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Buying 50-100 lbs of boiled crawfish

I am having a party in City Park in April in one of their shelters. You're not allowed to boil crawfish there, so I'm going to buy it already boiled, probably 50-100 lbs. I do know about a bunch of local places: Kjean's, Dennis's in Metairie, Deannie's, etc, but I've never bought this much boiled crawfish at once. So, if anyone has a particular recommendation for a place to buy a large amount of boiled crawfish, in terms of both price and quality, I'd love to hear it. Thanks in advance!

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Kjean
New Orleans LA, New Orleans, LA

Mar 18, 2011
puma in New Orleans

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan - recommendations?

I wanted to let you know that I did in fact go out of my way to go to Firefly Grill in Effingham on that road trip, per your suggestion, and LOVED IT. Thank you so much for your recommendation! It was a really great experience!

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Firefly Grill
1810 Avenue of Mid America, Effingham, IL 62401

Nov 10, 2009
puma in General Midwest Archive

Dinner and brunch in Ocean Springs, MS?

I live in New Orleans and I'm taking an overnight trip to Ocean Springs, MS this coming weekend to visit the Walter Anderson Museum.

Anyone have any recommendations for dinner Saturday evening and brunch on Sunday? I would be interested in anything from fine dining to BBQ (and have seen rave reviews of the Shed BBQ here on Chowhound), and everything in between.

Also, I was intrigued by a fine-dining restaurant I saw listed called Fant's but have not seen a single review of it. Anyone know anything about that restaurant?

Any recommendations are most welcome!
Thanks in advance!

Nov 10, 2009
puma in Central South

Update: Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan

I am also cross-posting this to the Midwest board. Thanks to all of you who gave me SUCH great advice about my trip. This is my plan so far:

Leave New Orleans and drive to St. Louis, either through the Arkansas and Missouri Ozarks, where I've never been, or possibly following the Mississippi River or taking the Natchez Trace part of the way. I like meandering drives.

I will eat at one of the places suggested by "wekick" on the Midwest board here for St. Louis. From St. Louis I will drive east to Effingham, IL because wekick's suggestion of the Firefly Grill looks too good to pass up. [I will not go to Chicago on this trip since I've been there many times already.]

On my way home in mid-August I may stop in Knoxville, TN for a concert (long story) so I may go through KY, go to some more Bourbon distilleries, may also check out parts of TN I have not seen. If I decide not to go to Knoxville I will possibly check out some parts of KY bluegrass country I've never been to. Any other suggestions in KY bluegrass country or Knoxville (please see this same post on the Midwest board for any Midwestern suggestions) are welcome.

Thanks for the recommendations for eating in Ludington, MI -- actually I am going on an annual camping trip in a tent in the middle of nowhere near Ludington, but sometimes we do go to Ludington for food so I will remember those recs too. If any of you have never been to Butts and Bones BarbQ in Ludington I recommend it, by the way.

I will report back after mid-August upon my return.
Thanks!

Jul 22, 2009
puma in General South Archive

Update: road trip from New Orleans to Michigan

I am also cross-posting this to the South board. Thanks to all of you who gave me SUCH great advice about my trip. This is my plan so far:

Leave New Orleans and drive to St. Louis, either through the Arkansas and Missouri Ozarks, where I've never been, or possibly following the Mississippi River or taking the Natchez Trace part of the way. I like meandering drives.

I will eat at one of the places suggested by "wekick" here for St. Louis. From St. Louis I will drive east to Effingham, IL because wekick's suggestion of the Firefly Grill looks too good to pass up. [I will not go to Chicago on this trip since I've been there many times already.]

On my way home in mid-August I may stop in Knoxville, TN for a concert (long story) so I may go through KY, go to some more Bourbon distilleries, may also check out parts of TN I have not seen. If I decide not to go to Knoxville I will possibly check out some parts of KY bluegrass country I've never been to. Any other suggestions in KY bluegrass country or Knoxville (please see this same post on the South board for any Southern suggestions) are welcome.

