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Good quality wooden spoons?

Hmmm...TBH- my favorites are the ones that I bought before college and are so worn that one of the "corners" are now flattened from so much stirring over the years. They are so well seasoned, they seem indestructable at this point.

BUT, every time I visit my mother I really like the ones I bought her from Williams-Sonoma a few years back (maybe 10 years?) - they look just like new and have kept their shape well. I know that she uses them often.

Oct 11, 2009
jazzy77 in Cookware

"Cooking Channel" Coming in 2010

Hmmm...like I said, I hadn't seen them all either, but I still chuckle at the episode where he was in an Asian country and he was playing a drinking version of spin the bottle with a chicken head. While that type of humor isn't really up my alley, his attitude towards it was incredibly funny (as in "play nicely...but, for heaven's sake, don't touch the unsanitary chicken head!"). David Sedaris once wrote a story where he mentioned that a person could tell a lot about a culture by the sounds their animals make and their version of the Santa Claus story - I imagine the same idea could be applied to drinking games and bar culture.

Oct 11, 2009
jazzy77 in Food Media & News

"Cooking Channel" Coming in 2010

Now, I've only watched a couple episodes of Three Sheets, but I did enjoy it. I like shows that specialize in food-related cultural experiences, and the show is enjoyable. I do think it was a little light on "education" and a little heavy on "entertainment," but a little more research would help that.

But, then I've also been a long time"No Reservations" fan which is now only mildly about food...so maybe we have a natural difference of opinion?

Oct 11, 2009
jazzy77 in Food Media & News

Gourmet magazine to close

I'm so, so sad to hear that Gourmet will close down. I really look forward to the magazine in the mail every month. I've recently cleared out all my "old" magazines from my pantry, but kept every single one of the Gourmet magazines because they are so full of wonderful information and recipes.

Oct 05, 2009
jazzy77 in Food Media & News

HELP Find Clark's Teaberry Gum Triangle Area NC

Try the Jack Daniel's gas station in Cary off of Jones Franklin, near where Western and Buck Jones meet up. They have a great penny candy section, and I've seen it there quite a few times.

Oh my, I used to love teaberry, black jack, AND clove when I was a kid, but teaberry was my fave.

www.trianglelocavore.wordpress.com

Aug 27, 2009
jazzy77 in Southeast

Favorite cocktail in Durham/Chapel Hill

I asked the bar tender at Watt's Grocery to make me a Bocce Ball with blood orange juice last weekend and it was absolutely the most perfect brunch cocktail.

Other than that, I thoroughtly enjoyed the Carolina Julep at the Pit in Raleigh, although I wish they hadn't muddled the mint. Semi-traditional (note the muddling, not the use of mint syrup) julep with a nice bourbon twang and a hint of peach at the end. That and some Q was a nice end to a long, hot day.

http://trianglelocavore.wordpress.com/

Aug 23, 2009
jazzy77 in General South Archive

Ohio Buckeye cookies

If you cover the exposed area, then I would think of it as more of a bon-bon, not a buckeye.... Small difference, I know....

Jun 10, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Thanks for the idea, but unfortunately I've been looking for a way to store the fruit in my pantry, as I live in an apartment and do not have a large freezer (and it is usually filled with stock and other things I don't have the ability to can).

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

What grind for a Bialetti?

From my understanding, what comes out of your Bialetti will be espresso because it is still a steam-infused preparation. The espresso grind is fine, although you can adjust that for taste as you like. Coarser for a little weaker product, and finer for a stronger.

I was just getting ready to get my "no name Bialetti" out for an affogato de frozen custard spin tonight. So, I think what will come out of mine is, at least for tonight, an "ice cream sauce." :-)

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

baked goods that go well with beer?

My FIL always takes us to Mulberry Street in Brick, NJ. They have bags of them in large circles, but you can also buy them in a smaller shape that resembles those magnetic ribbons that people like to put on the back of their cars. I like the big circles because they are really crunchy, but the little ones are awesome with small segments of smoked fresh mozzerella.

Here's the website - I've never seen the taralli on the website - maybe they aren't considered "gourmet" enough:
http://www.mulberrystreet.net/index.p...

Salami.com also has the little ones:
http://www.salami.com/ordereze/Produc...

Oh, and if you ask someone in NJ about them, they are pronounced "tah-rells", with a slight roll on the "r."

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

baked goods that go well with beer?

Pastillage beer bongs would be a hit I think - what a great concept.

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Okay, between your post and the article for stewed rhubarb above, I'm going to go with this preparation. I'll let you all know how it turns out!

Thanks for the processing time for the 1/2 pint jar!

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

baked goods that go well with beer?

Taralli are my favorite snacks to eat with beer. They are like crunchy, little golden pretzels with fennel, red pepper, or black pepper. My favorite is fennel. When I get to NJ to visit my husband's family I come back with bags of them.

http://ciaoitalia.com/Recipes.aspx?id...

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

what's your favorite sandwich?

