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soleado123's Profile

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"To understand a culture, you must accept their food"

We can't discuss culture via food on this not about food board. It's "tangential"! Everyone knows that a person's culture or the understanding of it have nothing to do with the food they eat. I'm being totally sarcastic, of course. I just put up a post asking for insight into the food culture here in my working class Southern town (USA) and my post was quickly deleted. Yay for censorship... especially for me, a younger person who is desperately searching for some answers or explanation of why things are the way they are - why the culture here supports what it does. The food culture says a lot. I think the statement would be better said, "To know a culture, you must know their food." I can't see accepting the food here in my town, but I do want to understand it and the underlying culture - hard to do around these discussion boards though. :(.

The food culture of this town is fast food, chain family style restaurants, homecooking from convenience and homecooking from scratch (very very rare).

The prevalence of the first three comment for me the acceptance of convenience and size over quality, the lack of interpersonal interaction (drive through windows), the marketability of ANYTHING (poor quality) (you could sell dehydrated water here, LOL), cultural isolation (dumbing down of ethnic dishes even though the economic resources exist here to do an amazing job with them), a love for salty, sweet and sour (which culturally comments a less cultivated interest for food, since many people believe that the taste for bitter foods is learned culturally and not innate)...

Jul 26, 2009
soleado123 in Not About Food

Pork shoulder cooking time?

Howdy y'all,

The weekend before the fourth of July I cooked a Boston butt for the first time. I cooked it outside on a gas grill (for shame ;-) ) @ 350 deg. for four hours. We made pulled pork out of it. Everyone loved it so much that they wanted me to cook one again this weekend. This one is bigger - 12 lbs vs. the other one which was, well - about 2/3's of that size.

I think that some suggest around 30 or 45 min per pound at 350 deg. So, that would mean 6 - 9 hours for that heat level. This time I thought of cooking it at a slower flame - around 250 deg. How would this affect cooking time? Can I estimate how many hours it might take?

Any suggestions? Thanks,

Jonathan.

Aug 15, 2008
soleado123 in Home Cooking

Copying sourdough cultures from baked breads?

Well, I was curious if it is possible. Does the heat/sitting on the shelf de-activate the bacteria? I know that it's possible to buy cultures over the net. I've read that some bakeries/pizza places will sell some sourdough dough too. :O).

Jul 11, 2008
soleado123 in Home Cooking

Eat Nopal's Mexican Recipes

Thank you very much for this recipe. I would often visit Mexican friends' house in high school. They would always serve up some sort of caldo? with chicken, panza or nopal. I tried to figure out how they made it, but I couldn't. I think they did something similar, pureeing tomato and garlic - maybe onion too. I think it was just one roma tomato and one clove of garlic? I think they may have used a fresh jalapeño and bouillon too. I tried fixing the soup the way you've written here, but it was lacking something I was searching for, so I added a little chipotle en adobo. I got that idea from recipes titled caldo tlapeño. I also kept adding things like oregano, a little cheese - I figured it needed more fat, LOL, and lime juice. It tasted good but I can't honestly tell you if that was one step closer to tasting like their soup or something else? :-o I would like to learn to make tacos al pastor, tortillas and some of the salsas. Easy, huh?! :O). So elusive. I've made tortillas with maseca, salsa taquera, casera, verde, de arbol, guajillo - whatever and none of them really made the cut. I can make guacamole and tamales though! The ceviche I made last time wasn't perfect, but was one step closer. :O). The thick crepes I made once with flour and egg were actually more like flour tortillas than crepes and I ate them as tacos. The tortilla must be between like 1 and 2 millimeters, pliable - wrappable with good mouthfeel. Mine end up like little stiff corn pancakes. If you bend em, they break. Salsas should be full flavored I think - always with some elusive chile.

Jul 08, 2008
soleado123 in Home Cooking

Indian ingredients in Metro Atlanta.

Thank you for the help. I am excited now. :O).

Apr 24, 2008
soleado123 in General South Archive

Indian ingredients in Metro Atlanta.

I've been to Your Dekalb several times and would shop there daily if I lived closer, but alas I don't and have to stock up when I'm near there. :O). My friend says he knows the intersection you're talking about, so maybe we can go there. The last time I went to Dekalb, I was looking for curry leaves (never used them before) and couldn't find any.

