineapple juice
3 oz. lemon juice
Pineapple chunks
Maraschino cherries
Orange slices

Place the crushed ice in a large pitcher and pour in the gin, dark rum, 151 proof rum, light rum, vodka, grenadine, orange juice, pineapple juice, and lemon juice. Stir well to mix, then pour into a large (at least 40 ounces), decorative cocktail glass and garnish with pineapple, cherries and orange slices.

This makes one scorpion bowl which should be shared by 2-4 people.

Jun 24, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Welcome to the website. I have posted my Crab Rangoon recipe before but will do so again for those who can't find it in the thread. Also, I do not have the recipe for the half chickens. I need to know the right name for them. Many places made American dishes for those who did not want Chinese food -- like some children. Chicken with French Fries were among those. I have the Cantonese recipe for many different styles of chicken. Here is the recipe for the Crab Rangoon:

Crab Rangoon

16 oz. softened cream cheese
1/2 cup chopped real or imitation crab meat (I only use real crab meat unless someone has an allergy to shellfish)
2 chopped green onions (scallions)
1 tsp. sugar
2 cloves crushed garlic
1 package wonton wrappers
1 egg (scrambled in a bowl)
Hot oil

Mix first 5 ingredients well.
Spoon 1 tbsp. of mixture onto wrapper.
Coat the edges of the wonton skin with egg to act as a glue.
Bring all corners up (at top of mixture) and pinch to secure.
Deep fry for approximately 1 minute or until golden brown.
Do not try to turn them over because they will pop and you will lose the filling.
Drain on paper towels.
Makes 25-30.

Jun 22, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Those from Canton China settled in San Francisco. Some of the best Cantonese restaurants are in Chinatown there. The fried rice in Boston is sweeter than most fried rice's you will find around the country. I found that in a pinch, I can get an order of Mu Shu Pork without any pancakes from most any Chinese restaurant and add it to rice which has been steamed and then fried with onion until lightly brown. Add a bit of hoisin and soy sauce for flavor. If you have Boston style duck sauce (apple sauce, vinegar, sugar, black soy sauce and a tiny bit of plum sauce) it is better than the hoisin and soy. It should help. It's not exactly gourmet, but it will be very close and is easy to make.

Jun 05, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

"Polynesian" style Chinese restaurants

I do have the recipe for an SB. It's easy to make. You need 1 oz. overproof rum (Jamaican), 1-1/2 oz. white rum (Bacardi and NOT spiced), 1 oz. lime juice, 2 oz. orange juice, 3/4 oz. orange curacao, 1/2 oz. Almond (Orgeat) Syrup, orange slice and maraschino cherry.

If you can't find the orgaet syrup, you can order it directly at Torini.com (http://shop.torani.com/Almond-Orgeat-...)

Fill a mixing glass with ice. Add all ingredients except for orange slice and cherry. Shake well. Pore over a tall glass filled with ice. Add more orange juice if needed to fill the glass or dilute (this is potent). Put a slice of orange on the rim of the glass. Stick a cherry through the top of the orange skin with fancy toothpick as a garnish.

Drink slowly and with food in your stomach. It doesn't taste strong but it will blow your mind before you are half done. Have a second one at your own risk. Enjoy.

Apr 23, 2014
Hytzipky in Northern New England

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Dear Jeff,
It would be great to have your recipes shared here. I spent much of my college years with friends who lived on Tyler Street in Chinatown, Boston. I got many recipes there. Please feel free to post your recipes here,too. I am sure others would appreciate trying them for themselves. Thank you.

