jubilant cerise's Profile

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My, how could that taste so awful?

I discovered a new horrible food item: So Delicious dairy free yogurt. It's coconut based and I love coconut, so I tried this out of curiosity (I'm omnivore).

It has a weird, thick texture worse than eating a heaping spoonful of lard. I had to gag it down. I gave it a second try with my homemade granola in the hopes I could finish the container but even that couldn't save this yogurt. I don't toss food easily but this went in the garbage fast.

One of my co-workers who's dairy-free said the same thing about it, without me even starting the convo about it, so I know it's not just me.

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

Yes, I saw from the map of the area I'd be near Chinatown so thanks for the Rangoon recommendation, excited to check it out!

Jan 14, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

Your recs sound fabulous too, cwdonald - it sounds like I'm headed for some great eats!

Jan 14, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

Thanks, bluehensfan! This is pretty much around the corner from my hotel, so this is perfect.

Jan 14, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

I'm omnivore and open to trying all cuisines. I've been checking out your recs and they look like a great start, thank you!

Jan 14, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

Hotel in Centre City is near North Broad and Vine St.

In Kensington I'll be around in Fish Town - the sculpture gym looks neat!

Jan 14, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

Stopover in Philly - where to eat?

I'm excited to be visiting for the first time! Unfortunately it's short - an evening plus the next day before heading out again in the late afternoon. Where can this lone traveller get some tasty and reasonably affordable eats? Recs for local coffee/tea shops, bakeries and delis/ethnic grocery shops are welcome as well.

My hotel is near Center City and I don't drive, so walking distance is preferable. I will be in the Kensington area for part of my stopover as well, so if it's along the public transit routes between these areas that would work, too.

Thanks in advance for your recs!

Jan 09, 2014
jubilant cerise in Philadelphia

perfect and easy gluten-free vegan cupcake recipe?

Thanks, Ruthie789. I picked up a gluten-free flour mix that claims to be interchangeable with most basic baking recipes, so I might be able to mod the coconut one. Also reminds me that there's a couple of local vegan cookbooks I should look into. :)

perfect and easy gluten-free vegan cupcake recipe?

Hi Ecobaker, thanks so much for the modified Betty Crocker recipe and links. Checking them all out right now!

perfect and easy gluten-free vegan cupcake recipe?

Just like the title says! :) Plus it'd be great if it'll hold up for at least 24 hours as I can't bake on the day of my event - it's on a weekday night so I'm planning to bake the night before and bring them to work so I can go straight to my event and will ice them on location.

I'm pretty new to vegan baking but want to be able to offer my vegan friends a treat. Some of my friends are omnivores so I'd like all the treats to be tasty to minimize the amount of baking I need to do or the possibility of cross-contamination (especially with the gluten-free stuff). There's probably only going to be a dozen people at best and I'm already going to be making some snickerdoodles and a banana loaf. Thanks for your help!

gift fair food vendor tips?

Thanks for the info, cleobeach! Over the years, I've tried eating and gifting what I make and still end up with a lot left over - not a bad thing, since it keeps anyways but the problem is that I like making preserves so I inevitably end up with a lot. So I was thinking, why not give selling a try? Will think about all of this some more but now I don't feel so bad about making sure I have enough - if I sell out, then that's a good thing and I won't be stressed out trying to have a lot of stuff stocked up especially since this is really just a hobby for me and I want this to be a fun experience.

gift fair food vendor tips?

Hi Quine!

A gift fair is pretty much like a farmer's market, or arts & crafts sale. And yes, I've already looked into the local health codes to ensure the food items are safe for public sale and consumption. Haven't poisoned myself or anyone I've gifted my preserves to (and I'm quite sure I'd be told, lol!) and I've been considering markets for a little while now, so maybe this is the year to do it.

When you say it's not easy, is there something specific you're thinking of?

gift fair food vendor tips?

I've been getting some encouragement to sell my homemade preserves at a local gift fair for Christmas and wondering if it's worth the trouble. I have no idea how much stuff to make, whether to offer samples or not, etc. I also bake but wonder if having two different kinds of items would be confusing as well as too much work for little return. I don't really have a lot of money to spend on this so I'd definitely like to not be in the hole afterwards. Thanks in advance for your advice and suggestions!