Thanks for the recommendations for eating in Ludington, MI -- actually I am going on an annual camping trip in a tent in the middle of nowhere near Ludington, but sometimes we do go to Ludington for food so I will remember those recs too. If any of you have never been to Butts and Bones BarbQ in Ludington I recommend it, by the way.

I will report back after mid-August upon my return.
Thanks!

Jul 22, 2009
puma in General Midwest Archive

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan - recommendations?

Thanks! I may indeed do this. Good idea, the wineries.

Jul 22, 2009
puma in General Midwest Archive

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan - recommendations?

Yes I did not mention that I have actually done a lot of the bourbon distilleries. My favorite was Four Roses which is not well known outside of Kentucky. But doing more bourbon places is an idea.

Jul 22, 2009
puma in General Midwest Archive

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan -- recommendation?

Yeah, I've been to Lambert's actually. I don't feel a huge need to go back but I'm glad I went once. The food is large indeed and they do throw rolls at you. The food is just OK but not fabulous. Worth going to once.

Jul 22, 2009
puma in General South Archive

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan - recommendations?

Hi all

I posted this on the "southern" board as well. I live in New Orleans and I am driving from here to Michigan (Ludington, near the lake, if you need to know where in MI). I am leaving next week, I have only one or two overnights to spare for the drive up. However I love road trips and I love going all over, on little roads, to little towns, the world is my oyster. So I have not decided on a route yet. The most direct way is straight up through KY and Indiana, but I was even thinking of going through St. Louis cuz I love that town. So what I'm trying to say is that I am open about my route, so long as it doesn't take me too far out of my way, but 2-3 hours out of my way is OK for something real fun.

So here is the question: Do you have recommendations for neat places to stop overnight on my way? I love little roads, little towns, big cities, off the beaten path, on the beaten path, ALL sorts of food (low brow to high brow). I also love old hotels. So if any of you have a fun suggestion, really anywhere from Arkansas/Missouri or up through Kentucky/Indiana, I'm interested. Give me your ideas! I'm interested in fun places to eat (road stop, family restaurant, old school southern food, fancy cuisine, anything), interesting towns, and hotels with history. Other than that, the sky is the limit.

Obviously I also have to drive back home, so I can even go one way up there, and another route on the way back.

Some criteria:
- I am a woman traveling alone, and I am not traditional looking (I have tattoos) so I need to stay places where I will feel safe, whether safe in terms of my own safety or safe in terms of not being given a hard time because I have short hair and tattoos.
- I have spent a lot of time in Memphis, Nashville, Louisville KY, and Paducah KY so I'm not interested in any of those places.
- Money isn't a huge issue but I'd rather spend less than $75 on dinner for myself and less than $200 for a hotel room. $225-ish would be OK if it's a really special hotel (ex: I once stayed in the Hotel Phillips in Kansas City on a road trip and it was $225 a night at that point and I had such a great night and the best steak I ever ate from their room service, so it was worth the splurge). Low brow is OK too as long as I'm safe being alone.

Looking forward to your suggestions!

Jul 16, 2009
puma in General Midwest Archive

Road trip from New Orleans to Michigan -- recommendation?

Hi all

I'm going to post this on the midwest board as well. I live in New Orleans and I am driving from here to Michigan (Ludington, near the lake, if you need to know where in MI). I am leaving next week, I have only one or two overnights to spare for the drive up. However I love road trips and I love going all over, on little roads, to little towns, the world is my oyster. So I have not decided on a route yet. The most direct way is straight up through KY and Indiana, but I was even thinking of going through St. Louis cuz I love that town. So what I'm trying to say is that I am open about my route, so long as it doesn't take me too far out of my way, but 2-3 hours out of my way is OK for something real fun.