El Habanero - incredibly good. I had to look it up on a previous posting, since it was recommended on Chowhound. My husband had that sandwich and I all but abandoned my entree to "help" him eat it - it was perfect with the fresh watermelon juice they had that day.

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Yes - I hadn't thought about the yolks in the curd...I think that would have immediately gotten nixed once I start looking at recipes.

Okay, maybe I need to start thinking about stewed rhubarb; there's an article here (thanks Apple!). It calls for a 15 minute processing time for a water bath....

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_02/r...

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Ohio Buckeye cookies

I tend to store them in the fridge (I like to eat them cold, straight from the cookie tin), but they can handle being out for a while on a table for a long while. There isn't anything in them that can't sit out.

Just a note though, these tend to be fall/winter candies (in Ohio) - so I'm not sure how they would do outside in summertime conditions....

Jun 07, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Ohio Buckeye cookies

I found my recipe already typed out! I must have already given it to someone sinced it's pretty detailed. Here it is:

1 large jar peanut butter
1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
Vanilla
2-3 bags of Confectioner’s sugar (powdered sugar)
Melted butter (as necessary)
36 oz. Nestle’s Semisweet Chocolate chips
1 block of Paraffin Wax
Toothpicks
Double boiler (glass bowl over a simmering pan of water)
Wax paper

Place 1 stick of butter in a mixing bowl and mix until soft. Add in all of the peanut butter. Let it mix until all the ingredients are incorporated and heterogeneous. Add in a splash of vanilla. Add in most of one bag of confectioner’s sugar and mix it up until it forms a dough.

When the dough is solid enough to handle you can put it out on a counter, or board, to knead. (Make sure you cover the surface with powdered sugar!) Knead the dough for a few minutes, adding the powdered sugar-or butter- as needed to adjust for dryness or wetness. The ideal mixture will be something you can roll in your hands without being sticky. It should hold the shape of a ball without drooping, but not be dry to the taste- and it shouldn’t ever be crumbly. (Something like marzipan.) If the dough is too wet, add more sugar. It it’s too dry, add some more melted butter. When the dough has a consistency that you like (and is not too soft/not too dry/can make a finite ball without drooping/tastes good), you can stop kneading.

Pinch a small amount of dough off the large ball and make a smaller ball. Most people prefer smaller buckeyes to larger ones- I would say you would want something the size of a quarter, but they’re your buckeyes- make them the size of Christmas ornaments if that’s what you really desire (but you’ll need something larger than a toothpick to dip those!). I like to measure mine out with a tablespoon and then roll into a round ball. Place balls on a plate or cookie sheet.

Put the balls in the refrigerator to chill thoroughly. Sit down and watch a football game or read a book. Make some other cookies. I’ve put them in the freezer for an hour during rather impatient moments. Nevertheless, they need to chill thoroughly.

Melt your chocolate in a double boiler . Add some slivers of the paraffin wax to the melted chocolate to thin it. You know the consistency is correct when you lift the spoon or spatula out of the chocolate and there is a fine line of chocolate falling back into the pan leaving a three-count line in the choclate before dissappearing. Stick a toothpick into the top of the peanut butter centers and stick the center into the chocolate to coat everything BUT a small bit at the top (so it looks like a buckeye). Put the buckeye on the wax paper to dry. Eat. Enjoy.

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Ohio Buckeye cookies

I grew up in Ohio and have made them every Christmas for as long as I can remember, no exceptions - some of my earliest holiday memories were being a kid helping my mom roll platters laden with pb centers.

As far as consistency of size, I just measure out a tablespoon of the peanut filling and roll them into rounds with my hands (dusted with powdered sugar).

The toothpick is just what people have always had around to dip the peanut centers - there is no special tool necessary or recommended. The only thing that I recommend is storing the centers in the fridge for a little while so they get nice and cold before you try to dip them. They will stick to the toothpick better. And they release better from waxed paper.

I always dip mine using Nestle's chocolate chips with paraffin - people make a face when I tell them that the shiny, thin, crisp chocolate coating is because I put a significant amount of paraffin in the chocolate before covering, but that hasn't once deterred anyone from gobbling them down. IMHO (and I admit I'm picky) eliminating the paraffin affects both the taste and texture negatively, but, if you ask ten Ohioans how they make their buckeyes you'll get ten different answers.

Lastly, don't bother buying expensive chocolate or pb to make them - I used Callebaut and organic pb once and they weren't even edible. Jif creamy or crunchy and Nestle's chocolate...and the paraffin.

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

what's your favorite sandwich?

I had a garlicky roasted pork sandwich in Sarasota, FL that I just love to re-create. I haven't quite been able to mimic the intensity of the garlic yet, but I'm getting there. Literally it's pork butt that has been roasted with about 20 cloves of garlic. The pork is "picked" and some of the juices are saved in a bowl. The "roasted" garlic is mashed up in the bowl with the juices and some more raw, minced garlic is added to the mixture with a significant amount of pepper. All of this is mixed back in with the shredded pork. Place on a hoagie roll (or Cuban bread, if you can get it), topped with pickles (for some acidity), and then toasted in a sandwich press. Fantastic.

