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Meorav Yerushalmi in Jerusalem

Fortuna on HaArmonim St in Mahane Yehuda, across the street from HaShipudia.

Aug 20, 2015
bcc in Middle East & Africa

Sid’ Prospective List For Rome

Do look into Le Tre Zucche, a place I learned about from Elizabeth Minchilli's blog. I enjoyed it much more than Cesare al Casaletto.

Feb 12, 2015
bcc in Italy
1

italian meatballs

Glad it worked out. I wish all my ideas were that good.

Feb 02, 2015
bcc in Home Cooking

italian meatballs

With my blessing!

Feb 01, 2015
bcc in Home Cooking

Foraging in the 5th?

There is a very good wine store called Le Vin qui Parle on Boulevard Saint-Germain, just a few steps away from the Maubert-Mutualité Metro station. They have some interesting wines that are not too expensive.

Feb 01, 2015
bcc in France

italian meatballs

smilingal, I forgot to mention that I put the cooked rice through the meat grinder after the meat is done. The rice not only gets the last of the meat out, but when it's ground, it gives the meatballs a very nice, creamy consistency.

Jan 28, 2015
bcc in Home Cooking

italian meatballs

Bread is good, but I use cooked brown rice, which gives a really great, creamy result. About 1/2 cup of rice (measured before cooking) per kilo of meat.

Jan 28, 2015
bcc in Home Cooking

Carlsberg plans cardboard beer bottles

Why not? Completely suitable for cardboard beer.

Jan 27, 2015
bcc in Beer

Wan Chai Seafood in Flushing - Excellent

Thanks, Pookipichu. Love your reports. I'm looking forward to trying it on our next visit to New York.

Jan 16, 2015
bcc in Outer Boroughs

Food Processor wattage?

Wattage alone doesn't tell you anything about performance. It's like saying that one motor uses 4 gallons of gas and another uses 6 gallons of gas. In neither case do you know how efficiently the motor uses the gas. You don't know how quickly either one can go from 0 to 60 mph.

Jan 16, 2015
bcc in Cookware

Difference between Japanese chef cooking in Paris and Japanese chef cooking Asian inspired French food in Paris

Don't overlook Clandé, formerly known as Clandestino.

Jan 12, 2015
bcc in France

Stuck in the Tel Aviv suburbs

I just saw your post. So if you haven't traveled yet, or still are there, you might want to look into Oved's sabich, a sandwich of fried eggplant, hard-boiled egg, and salads in a pita with amba. Oved's in Givatayim is supposed to be the best in the country.

Jan 10, 2015
bcc in Middle East & Africa

Tel Aviv Help

One nice place that is small and not noisy is called Tchernikhovski 6 (03-620 8729), although the street address is Tschernikhovski 5. Oasis used to be right next door. Another place we really like is Hachalutzim 3 (03-523 1016), which is both the name of the restaurant and its address. Both of these are quite small, so reservations are essential.
Bertie is good, but loud. Bertie has an indoor area, which is too loud for me, and an enclosed porch. I find the noise in the porch bearable.
We discovered a very interesting place this year called Hanan Margilan, a Bucharian restaurant way outside the center of things (Mesilat Yesharim 15, 03-687 3984). It's interesting because it's different from most everything else, and it's kosher, which is quite useful if you are going out to eat with religious friends.
I'd be interested to hear what your experiences were. Have fun! And if you like ancient glass, don't miss the glass pavilion at the Eretz Israel Museum.

Jan 08, 2015
bcc in Middle East & Africa

Tel Aviv Help

Hi Daisy,

We ate at Shila a couple of years ago and found it almost unbearably loud, although the food was excellent. We ate at Oasis two weeks ago, and I thought it was a bit too loud. Another thing about Oasis is that it doesn't seem to have recovered completely from its recent change of location. Formerly Oasis had 5 tables; now it has some 25. We've never been to Messa. Herbert Samuel is a bit pretentious, and not overly good. Its chef, Yonatan Roshfeld, seems to be more interested in business than cooking these days. Abu Hassan is great.
Another place you may wish to consider is Habasta on Hashomer St, our favorite place in Tel Aviv. Another good place is Mul Yam, although if you go there, I recommend going at lunchtime so that you can get the luncheon menu. Otherwise Mul Yam is extremely expensive.

Jan 08, 2015
bcc in Middle East & Africa

Does a bialy always have onions?

Kossar's on the Lower East Side offers bialys with onions in the middle, or garlic. Or at least they did the last time I was there.

Jan 04, 2015
bcc in General Topics

Craving Fried Clams like the old Howard Johnson's

Wish I could help, but I can't. But I was born in Quincy, MA, where the original Howard Johnson's got its start.

Dec 14, 2014
bcc in Washington DC & Baltimore

Bamix Immersion blender

I have an old Bamix, some 30 years old. It originally came with a little container for chopping stuff in. I never used it, and have no idea where it is today. I have two or three blades for it. The only one I use is the basic one. All the rest is fluff.