Apr 20, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

AhSo does not work well. It is a poor substitute. You need Char Sui sauce which you can get at an oriental grocery store (China Town? or on line). There are very few ingredients for pork strips. Char Sui sauce is an oriental barbecue sauce. Look it up on the internet to see what the bottle looks like. It is about $3.00 a bottle and it makes a lot of marinade. You need about 7 oz. (1/2 a jar) with 1/3 cup of whiskey (I use Canadian Club or Seagram's Seven), red food coloring and honey. Just marinade a nice pork filet or two in all but the honey for at least 24 hours. Preheat your oven to 300F. Bake for 25 minutes, turn over and baste with the marinade. Bake for 20 minutes. Baste with honey to glaze the top. Bring your rack up and broil for the last 5 minutes before removing from the oven. Let sit for 5 minutes and slice. One jar of Char Sui sauce can marinate about 10-12 pounds of pork tenderloin.

Apr 08, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

You are welcome. I hope everyone enjoys this as much as my family does.

Mar 26, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

My face is red. Thank you

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

No offense taken. We are all entitled to our opinion.

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

My personal recipe has them. I have had them at Oriental Jade (now called Jade Restaurant) in Peabody but the son took over for the father. I haven't eaten there in a long time. I got my recipe from the original China Sales. The owner was a friend of my father and gave me his recipe when he found out that I was writing my cookbook. I live crab so I put more crab inside my cheese filling. I make extra filling because my husband loves when I make him a sandwich with this filling as his crab spread. I left this recipe in China during my last visit so that they can use it there. I have many friends there who take me to their restaurants to compare actual CANTON food with Cantonese Style from the USA. I even took two friends to Boston this two tears ago to sample for themselves. Jade was their favorite. Many things at Kowloon were good but they are leaning mire towards Thai these days.

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

The cab might be expensive but a phone call can possibly get a set rate for the 20 minute drive. People hire a cab all the time in Boston. It can also take 20 minutes to get from Beacon St at Storrow Drive over to Fenway Park to see a ball game - depending upon the traffic. The internet says 10 miles. The estimated time is 19 minutes. Night Taxi fare is USD $32.00. www.taxiautofare.com

Mar 13, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Kowloon is in Saugus, MA. They are only 20 minutes out of downtown Boston on US 1 north. You can take a cab there and get the finest Chinese food in the Boston area. You will not be disappointed.

Mar 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Su Chang is not Cantonese style. It is more Szechwan style. Real Chinese food uses real crab in the Rangoons. Imitation crabmeat is just a cheap way of making these dumplings. You can taste the difference. Some restaurants cur corners and some only fill the center with cream cheese and chives. These are not crab Rangoons. I ate at Su Changs and was not impressed. Why eat there when great food us only five minutes west of there?

Mar 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

To cooking Lisa, my recommendations for eating the best Boston styled Chinese food in the Boston area is
#1 Kowloon in Saugus, MA
#2. Jade Restaurant in Peabody, MA
KOWLOON is about 20 minutes north of Boston on Route 1 North. JADE is about 30 minutes north of Boston on Lowell Street in Peabody, MA just off Route 1 north.

Feb 16, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I have eaten in Canton and in Bejing. Both places cook similar food and all are very similar to Boston style. The styles cooked in NY and Chicago are more typical if Polynesian style of cooking. Using the Chinese ingredients with the Polynesian spices makes the food quite different. Boston style is the real way of cooking Chinese food but you can't make people who grow up with the NY favors to agree unless they actually travel to China. NYers would probably like the food in Vietnam and Thailand much better.

You are lucky that you found a place in Texas which cooks Boston style. In Florida, they think that adding darker soy sauce to the white lobster sauce will make it taste mire like Boston style. Color does not change taste.

Feb 16, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Sorry you were unhappy with the recipe. Everyone likes their noodles a certain way -- some like them soft, some like them al dente. Make them the way you and your family like them and turn this dish into your own. Everyone will be happy with the taste AND the texture then.

Feb 12, 2014
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I use Mothers molasses or black strap. Both are good.

Oct 23, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Glad you liked them.

Jun 10, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I learned how to make them. They are yummy.