"Least Favorite Vegetable" Poll

I didn't have too many childhood vegetable foes. I now like eggplant and am pretty sure I'll overcome these last two if I can find recipes that work for them:

Bitter melon - as mention in my reply to CoachJ's shared dislike of it. The Asian Grandmother's Cookbook blog has a recipe for a miso-based chili that I quite like AND I think bitter melon would actually work really well in it.

Okra - furry outside, slimy inside... why would this be good to eat? I've had gumbo and was ok with it there, since it's a stew and everything is a big ol' jumble of flavours. I'm also intrigued by a recipe I saw once of breading it and either baking or frying it. That should take care of the slime factor!

"Least Favorite Vegetable" Poll

When I was a kid, bitter melon stew was unfortunately on the menu at home one too many times. Yeah, I know! - who tastes that vegetable and thinks it would make an awesome stew? And it's chock-a-block full of bitter melon. Yuck.

But you know what's funny? I made a miso chili recipe (http://theasiangrandmotherscookbook.w...) and since the person who writes the blog that I found the recipe on was was thinking about how to make an Asian-inspired chili, the first thing I thought was bitter melon - in very, very, very, very, small quantities - would be good in it. I know they sell it at my local Chinatown, so when I make this chili again I'm going to try it with bitter melon, one of my few childhood vegetable foes. :)

how to solve a problem like a quince

Hey missclawdy! Sorry I didn't see your request sooner, I kind of fell off Chowhound for a bit.

I've made quince jelly only a couple of times and have been happy with the results. I'm not sure why yours turned into syrup - maybe it was cooked too long? Last fall I experimented with some leftover peels and cores in my crockpot and got syrup instead of jelly. Overcooking is my guess but I don't know for sure.

The recipe I use is from the 1977 edition of Reader's Digest's Creative Cooking (admittedly not a gourmet book but it's one of my few connections to home). The jelly is a beautiful dark red-orange colour. I also tried a recipe using added pectin and it ends up a light pink-peach colour; I think that recipe was in the booklet included with the canning jars. I don't remember it tasting too different so it may just be a matter of what colour you prefer.

Here's my abbreviated version of the RD recipe (I just pared down their instructions and added some notes of my own):

2 lbs quince
7.5 cups water
1 tbsp citric acid (I used fresh lemon juice)
sugar (depends on yield of extracted quince juice)

Chop, mince or grate fruit - no need to peel or core, you want the pectin from all of these parts. However, fresh quince is fuzzy and very hard - wash first and be sure to have a really good sharp knife. Simmer all chopped fruit (seeds, peels, cores and all) on gentle heat in only 5 cups of water until very soft and tender (maybe an hour?).

Strain through at least three layers of cheesecloth for 15 minutes into a large bowl. Do not squeeze or you'll end up with cloudy jelly.

Add the fruit pulp back to the pot with the remaining 2.5 cups of water, simmer for 30 minutes and strain for 1 hour. Mix the two extracts together and measure the number of cups you have - for every 2 cups of juice, use 2-2.5 cups of sugar.

Bring the juice and sugar to a rapid boil for about 10 minutes or until set point is reached. Pour jelly into sterilized jars, seal and process in a canner.

The last time I made this jelly was two years ago, so I don't remember how many jars it yielded in the end, sorry. (Last year I made quincesauce with the quinces by mixing them with apples from the yard, hence the peels and cores experiment.)

Hope your jelly turns out lovely! Here's a photo of mine - in the quince tree the fruit came from :)

Apr 02, 2012
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

What are you baking these days? February 2012, part deux! [old]

I made Finnish pancakes for the first time and my partner said they're restaurant worthy. He's never said that about anything I've made (I'm not a bad cook, honest) so this one's a keeper for sure! The closest thing I can compare it to is a Yorkshire pudding that's really large, squishy and sweet. So good with butter and homemade jam.

This apparently isn't a traditional recipe but I choose it because I had a jar of crystallized honey that I wanted to use up: http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,195,1...

The instructions for the cooking vessel are a little vague so after some internet sleuthing, I used the largest dish I own - a 10" x 15" Pyrex dish with 3" sides - and it was the perfect size. The second time I halved the recipe and used the 8" square Pyrex with equal results. Except that they're so tasty I'll be making the full amount the next time! :)

Feb 29, 2012
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

Timeframe for a brined chicken

Ooh, crispier skin - thanks for the tip! I'm going to slide some lemon and herbed butter under the skin too, there's sage in the backyard that refuses to die, gotta use it for something! So looking forward to dinner tonight!