So here is the question: Do you have recommendations for neat places to stop overnight on my way? I love little roads, little towns, big cities, off the beaten path, on the beaten path, ALL sorts of food (low brow to high brow). I also love old hotels. So if any of you have a fun suggestion, really anywhere from Arkansas/Missouri or up through Kentucky/Indiana, I'm interested. Give me your ideas! I'm interested in fun places to eat (road stop, family restaurant, old school southern food, fancy cuisine, anything), interesting towns, and hotels with history. Other than that, the sky is the limit.

Obviously I also have to drive back home, so I can even go one way up there, and another route on the way back.

Some criteria:
- I am a woman traveling alone, and I am not traditional looking (I have tattoos) so I need to stay places where I will feel safe, whether safe in terms of my own safety or safe in terms of not being given a hard time because I have short hair and tattoos.
- I have spent a lot of time in Memphis, Nashville, Louisville KY, and Paducah KY so I'm not interested in any of those places.
- Money isn't a huge issue but I'd rather spend less than $75 on dinner for myself and less than $200 for a hotel room. $225-ish would be OK if it's a really special hotel (ex: I once stayed in the Hotel Phillips in Kansas City on a road trip and it was $225 a night at that point and I had such a great night and the best steak I ever ate from their room service, so it was worth the splurge). Low brow is OK too as long as I'm safe being alone.

Looking forward to your suggestions!

Jul 16, 2009
puma in General South Archive

Report from Sazerac Bar in the Roosevelt

The place I've had most of my Sazeracs is Mandina's (where I am addicted to the daube) and they use Sazerac Rye. That's why I was under the impression it was more common than people here have indicated. I feel well schooled in the history of types of rye used in Sazeracs here, now. My born-and-raised girlfriend, whom I moved here to be with, is not a whiskey or rye drinker so did not educate me properly in this matter.

FYI I wrote an email to the Sazerac company asking them when their rye first appeared on shelves and exactly what their relationship is to the Buffalo Trace bourbon company, where Sazerac seems to actually be distilled. Will report back.

Jul 15, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Report from Sazerac Bar in the Roosevelt

I will qualify this next comment by saying that I moved here because I fell in love with a many-generations-local, all of my friends have been born and raised here for generations, i teach at a local college where almost everyone has been born and raised, so I spend all my time around longtime locals. With that said, if there is one thing I have learned here it's that my natural first inclination in life is to be excited and pleased. But in New Orleans it appears that I am in the minority because I don't complain about every restaurant I eat at. I tease my girlfriend and friends about this all the time. Most people, I think, assume that if I don't complain I must be pedestrian in my tastes. But I think I've figured out that people here actually enjoy complaining about restaurants, it's part of the process of eating out here. I say that with love because I love this town the food, and the people. It's just full of the pickiest eaters I've ever seen, and I grew up someplace I thought people were picky: NYC!

Thanks for the piece of info that it is acceptable to make a Sazerac with something other than Sazerac rye. I guess the Peychaud's is really the thing you can't do without? At least that is according to my friend whose family tomb is in St. Louis #1 and makes a mean Sazerac herself.

Jul 14, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Report from Sazerac Bar in the Roosevelt

I searched for posts about the Roosevelt in the past two weeks and noticed a few people had asked if anyone had been there yet.

Yesterday I went for an afternoon cocktail at the Sazerac Bar with a visiting friend. I knew the Roosevelt had opened back up but had not yet been. I was extremely impressed by the way the hotel looks. It's gorgeous. It's obviously not all the way open yet, they are still working on one of the storefront sites -- I think it's the space where Besh's Domenica will open up in a couple of months. But the inside of the lobby is lovely; I think they did a nice job there.

The Sazerac Bar itself is also gorgeous. I never went there before the storm, so I can't compare it to its former glory, but to me it's a gorgeous space. Tile floor, wall paintings, beautiful Art Deco etched glass above the bar, the wooden bar itself, all look wonderful to me. I overheard someone ask the bartender if the bar itself was the original and had been in good condition and the bartender said yes, so it appears perhaps the bones of the place were in decent shape.