Apr 20, 2008
soleado123 in General South Archive

Indian ingredients in Metro Atlanta.

Hello everyone,

I'm looking for Indian ingredients in metro Atlanta. Nothing extremely fancy, just things like urad dal, toor dal, amchur (mango) powder and maybe curry leaves. Do you have any recommendations?

Thank you. :O).

Apr 20, 2008
soleado123 in General South Archive

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

"A chain is a monolith that's easy for groups to bash but you can easily find out about them on the internet and download the ingredients of their food. That's an improvement." -MakingSense.

This is if the company has an ingredient statement they publish,. Most don't. Also, in these statements, they twist important details and perceptions around, so that the average consumer thinks things are less harmless or removed from a necessary whole ingredient (less unnecessary) than they are in reality. This practice isn't something I've made up do to some paranoid suspicion, but really exists and is totally observable - practically everywhere.

When chemicals are in all the restaurants, at all the parties, in all my friends homes, how will I ever socialize over food?

A real chef, a real lover of food, etc. will use more whole ingredients. - From real butter to fresh veggies. That's how cooking and eating are supposed to be, and it's not that way in America for the majority. Slow food is the exception, not the rule. There are people out there who think you can only get a cake in a box or bakery (most here already have things prepared in a factory somewhere) I don't call products like that cakes - rather garbage - and there's no snobbishness to that - those boxed/products of alchemy can just be so removed from what a basic cake is - usually flour, sugar, oil, eggs, you know... not very expensive to make).

Apr 17, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

My being annoyed by the current status of what's considered edible or should be administered to human beings in this country is no result of any media saturation. Media generally serves the interest of some group wanting profit; at least the media where I live. Their goal should be informing, but 90% of what an American reads or hears from the TV/Radio/Newspaper is an advertisement. The situation seems as if our entire purpose in life is to be brain fogged overworked mindless consumers of chemicals, gasoline and poor quality movies (note I'm not calling it films or cinema - those are too nice of words). Back to the chemicals and inferior food poseurs... there are thousands of unnecessary chemicals in everything. I'm not sure of where you live, but here, seeking more whole foods is the exception rather than the rule.

The cuisine of the South was mentioned... Here's what I have: how do you like BBQ sauce with high fructose corn syrup, MSG, autolyzed/hydrolyzed extracts, artificial flavors, etc? Do you accept that? Another option is a fish fry... usually frozen fish from Asia grown in ponds with antibiotics, with preservatives, a coating - with preservatives... sauces for dipping - msg, preservatives and HFCS. Shrimp from America here? LOL! It might exist somewhere for richer folks, but what's more widely available is the imported. Even Coke is HFCS and other things. A popular snack cake - preservatives and tons of other conditioners and things. Trust me, I copied 'em down into a text file. That's what folks eat. It's so sad. Chains have taken over, and they serve out chemical slurries. There are many many more chains than non-chain restaurants. Luckily you still see some old timers who aren't in the fast food restaurants - they have their pinto beans, homemade biscuits, pies, etc. They rock.

Apr 17, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

"The OP starts out by attacking the meat content in chicken mcnuggets; then no, it's actually the injectable solution in KFC that is the problem:" - The subject of the 70% chicken chicken has and always has been the Sweet & Spicy Wings from KFC, not the McNuggets. Both products are adulterated beyond comprehension. The ingredients in them are perversions of what's considered edible - they are chemical cocktails and not necessary, tasteful or moral.

Apr 17, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Iron Chef Cat Cora

I like Cat. She's sharp/smart and her dishes are appealing to me.

Apr 16, 2008
soleado123 in Food Media & News

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

When improper food eaten by the average citizen here makes him/her sick, they generally go to a large corporation (a chain store) and buy something to mask those symptoms - or they go to a doctor (who is governed by several business/corporate groups). That product that masks the symptoms is manufactured by a large corporation too. Everything is symbiotic for these groups.