Nov 19, 2011
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

Timeframe for a brined chicken

Can a brined whole chicken be drained then kept in the fridge for another day or so? I'm way busier than usual this week after work and I don't think I'll be able to roast it up until tomorrow or Saturday. It's my first purchase from my BIL's farm so I'm pretty excited about it and don't want to screw it up.

Nov 17, 2011
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

how to solve a problem like a quince

So they'll last even though they've split?

No frost yet - just cold (around 10 degrees Celsius) and rainy for the past several weeks. I'm on the Canadian westcoast so the fall and winter weather here is pretty mild. I've picked the quince before and not had any problem using the fruit but there's just so much of it. I've read they ripen off the tree as well?

Oct 10, 2011
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

What Are Your Irrefutable Food Rules? [moved from Not About Food]

"1. Never order rice as a side at a non-Asian food restaurant."

Sorry for the confusion - to clarify, I meant plain rice. Risotto and pilafs are of course delish!

how to solve a problem like a quince

Or more specifically - how long will a split quince last once picked? Will it last in the fridge/cold storage? Can I cut and freeze it?

I found a couple on the ground yesterday and figured that meant they were ripe so I picked the tree. I was planning to cut away the exposed spots and work with the rest of the fruit but the tree yielded a lot of fruit this year (about 100 quince; 70 split) so I don't think I can deal with them all in a day. I regularly have a pretty busy work week (I have other commitments nearly every evening after work hours) which means I most likely won't get to them again until next weekend.

This is only the second time I've been able to harvest quince from the tree. I made jelly and membrillo a couple of years ago and they were so wonderful. I definitely want to make more of those as well as experiment with them since there was so much fruit this year.

Thanks in advance for your advice! :)

Oct 10, 2011
jubilant cerise in Home Cooking

What Are Your Irrefutable Food Rules? [moved from Not About Food]

CanadaGirl: I have yet to eat at at Turkish restaurant. Guess it's time to save up for a plane ticket... ;)

What Are Your Irrefutable Food Rules? [moved from Not About Food]

pj26 that Turkish rice does sound good - of course butter makes everything better. :) It's mostly plain rice at restaurants that have been treacherous mistakes for me (or pilaf made with instant or parboiled rice). Even at restaurants I eat at regularly! - I take a chance since I like everything else and then - disappointment.

What is your "go to" meal when there is too much month left at the end of the paycheque - past or present

Past and present eats:

- pb & j sandwiches and a banana-yogurt smoothie for breakfast is my current go-to.
- cereal (any time of day)
- French toast (made this so often as a kid that my sister hated it for years afterwards - but when there's nothing but bread, eggs and milk in the fridge growing up...)
- lugaw (filipino porridge of chicken and rice)
- pasta with Marcella Hazan's tomato sauce. So tasty but the amount of butter still freaks me out a little. (http://steamykitchen.com/8375-marcell...)
- pasta scrambled in eggs
- rice with a diced hard-boiled egg and tomato (the filipino dish I grew up with used salted eggs; this is obviously healthier without all that salt)
- greek salad with garbanzo beans (or just about any beans, for the protein)
- a store-bought cold roast chicken can last weeks with a bit of planning. (Yes, store-bought. I just don't have the luxury of time to roast a chicken at home. God, I love the smell.)
- french onion soup (the cheese is pricey but if you have homemade stock, a couple onions and bread, you're set!)
- soft polenta cooked with milk (or cream) and finished with parmesan. Buttered toast on the side. Lovely with roasted tomato or ham/bacon on the side too. Ate this for weekend breakfasts a lot awhile back ago.

What Are Your Irrefutable Food Rules? [moved from Not About Food]

1. Never order rice as a side at a non-Asian food restaurant. (Pretty much the same as CanadaGirl's rule, just more specific.) It's either horrible parboiled rice or a disgusting pilaf (made with parboiled rice, to boot). Mind you, I've had bad plain rice at Asian restaurants as well (too wet, too dry, obviously yesterday's batch) but it's happened to me more often at the former. Rice is really easy to cook, so there's just no excuse for bad plain rice.