The drinks. I've had Sazeracs all over this town, my favorite is usually at Mandina's. This was a lovely Sazerac and of course I saw the bottles of Peychaud's and Sazerac Rye so I know they are, of course, using all the right ingredients (can't imagine that they wouldn't or they'd be lined up and stoned to death in this town). It was on the sweeter side of the Sazeracs I've had here, which I like. Not too much ice (I like it on the rocks), and a nice lemon twist. My friend, who does not like whiskey or rye, had two different drinks from the drink menu, both of which were very good, one Rum based (called a Dark and Stormy, I believe) and the other was touted in the menu as being Huey Long's favorite drink and was also very tasty. The drink menu is nice and simple and consists of about eight special cocktails listed and the second page was, I think, wines by the glass. This particular bartender seemed pretty knowledgeable and the bar seemed stocked with good quality liquor. I get the impression they are still putting finishing touches on the decor (and the bartender indicated as much) but it really looks nice. I asked the bartender how crowded it's been on weekends and he said, quite crowded. We were there on, well, a Monday afternoon at 2 p.m. and so of course it wasn't crowded but we were not the only people there. There are a few nice tables plus the very lovely long wooden bar with comfortable stools. A good place for a drink or four.

There is also the very nice looking Sazerac Restaurant next door to the bar. We looked at the menu which is small but well chosen. The things I remember best were a Foie Gras appetizer and a lamb entree. Not inexpensive. I will try it at my next opportunity.

I would be interested to hear if anyone else has gone, has eaten at the restaurant, or has gone to the bar when it was more crowded and how that was, too.

I am very happy the hotel, bar, and restaurant are open. It feels like a god thing for the city, for us locals, and certainly for tourists. I am sure you'll see me there sipping a Sazerac one of these Friday early evenings.

Jul 14, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Camellia Grill

While I stand by everything I said above, I do think Camellia has probably changed a lot in the past few years. I think the menu has changed, certainly it's run by different people, my impression is that all the old waiters are no longer there. So if you used to go there a lot and have not gone in years, I do think a lot of people will be disappointed.

I still think it's a great version of a diner.

Jul 14, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Headcheese

If you go to the new Cochon butcher (next door to Cochon restaurant in the warehouse district), I know he makes really good hog's head cheese. If you live uptown, I did buy that same head cheese once at that fancy cheese store, St. James Cheese, on Prytania a block or so uptown from the Creole Creamery.

I hate to say this but the best head cheese, spicy, I ever had was some my coworker gave me and I am embarrassed to say I think she told me she got it either at Walmart or Sam's club. Sad but true. It was real spicy and good.

Jul 14, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Camellia Grill

I have to strongly disagree with what many people here say. I live here and I go to Camellia Grill often. I'm not sure what everyone is expecting -- Camellia is not Ruth's Chris steakhouse, it's not Emeril's, it's a greasy spoon diner. No more, no less. It's one of my favorite places for burgers because I don't like the gigantic overstuffed burgers most people like; Camellia burgers are a manageable size, are simple and just good. I always get a cheesburger dressed. I have NEVER, ever had any food there I would even remotely describe as bland. I love the fact that they don't salt your fries and they let me put as much or as little salt on them as I want. And... you expected handmade fries at a diner?

Camellia has most certainly not "gone corporate," it's just a burger joint, it's not even a chain.

My usual is a cheeseburger and fries and a chocolate cherry freeze. I also love the Camellia Club sandwich and the other night I took a friend from out of town there and I asked for a tuna melt for the first time, it was great.

I am originally from NYC and I grew up going to lots of NY diners, and Camellia Grill is, in my opinion, an excellent southern version of a diner. This is not high brow food and if you want that, you should absolutely not go there.

My favorite waiter there is Michael, by the way. He is a lovely man and not over-the-top in the way some of the waiters there are. He works Saturday nights for sure, I'm not sure what other nights.