Jun 08, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

That was a part of the history of the Chinese settlements in the USA. Many returned to the USA with their families because there was a better way of living here. A Chinese man could feed and take care of his family in the USA. China was having their own revolution with the change in dynasties. Many of your ancestors are still in that same village in China. Not much has changed in their change of life, either. They survived because of those who immigrated to the USA, too. An amazing story of two cultures. I was i your village in China so I learned about your ancestral history. Your family was lucky to come here yet your culture still lives over there.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

I posted the recipe with another question, Nancy. Here it is again:

CHINESE SPARE RIBS
(for approx. 8-10 lb. boneless or bone-in spare ribs)

½ jar hoisin sauce (1 jar = 15 oz.)
½ jar **black bean and garlic sauce (1 jar = 13½ oz.)
⅓ cup whiskey (any brand -- Seagram's 7 and Canadian Club are the best while Irish whiskey or Scotch is not too good)
1 cup sugar
½ small bottle of red food coloring (for appearance only)

**You may substitute 1 jar ground bean sauce and add approx. 5 cloves or crushed garlic.

Mix together above ingredients.

Remove excess fat from spare ribs and pour marinade over top. Marinate for 24 hours or prepare ahead and refrigerate for several days or freeze, uncooked for even longer. If you get a side of ribs, take the excess “boneless” meat off the back and remove the excess boney part from the ribs. It is a good snack so don’t throw it away. Marinate it with the gourmet bones.

Bake in hot oven (425 ̊ F) for approx. 15 minutes. Drain off excess fat. Baste with marinade sauce. Continue to cook another 5 minutes or until browned. Turn over and re-baste with marinade sauce. Cook until browned. You may barbeque if desired but do not burn it.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking
1

Boston-style Chinese Food recipes

Yes. Boston style Chinese food is closer to the real "Canton China" Chinese food than other types made in the USA. The sauces in real Cantonese style is dark like in Boston. The taste is sweeter -- unlike that made in New York or Chicago. I had no problems eating food when I was in the Canton area of China because the flavor was the same as when I grew up in the Boston suburbs. The difference is the amount of meat used in the food. In China, they use the parts of the chicken, pork and beef which most people in the USA throw away. They use a lot of grizzle (cartalege) and joints. The amount of beef is minimal compared to the amount of bone which gets sucked and then spit out in China. The parts of the chicken used in China are the wing "tips", feet (or paws) and innard parts like gizzards, hearts and livers. There is more meat used when they cook their Beijjing Duck (we call it Peking - the old name). I would have been shocked to see chicken breasts on a menu anywhere in China. The part of SF you speak about was settled by people of a very old town in S. China. The men went to SF to make enough money to feed their families who were starving. Eventually, those people returned to their S. China town but they left behind their cooking style. It was a good trade. Here is the recipe for Boston style spare ribs.

CHINESE SPARE RIBS
(for approx. 8-10 lb. boneless or bone-in spare ribs)

½ jar hoisin sauce (1 jar = 15 oz.)
½ jar **black bean and garlic sauce (1 jar = 13½ oz.)
⅓ cup whiskey (any brand but Seagram's 7 or Canadian Club are the best and Irish whiskey (Scotch) is not too good)
1 cup granular sugar
½ small bottle of red food coloring (for appearance only)

**You may substitute 1 jar ground bean sauce and add approx. 5 cloves or crushed garlic.

Mix together above ingredients.

Remove excess fat from spare ribs and pour marinade over top. Marinate for 24 hours or prepare ahead and refrigerate for several days or freeze, uncooked for even longer. If you get a side of ribs, take the excess “boneless” meat off the back and remove the excess boney part from the ribs. It is a good snack so don’t throw it away. Marinate it with the gourmet bones.

Bake in hot oven (425 ̊ F) for approx. 15 minutes. Drain off excess fat. Baste with marinade sauce. Continue to cook another 5 minutes or until browned. Turn over and re-baste with marinade sauce. Cook until browned. You may barbeque if desired but do not burn it.

Jun 06, 2013
Hytzipky in Home Cooking