2. When eating out, only order what I have room for. (I don't drive, so if I have plans afterwards it's awkward to walk around with leftovers.)

3. Also when eating out, I always order something different than what my partner is eating unless it's something like pizza or chinese where it's meant to be shared.

4. Never drink wine made from kits or u-brew businesses.

What Are Your Irrefutable Food Rules? [moved from Not About Food]

+1000! ;)

Sadly, my partner grew up eating soy sauce on rice and there's nothing I can do to persuade him otherwise. So wrong, so very , very wrong...

Bumbershoot Festival weekend (Sept 3-5) - recs for eats?

Thanks again everyone for your posts! I was well-fed during this year's Bumbershoot and have plenty more places to check out next year because of all of your recs. Here's my notes on the places I went to:

Groceries: QFC was in the same building as Genki, so we went there. Had fun with the self-checkout system which I've never used before (these might be in larger Canadian cities but not in my smallish city as far as I know). Saw the Met Market while looking for Toulouse Petit and Pesos but since we had already shopped and were running short on time, we didn't get to check it out but it's on the list for next year.

Genki: had some really good items and others were ho-hum. For cheap eats it was a good choice and was very filling - I think we ate less than $20 of sushi between us. We also got two kinds of sake which I think was the other half of the bill. I really liked dessert: apple sake (served cold and sweet tasting) and moshi ice cream (green tea and taro).

Citizen: I had the Citizen crepe (spinach, caramelized onion, asparagus, avocado, bacon, goat cheese) for brekkie and it was super delish. My partner got the roast beef sandwich special. The next day we went with friends who also came across the border for Bumbershoot. I got Citizen sandwich for lunch (which was really brunch - spent too much time trying to check out Toulouse Petit and Pesos as lunch options) with a side salad and it kept me full all day! My partner got the huevos rancheros - both days he missed out on cowboy egg casserole which he was dying to try. But he enjoyed the huevos. Definitely on the list for next year.

Palace Kitchen: Saw this place last year but somehow missed it even though they're open until 1am. Got the goat cheese and lavender fondue appy and the tagliatelle with lamb as the main; my partner got the burger. Sooooo good. No room for the beautiful desserts. There's always next year though.

Bambino's: I wanted to get the Tre Gusti potato pizza (because I've never had potato on pizza) but my partner wanted to share, so I ended up getting the Capricciosa (italian sausage, mushroom and onion, tomato sauce, mozzarella) and he got the Bendetto calzoni (spicy peppers, calabrese, tomato sauce and mozza cheese) - then he didn't want to share! But I loved my pizza choice anyways. I wasn't sure I was going to be able to finish it - this was the same day as my Citizen sandwich but it turned out the heat of the day was suppressing my hunger and I polished off my pizza no problem. Drinks: I got the Cidre Bouche Brut de Normandi which is an unpasteurized apple cider - very nice. My partner got the Dogfish Head Sah'tea which reminded me of wheat beer.

Chutney's Grill (Bumbershoot food vendor): we shared a plate of butter chicken on rice, along with a beef kabob and mango lemonade. Delicious but a tad expensive at $14 though most all the Bumbershoot vendors were priced around the same for their eats.

In retrospect I'm not sure how healthy some any of my meals were but I enjoyed all of them. Thanks, Seattle Chowhounds!

-----
Palace Kitchen
2030 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

Should there always be food available when having people over?

Wow - definitely a lot of ideas and POV here, thanks everyone! I'm also from a family that always has food available at just about any gathering but some of you mentioned, I'm already sharing my home with people for rehearsal, and even though we're all friends this isn't a casual social gathering - we actually have a purpose! - so thank you for pointing that out.

Based on our first rehearsal, I think this group will probably be ok with beverages but I'll ask just to make sure no one is starving because I definitely don't want that. Then if people want to contribute food or money towards our snacks, we can do that.

Should there always be food available when having people over?

Once a week, people will be at my house for choir rehearsal in the evening. Everyone knows they're to have dinner before coming over but should I still put out some snacks? My only concern is that I don't have a lot of money to feed people. I don't mind putting out something to drink, like tea and water. Maybe if people wanted to chip in a dollar or two, I can offer to shop for snacks?