If you go to Camellia expecting low brow diner food you will be happy. If you are expecting something else, you shouldn't even go there at all.

Jul 14, 2009
puma in New Orleans

What to do with a lot of old, bad wine?

Thanks, that is the most sensible answer I could possibly expect.

Jul 13, 2009
puma in Wine

What to do with a lot of old, bad wine?

This may not be the right place to ask this, however, I will give it a shot. I am a lover of good wine, have a wine fridge, etc. Someone I know who does not drink and knows nothing about wine brought about 20 bottles to my house recently. They are all bottles that were bad when they were bottled, and are probably even worse now. Many are as old as the 1980s, many are whites that should never have been "cellared," all bad wine. To top it off, I live in New Orleans and there is almost a 100% chance these bottles were improperly stored and probably stayed in a flooded house after Katrina, in 90 degree weather for weeks. To sum it up, I now have 20 bottles of terrible, skunked wine.

What can I do with them? I looked up instructions on how to make my own wine vinegar. I will probably do this, but there is only so much of my homemade wine vinegar the world needs. I tried to get rid of most of it on freecycle but they don't allow me to post offerings of alcohol. I feel bad just pouring it all down the sink, despite how terrible this wine is.

Should I just trash all these bottles and not worry about this totally worthless wine? Or is there some use I can put them to, something I have not thought of yet?

Thanks for answering this very odd question.

Jul 13, 2009
puma in Wine

Two nights in Dallas

I won't be there on a Fri or Sat -- but I read about Potager and it sounds really great, so I may try to go for lunch. Thanks!

Jul 01, 2009
puma in Dallas - Fort Worth

Two nights in Dallas

Hello!

I live in New Orleans and I will be driving to Dallas soon to stay for two nights. We are staying downtown right near Union Station. Digression: I'm actually driving there just to go to the Korean day spa -- King Sauna. I'm from NYC originally and I really miss the Korean bath houses in the NYC area. I looked and looked and found a branch of my favorite one from NYC, right in Dallas, 8 hours drive away from me! Exciting. If you have never been and you like steam rooms, hot tubs, saunas, and also real Korean food, I HIGHLY recommend you Dallas folks go there. http://www.dallaskingsauna.com It's definitely different from anything else found in the U.S.

So anyhow I am looking for places to eat in Dallas. Any recommendations? It would be good to find someplace reasonable -- like close to or less than $100 for two people including a glass of wine each and maybe dessert, if this is possible.

For the more upscale, I like places that serve local, fresh ingredients or specialize in that type of cuisine, although I just like food, so anything is possible.

However, I am also very open to locally known places, doesn't need to be fancy or upscale at all, could be a hole in the wall or a BBQ place. I eat anything and everything and I like to explore new cities and their cuisine, from the high to the low scale.

I've never ever been to Dallas so I'm really open. My only limit is that since I'm spending $ to dirve to a new city to stay in a hotel just to get a sauna and a body scrub... well, I don't want to spend a ton of money eating out.

Dallas folks, give me your best ideas.

Thanks!

Jul 01, 2009
puma in Dallas - Fort Worth

St. Patrick's in N.O.

Definitely go to the Irish Channel St. Patrick's Day parade (it's listed in the second link in the first reply), if you'll be here then. New Orleans food tradition for St. Patrick's day is that you go to a parade and they throw the makings of corned beef and cabbage from the parade (well, except for the corned beef). Where else can you get a cabbage thrown at you on a holiday? Then you go home and cook corned beef and cabbage from the stuff you caught at the parade (at least that's what I do). The bar Parasol's is where everyone goes on St. Patrick's Day itself, but I don't know what will be going on there the weekend before St. Pat's day.

Jan 29, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Restaurant August report

I went to August with a visiting friend. I thought it was as good as other comparable high-end restaurants I've been to. I did find the desserts to be mediocre, however.