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

48 Eggs From Hens Out In The Country

Giada De Laurentiis has a phenomenal dish that uses egg "crepes" - I highly recommend it. I've used it to make spinach stuffed "crepes" as well.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/gi...

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

48 Eggs From Hens Out In The Country

Pickled eggs are fantastic - I highly recommend them. I actually "dye" my eggs with a little beet juice as well - it's a good use for pickled beet juice and completely nostalgic from when I used to eat them as a kid.

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Thanks, I've not seen this website before....

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Thanks for your concern - I've done a lot of canning jams, jellies, and fruit butters but am wanting to do something other than that (we already have more jams and jellies than I can shake a stick at). I was hoping to can some "rhubarb curd" or something like that - you know, for those emergency situations when you want some tasty rhubarb, but not a whole pie sitting around?

I'll go check out the Ball Canning Book and see if they have what I think I'm looking for. I don't have a pressure canner so I want to make sure whatever I'm doing can be properly done using the water bath method. I still don't have the whole chemistry thing down yet with what can be canned in a water bath vs. a pressure cooker.

Jun 06, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

Canning rhubarb?

Hey all,

I have a big bag of rhubarb in the freezer that keeps calling my name. Does anyone have any recipes where I could can (in a water bath, not a pressure canner) some sort of rhubarb jam or curd? I've been looking online for recipes, but am sort of new to the canning thing and am not sure what would be safe to can.

Thanks for any advice!

May 31, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

This weekend at NC fairgrounds in Raleigh

We went with another couple - I forgot about the Pig Jig, but we were well served inside the exhibition hall. Mostly we hit the NC wines, which really impressed me. I have to say that there was a time when you had to taste a lot of "bad" wine in the South to really find a good one, but we could have walked out of there with more than we could carry if not for finite amount of cash in our wallets. Kudos to all the wine makers in NC!

Mackey's Ferry peanut butter is incredibly tasty- I wish I had picked up a bottle.

And I've always wanted to taste souse and Neese's liver pudding, but never had the guts to buy it at the store. I was so glad they were sampling it! The liver pudding is quite tasty; the souse...ummm...I couldn't get past the texture.

Anyway, the festival was a really wonderful idea and I'm glad the Ag Department held it.

http://trianglelocavore.wordpress.com/

May 31, 2009
jazzy77 in General South Archive

Western Wake Farmer's Market (Triangle, NC)

I just wanted to recommend a really fantastic new farmer's market that just opened in Cary near Davis Drive and Morrisville-Carpenter Road (in the Carpenter Village area).

I've been there the last two weekends and have been really impressed. It's a little smaller than Durham or Carrboro, but there are some really great meat and veggie vendors - and even a seafood vendor. I didn't even have to go to the grocery store this weekend - yay!

Last week, we tried a roast from Smith Angus Farm and, I swear, it was the best piece of beef I've ever eaten.

This week we bought some triggerfish from the seafood vendor, which I hadn't tried before - it was fantastic. We fried it up in a white cornmeal crust ( the cornmeal was sourced and milled locally and purchased at the market), and served it with some swiss chard (again, from the market) and rice (not from the market).

Later this week we will be eating jalapeno pork sausage and kale over goat cheese grits - all purchased this weekend (from the market).

For more info and a vendor list: http://www.westernwakefarmersmarket.org/

May 11, 2009
jazzy77 in General South Archive

ISO Strawberry Preserve Recipe

Hi All,

It's strawberry season in NC! Before I head off to go berry picking, I want to be armed with a really great preserve recipe. The recipes in the pectin boxes have left me a little dissapointed lately - I'm searching for something semi-soft with chunks of berries and not too sweet.

If I'm lucky I will be able to introduce some rhubarb into the mix too, so any strawberry-rhubard preserve recipes would be most appreciated as well.

Thanks!

May 11, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking

anywhere between Florida to Virginia close to 95

I empathize with you completely. We totally blew past the place TWICE before we drove further into town and had to ask a nice man at a corner gas station to give us directions.

May 11, 2009
jazzy77 in General South Archive

Durham, NC OnlyBurger Truck Rides Again

Since we don't live in Durham and I work near Capital Blvd., we haven't gotten a chance to try it again, but what a dissapointment hearing the rest of the reviews! I do have to say that the burger that I had in my original review was far, far better than the ones I've had at Five Guys since and it's sad to hear they haven't maintained the same quality.

I don't mind shelling out the money if the food is better than the average burger joint, but I'd have a problem waiting the 30 mins. outside of the truck for my order...unless they were in the parking lot of the Duke Gardens or something equally enjoyable.

May 11, 2009
jazzy77 in General South Archive

Ina Garten's Orange Marmalade

I have a "good-quality" mandoline, but it choked in the oranges. No matter, a sharp knife took care of them easy. The marmalade turned out beautifully and is quite tasty - almost caramel-flavored.

And now it's strawberry season in NC, and I'm looking forward to making strawberry-lemon preserves!

May 11, 2009
jazzy77 in Home Cooking