Apr 16, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

Thank you for the well wishes. Don't get me started on the health-care industry here. Haha. Whew. I would like to see an example of one of those additive manufactures helping manufacture "cures" for diseases.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

No, it's no different if... the bread is something like Wonder Bread/Bimbo bread - the table bread of the USA, which have lots of preservatives and dough conditioners. In France, one can go and buy a baguette with ease, right? Bread and it's ingredients are respected. With mechanization creeping in, the government even passed law saying that a place couldn't call itself a boulangerie without doing bread the right way. There's nothing wrong with sauces (one of my favorite things to try to fix) as long as they aren't filled with unnecessary taste enhancers and chemicals. There are more whole convenience foods out there. Most of what's at the typical supermarket though is adulterated. Being surrounded by it is annoying.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

From what I've noticed with the little exposure I've had to the Amish/Mennonites, they eat whole foods. I doubt they add TBHQ, etc. to their food. What might they use? Smoke, salt, pectin. That's so much more understandable than the things on the other ingredients list I pointed out.

There's also something to be said for eating seasonally.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

The adulteration of foods with non-foods is not moral, no matter how widespread it is, and no matter how many consumer dollars are spent on those adulterated products. I seriously doubt that most people who ingest chemical cocktails have taken a closer look at the ingredients. Addiction, price and market saturation are at play.

I'm not a corporate conspiracy theorist. There's no conspiracy or theory in question when the company clearly labels their product as containing unnecessary things.

Sometimes though, companies don't label things clearly, even in the ingredients label. They purposefully label things in misleading ways.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

Miss Needle,

I haven't read that book by Pollan yet. I did look at quite a bit of it in the store though, and I share those frustrations. It's all a matter of staying away from the negative stuff and going for the positive stuff. It's just so frustrating when so many people chose the negative stuff, or have it chosen for them by businesses.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

Thank you for the words of encouragement. :O)

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

"Consumers have chosen to accept food additives for their preservative qualities, nutritional benefit and convenience." - JungMann

No right minded person would accept the plethora of food additives that are everywhere. They are an unnecessary perversion that promotes the security and growth of chemical companies and their associates profits. Being in a chemical wasteland, some consumer's are forced into buying "'health' 'foods'" or factory farmed organics, which only continue putting money into the pockets of corporations, who care nothing except the security and growth of that profit, no matter the cost or perversion.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

I was thinking of the Spicy + Sweet Boneless Chicken wings from KFC. There are many more examples of chicken with solutions (injected)?. I wasn't speaking of the Chicken McNugget, which is perverted as well with unnecessary ingredients. Let us not forget factory farming, which these companies have been accused of by animal rights groups, backed up by actual footage.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

This is exactly what I try to do. However, I have friends and family I visit and I also get together with them for dinner/tete a tetes/parties/eating out. I find I constantly have to explain my reasoning for not wanting to eat something. Ninety percent of the things served are laced with silly chemist lab concoctions. Anytime I go with a friend to the grocer I have to explain to them that I'm not going to eat a certain product because it's just not genuine. The foods are just so offensive and perverted. Now, I know that Italians/Indians/the French do eat junk foods sometimes, depending upon the individual person and everything, but usually when I buy something imported from those places the ingredients are much more whole - without artificial ingredients, taste enhancers, gums/gels, and preservatives. If I'm gonna eat some bread, I want bread, not a chemical slurry. If I want to order a salad in a restaurant, I want a little dressing to go with it that isn't laced with High Fructose Corn Syrup or multiple preservatives. I live in the suburban/rural South. The nearest Trader Joes/Whole Foods is more than an hour away. The farmer's market where the ingredients are of better quality is about an hour and a half. We have mass hypermarket and smaller grocery chains, chain restaurants and little else. It's even hard to get any fresh produce. Weird huh? - With us being rural and all. There are lots of farms, but they're all mostly obese cows and chickens (enclosed). I'm trying to plant a garden this year. I think I'll start a little web site talking about whole foods and giving out cards to friends who wonder why I don't want to eat something. For some reason it seems to confuse people. We are so lucky here to have lots of the ingredients in products listed on the back of them.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

I'm not exaggerating. Well, here's what's in the McDonald's Chicken Nugget. Also, make sure you check out what's in the KFC Sweet + Spicy Boneless Wings.