Jan 29, 2009
puma in New Orleans

Cheese "puffs?"

These all look pretty great. I appreciate it. Will try some of these out and let you know.
Thanks!

Jan 25, 2009
puma in Home Cooking

Cheese "puffs?"

Oh, I appreciate it. Thanks! In doing a little research, we think it might not be cheddar based, might be some other kind of cheese. I think there are chives in it. It's probably a very simple recipe but remains a bit of a mystery at the moment. Thanks again for your sleuthing.

Jan 25, 2009
puma in Home Cooking

Cheese "puffs?"

I live in New Orleans. A friend of mine who is from a family that has been in Louisiana for many generations makes an amazing hors d'oeuvre. It is not by any means highbrow cooking: I imagine that, like many other regional family recipes I've had here in New Orleans ("Mock Oyster Dip" being a good example) it is probably made with store-bought processed foods like Bunny Bread or Velveeta. But these things are so good, every time my friend brings them to a party, we cannot stop eating them. And, of course, it's her family's recipe and she won't give it to me! I have looked in all my old-school Louisiana cookbooks with no results. I thought maybe someone out there in New Orleans Chow-Land might have a family recipe they would share. I call them "cheese puffs" because I don't know what else to call them. They are made by making a yummy spread out of cheddar cheese (or maybe some processed cheddar cheese imitation) plus a bunch of spices (it has a little bit of a kick to it), spreading this on small rounds that you cut out of white bread (my friend's are about the size of a quarter), and then baking the cheese-spread-rounds in the oven until they are crisp. If anyone has any idea what I am talking about and has a recipe, you would be very popular in my household. If no one here can help, I am going to write to Marcelle Bienvenue and Judy Walker in the Times-Pic. Thanks a lot!

Jan 24, 2009
puma in Home Cooking

New Orleans cheese "puff" appetizer recipe?

I live in New Orleans. A friend of mine who is from a family that has been in Louisiana for many generations makes an amazing hors d'oeuvre. It is not by any means highbrow cooking: I imagine that, like many other regional family recipes I've had here in New Orleans ("Mock Oyster Dip" being a good example) it is probably made with store-bought processed foods like Bunny Bread or Velveeta. But these things are so good, every time my friend brings them to a party, we cannot stop eating them. And, of course, it's her family's recipe and she won't give it to me! I have looked in all my old-school Louisiana cookbooks with no results. I thought maybe someone out there in Chow-Land might have a family recipe they would share. I call them "cheese puffs" because I don't know what else to call them. They are made by making a yummy spread out of cheddar cheese (or maybe some processed cheddar cheese imitation) plus a bunch of spices (it has a little bit of a kick to it), spreading this on small rounds that you cut out of white bread (my friend's are about the size of a quarter), and then baking the cheese-spread-rounds in the oven until they are crisp. If anyone has any idea what I am talking about and has a recipe, you would be very popular in my household. If no one here can help, I am going to write to Marcelle Bienvenue and Judy Walker in the Times-Pic. Thanks a lot!

Jan 19, 2009
puma in Home Cooking

High English Tea in New Orleans?

Well, seeing as I'm from the Bronx, I think I forgive myself for not knowing.

Afternoon tea it is. Although I am in no way the Queen.

Jun 23, 2008
puma in New Orleans

looking for great soul food near french quarter

I just want to give a rousing second nomination for the Praline Connection. A short walk across Esplanade from the French Quarter, in a great neighborhood with lots of great stuff to do (The Marigny). The Praline Connection does not disappoint. Try the collard greens for sure.

Jun 16, 2008
puma in New Orleans

High English Tea in New Orleans?

I am going to make reservations immediately at the Victoria Inn. I'd drive an hour any day for good high tea. Thanks for the rec.

Jun 16, 2008
puma in New Orleans

High English Tea in New Orleans?

Thanks so much!

Jun 16, 2008
puma in New Orleans