c

ChefNet's Profile

Title Last Reply

"Neighborhood" Italian ...?

In Tribeca: Pepolino on West Broadway just below Canal St.

In West Village: Malatesta on Christopher & Washington

Both have outdoor seating, Malatesta was my favorite, but Pepolino is stealing my heart!

Jun 09, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

Question about LANDMARC (Tribeca)

Don't know if I'd say "really uncomfortable" though during very busy times it can get a bit loud and crowded... usually it's worth it.

Best thing to do would be to go during non-peak hours... they serve straight through from lunch to dinner. Also, in non-peak you might be able to get a bigger table to yourself.

Good luck & Enjoy!

Jun 02, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

Strange Pairings that Taste Uncommonly Good

I like to put pickled jalepeno slices with peanut butter on toast.

May 26, 2007
ChefNet in General Topics

What else is "Americanized"?

Fara's right... Italians don't eat breakfasts like that, they typically have espresso or cappucino (only at breakfast) and some kind of bread. Some eat something a bit more substantial a couple of hours later, but still nothing like American breakfast.

May 18, 2007
ChefNet in General Topics

What else is "Americanized"?

I agree with you on that point. However, for most of the immigrants from the "Mezzogiorno" in the late 19th/early 20th century, bread and eggs WERE considered an abundance. Pasta was a food for feast days that was only consumed a few times each year.

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in General Topics

What else is "Americanized"?

I'll begin by saying that when I use the term "Americanize" I do not mean "dummying down" or other negative connotation. I use the term to mean modifications and substitutions made in the course of translation from one culture to another.

American foods like spaghetti and meatballs and veal parmesan were never found in Italy. They were invented here, out of necessity, availability, and the fantasy/ideals of the immigrants who were, for the first time able to enjoy the abundance America had to offer. Even red sauce is only roughly translated from Italian.

The NYC restaurants that serve "essentially identical" dishes (to those found in Italy) are not representative of what you will find anywhere outside the immediate area... even here, most accommodate American palates and appetites, as well as the American marketplace and seasonality... therefore Americanizing authentic-style cuisine.

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in General Topics

bay ridge chinese delivery

Just moved to Park Slope and I really miss Chopstix... I haven't found Chinese delivery here that is even close.

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in Outer Boroughs

foreign guests want "local" cuisine

(my last reply seems to be lost, so I'll try again)

What about Blue Hill?

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

What else is "Americanized"?

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Italians that came to N America were mostly poor and starving and "Italy" was still a new concept. The majority of the immigrants in that era created a cuisine based on cultural ideals they brought with them and ingredients that were new, and most could never have afforded in their home land. It might be argued that what we consider to be "Italian-American" is really American as interpretted by the Italian immigrants.

Modern Italian (the "Italian-Italian") however, since utilizing American ingredients, would probably better represent the term "Italian-American" as its preparation and presentation, though essentially authentic, is crafted for an American market.

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in General Topics

Pine Ridge wines

Sorry to take so long with a reply... The most obvious outward change since the buy-out has been to the retail/hospitality facility. Instead of the casual, boisterous, friendly atmosphere of the past, the hospitality area has gone the way of the chic, ultra-premium wineries (a very Napa thing, IMO)... instead of picnics and swings, you are stopped at the door by a concierge desk, the retail area is no longer bright with art, posters, and gift items (not a huge loss on the last part)... it's more subtle... and tastings are much more expensive, less comfortable and a bit less friendly. This is a noticable departure from the Andrus' convivial style.

The low-end wines seem to be phasing out with less of the PRW style showing through (ie. the chenin blanc-viognier - do they still make it? Can't seem to find it here in NYC).

Quality on the upper end seems to be steady, if not improving. I'll miss the old Howell Mountains... and the old prices! I've always been a big PRW fan, and probably always will be.

May 17, 2007
ChefNet in Wine

Pine Ridge wines

Stacy Clark has been making wine at Pine Ridge for over 20 years. Though Gary Andrus was the name behind them, she was the one reponsible for most of the best vintages of the 90's... still is. Though corporate ownership has had an impact on the winery, the cabernets, at least, have not been diminished.

May 11, 2007
ChefNet in Wine

Next weekend downtown

I definitely recommend Landmarc (179 Broadway) for brunch but they don't take reservations. Happy Anniversary... have fun!

May 11, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

If you could have only one NOT Non-Stick Pan which one would it be?

I use a 1 1/2 quart Viking Saucier. It's super-heavy and has so many uses... deep enough for liquid cooking, sloped sides for sauteeing, comes with a lid if you need one. If I only had one pan in my kitchen, this would be it.

May 04, 2007
ChefNet in Cookware

I can never have too many.....?

heat resistant spatulas (in lots of bright colors), small non-stick saute pans from the restaurant suply store, white "bar mop" style towels, ramekins (or small bowls) for mis en place, olives, nuts, dips, etc...

May 03, 2007
ChefNet in Cookware

Dinner Monday night near Ground Zero - suggestion?

Definitely Landmarc. It's only a short (less than 8 blocks) walk from Ground Zero, up West Broadway... but they don't take reservations so if you arrive during peak brunch time on the weekends, or after 7 any other night, be prepared for a wait (but it's worth it!).

May 03, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

Diner breakfast between American Canyon and Sonoma?

It may be a little out of the way, but worth the detour to go into downtown Napa. It's been a while since I've lived there but I used to love ABC Bakery's breakfasts... excellent baked goods AND diner-type breakfasts. Other bakery option... Sweetie Pie's (also in downtown Napa).

Enjoy!

$100pp (including wine) tasting menu for 10?

The chef's table at Barbutto is a lot of fun... I went with 7 friends on a Saturday night recently, we drank plenty of good wine and got out of there for $85 pp including 20% auto grat. The food was rustic, plentiful, and very tasty. The atmosphere is casual, lively, Meat Packing District style.

Apr 25, 2007
ChefNet in Manhattan

First thing you made with your new stand mixer?

I went on a cookie frenzy! First I made Nestle Toll House cookies, then a couple of different biscotti recipes. By the time the frenzy was over, I had 17 different kinds of cookies in the house.

Apr 25, 2007
ChefNet in Cookware