" Chicken McNuggets®:
White boneless chicken, water, food starch-modified, salt, chicken flavor (autolyzed yeast extract, salt, wheat starch, natural flavoring (botanical source), safflower oil, dextrose, citric acid, rosemary), sodium phosphates, seasoning (canola oil, mono- and diglycerides, natural extractives of rosemary). Battered and breaded with: water, enriched flour (bleached wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), yellow corn flour, food starch-modified, salt, leavening (baking soda, sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium aluminum phosphate, monocalcium phosphate, calcium lactate), spices, wheat starch, whey, corn starch. Prepared in vegetable oil ((may contain one of the following: Canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil, hydrogenated soybean oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, partially hydrogenated corn oil with TBHQ and citric acid added to preserve freshness), dimethylpolysiloxane added as an antifoaming agent). CONTAINS: WHEAT AND MILK"

SOURCE: http://www.mcdonalds.com/app_controll...

KFC Sweet & Spicy Boneless Wings:

"Chicken: Wing Shaped White Chicken Fritter Pieces Containing: Up to 31% of a Solution of Water,
Seasoning (Salt, Monosodium Glutamate, Garlic Powder, Spice Extractives, and Onion Powder), Soy Protein
Concentrate, Rice Starch, Sodium Phosphates. Battered with: Water, Wheat Flour, Leavening (Sodium
Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Monocalcium Phosphate), Salt, Dextrose, and Monosodium
Glutamate. Breaded With: Wheat Flour, Salt, Soy Flour, Leavening (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate and
Sodium Bicarbonate), Monosodium Glutamate, Nonfat Dry Milk, Dextrose, Extractives of Tumeric and
Extractives of Annatto. Predusted With: Wheat Flour, Wheat Gluten, Salt, Dried Egg Whites, Leavening
(Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, and Sodium Bicarbonate), Monosodium Glutamate and Spice, Breading set in
Vegetable Oil. Sauce: Sugar, Maltodextrin, Brown Sugar, Honey Solids, Salt, Modified Corn Starch, Malic
Acid, Sodium Acetate, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean and Cottonseed Oil, Less than 2% Calcium Silicate
Added (as Anti-Caking Agent), Natural and Artificial Flavors, Beet Powder, Spices, Caramel Color, Vinegar
Solids, Extractives pf Paprika, Green Pepper Juice Solids, and FD&C Red No. 40.
Contains Egg, Milk, Wheat and Soy."

Source: KFC's Web Site.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

I'm so glad you chose to mention McDonald's and Subway, as these two companies have ingredient statements. Let's say I'm the ignorant consumer and decide I want to eat "healthily" (LOL - wait, it's totally not funny) and waltz into the nearest McDonald's and order a grilled chicken sandwich. What should I expect? A bun made of wheat, yeast, salt, water... chicken - grilled, maybe with a marinade or a few spices, huh? Maybe some toppings - mayo - which should be oil, eggs, lemon juice, spices, etc... Well, it's totally not that way at McDonald's. Here's what you get, and I'm quoting this from their website for educational reasons.

" Honey Wheat Roll:
Enriched flour (bleached wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, whole wheat flour, dry honey blend (honey, high fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, corn syrup, wheat starch), sugar, yeast, contains 2% or less of the following: soybean oil, canola oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, salt, wheat gluten, calcium sulfate, potassium iodate, l. cysteine, monocalcium phosphate, dough conditioners (may contain one or more of the following: sodium stearoyl lactylate, DATEM, ascorbic acid, calcium peroxide, enzymes, azodicarbonamide, distilled monoglycerides, mono- and diglycerides), calcium propionate (preservative), soy lecithin. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOY"

" Chicken breast filets with rib meat, water, seasoning (salt, sugar, food starch-modified, maltodextrin, spices, dextrose, autolyzed yeast extract, hydrolyzed [corn gluten, soy, wheat gluten] proteins, garlic powder, paprika, chicken fat, chicken broth, natural flavors (plant and animal source), caramel color, polysorbate 80, xanthan gum, onion powder, extractives of paprika), modified potato starch, and sodium phosphates. CONTAINS: SOY AND WHEAT. Prepared with Liquid Margarine: Liquid soybean oil, water, partially hydrogenated cottonseed and soybean oils, salt, hydrogenated cottonseed oil, soy lecithin, mono- and diglycerides, sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate (preservative), artificial flavor, citric acid, vitamin A palmitate, beta carotene (color). CONTAINS: SOY LECITHIN"

" Mayonnaise Dressing:
Water, soybean oil, maltodextrin, distilled vinegar, egg yolks, modified tapioca starch, modified egg yolks, salt, sugar, food starch-modified, xanthan gum, spice, potassium sorbate (preservative), lemon juice concentrate, polysorbate 80, calcium disodium EDTA, natural flavor (animal source), beta carotene (color). CONTAINS: EGG"

SOURCE: http://www.mcdonalds.com/app_controll...

It's absurd. Oh, and Subway has interesting things in their bread. Just look up their ingredient statement as well.

Apr 15, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

Why do people accept chemical cocktails as food?

When did our culinary atmosphere here in the United States start accepting chemical cocktails AKA faux foods - foodstuffs -inferior food as staples of everyday life? Go into any convenience store and you can get chips. What does one expect? Some fried potatoes with salt? Oh no, they have to have at least twenty ingredients. Go to the nearest fast food "restaurant" (which are everywhere) and order some "chicken" - if it has under thirty ingredients and is at least 70 % actual chicken, we'll... give the person who found that some sort of award! The chains add what they want to whatever it seems, as long as they can decrease the time from "kitchen" to patron, increase mouth-feel or "addictiveness" - sweets/fats.

I'm bothered by the cornucopia of chemical cocktails that surround us here in America. They're found everywhere. I'm talking about the ones that are labeled as "food." We are surrounded by fast "food" restaurants. Also, supermarkets are overflowing with boxed this and that. You want something freshly made? Why not head over to the deli counter? There, they will have salads and dishes full of every possible chemical preservative and "taste enhancer" possible. Around Christmas time I was trying to find some licorice candy for my dad. A lady wouldn't buy some certain candy because it was manufactured in China. I have no bias against the country - I've even been there and eat Asian market foods imported from there too. I wondered, though, if she's aware that many of the preservatives/chemicals found throughout the grocery store/convenience store/wherever are manufactured over there? Those chemicals/derived substances are put in thousands upon thousands of products that are the "food" here in the USA. That same "food" is fed/administered to us, human beings.

What ever happened to simple, honest, whole foods? Did they even exist in wide spread society? I'm 21. I think they were supposed to have existed in my great-grandmother's days. Is this true, or just a chimera?

Apr 14, 2008
soleado123 in Not About Food

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

I stuck some from the Asian market in the ground... They are the best growing thing in the garden. Cut and come again... they grow back so quickly... :O).

Mar 20, 2008
soleado123 in Home Cooking

Fruit dish identification. Candied yellow breadfruit layers?

I bought some canned Jackfruit to try to see if it was it. I don't think it was the same thing. Hmm.

Mar 11, 2008
soleado123 in China & Southeast Asia

Fruit dish identification. Candied yellow breadfruit layers?

Hello,

I few years ago in China I had a dish that I'm still trying to figure out. I think it may have been candied? steamed yellow breadfruit in layers. I bought a breadfruit, but it was immature and nothing like the yellow fruit I'm speaking of. This fruit? looked similar to a pineapple inside, but it was sticky and peeled off in layers. I'm sure I had this around Shanghai and other places. Do you know what I'm talking about?

Here are some pictures. This looks quite similar, but the breadfruit is cut into chunks and not layered... http://www.ntbg.org/breadfruit/uses/images/processed1.jpg

Is this it? :O).

I also found a recipe for some candied breadfruit, but I wonder if I could just get a ripe yellow (inside) breadfruit and steam it...

Here is the link to the recipe. http://starbulletin.com/97/07/30/feat... It's the third recipe on the page.

I was just looking for some sort of confirmation.

Mar 11, 2008
soleado123 in China & Southeast Asia

Papalote-Inspired Salsa

The name Papalote reminds me of an herb I've heard of: Papaloquelite, which also might be known as Papalo. Who knows? They might put that in there.

Feb 14, 2008
soleado123 in Recipes

Papalote-Inspired Salsa

Aidam. Thanks for the help. I will be sure to try this again with tomatoes this summer. Fresh tomatoes are at their "state of grace" for a short period, before they start getting mushy and smelling really bad. Thanks again. :).

Feb 14, 2008
soleado123 in Recipes

Lentils grainy!?! :( Dal Makhani, Split Pea Soup

I will try again... :).

Feb 14, 2008
soleado123 in Home Cooking