Nov 29, 2014
bcc in Cookware

Authentic Mexican restaurant recommendations?

Tenoch in Medford is good, but Angela's Cafe in East Boston is great.

Nov 23, 2014
bcc in Greater Boston Area

Need a rec for dinner in Tel Aviv

I haven't eaten at Mizlala or Fitzroy, but Bertie is quite good, albeit noisy. Try to sit on the outside enclosed porch, where it's quieter. Whether or not it's "moderately priced" depends on how you look at it. To my mind it's fairly expensive.

Nov 23, 2014
bcc in Middle East & Africa

Second try with octopus

I have always had good results with these two recipes
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/16/din...
and
http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/10...
I know that octopus can also be grilled, but I haven't tried that yet.

Nov 01, 2014
bcc in Home Cooking

Why drink chicken soup when you are sick? What so special?

You mean to say, you don't believe in magic?!

Oct 30, 2014
bcc in General Topics

A report: 10 days in Paris

We visit Paris every year and we visit Italy quite often. I find that people treat visitors with a great deal of warmth in both places, although they express it differently. The Italians are more effusive perhaps. The Parisians may not greet you with "Ciao, Bella!", but when a shopkeeper goes out on the street with you to give you directions to the bus stop--from a shop, mind you, where you have not bought anything--I count that as warmth.

What appliance or gadget for making ginger-garlic paste? Maybe also for grinding whole spices?

I would recommend a large wooden pestle, like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Poundin... or maybe this: http://www.amazon.com/JOKARI-240057-J...
You can use it in any bowl, because you press gently in a stirring motion instead of pounding everything. That way things don't go flying. For garlic or ginger, add a pinch or two of salt. You'll get a great paste in a couple of minutes. For whole spices, roast them first in a dry frying pan and let them cool off before grinding them. That way they are easier to grind and the flavor is improved.

Oct 30, 2014
bcc in Cookware

Where are the best Chinese restaurants in New York?

Hi Pookipichu,

We visited the New World Mall with a Chinese cousin on early October. We really loved some of the dishes we had (lamb stew), thought others were so-so, and tossed another practically uneaten in the garbage. I don't remember what it was. In any case, we only tried dishes from 2 or 3 of the stalls, so a return visit is definitely in order.
My wife and I didn't get to visit most of the places you recommended, since we were with other friends/relatives, who, for some strange reason, did not want all of their meals to be Chinese??!! But we did go to Hakkasan, just the two of us, for Sunday brunch. The food was exquisite: the pipa duck, the various dim sum. This was definitely some of the best Chinese food we have ever eaten. However, the noise level was so high that it made it impossible for me to enjoy the experience. I had bought some foam rubber ear plugs, so I tried them at Hakkasan for the first time. They did reduce the general noise level to an acceptable threshold. But while they were in my ears, the major sound sensation that I enjoyed was that of my own chewing. "Enjoy" may be the wrong word here.
Be that as it may, we were extremely pleased to have your recommendations, and will certainly consider them in future trips to New York.

Oct 25, 2014
bcc in Food Media & News

tel aviv restaurants-still need help :-)

Deb, What's the noise level like at Mizlala?

Oct 18, 2014
bcc in Middle East & Africa

tel aviv restaurants-still need help :-)

At present Oasis has about 4 tables and can seat maybe 12 diners, so reservations are essential. They are planning to move to bigger quarters, but I don't know when the move is scheduled to take place. And yes, it is quite casual.
When you walk up Geula St. and cross Allenby, you'll be right in front of Cafe Bialik. They have a nice selection of small meals and sandwiches. When I say "small", I am not referring to size; small in the sense of informal. Another very informal place in the area is Little Prague, not a gourmet destination, but good and cheap, and with great beer.

Oct 18, 2014
bcc in Middle East & Africa

MUST TRY RESTURANTS IN TEL AVIV

Oasis
Habasta
Bertie
Shila
Haminzar (for lunch, too noisy otherwise; open 24/7)
Thai House
Tschernikhovski 6
Mul Yam (maybe; this could be Tel Aviv's most expensive restaurant)

Oct 17, 2014
bcc in Middle East & Africa

tel aviv restaurants-still need help :-)

I haven't heard anything about Mizlala, but we may try it this year. We ate in Oasis last year, and I think it's terrific. I can't wait to go back.

Oct 17, 2014
bcc in Middle East & Africa

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

A starter develops a strong smell, but it should not be repulsive. If the smell turns your stomach, I think you should probably chuck it. I have been using Maggie Glezer's recipe, and my starter is going on its tenth year. The recipe has since been posted on the internet. If you are interested, here it is: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2390...

Oct 17, 2014
bcc in Home Cooking

newbie needs help from all you sourdough bakers!

I wouldn't worry about minor discrepancies in the measurements for your sourdough starter. The yeasts and bacteria will grow anyway. The yeasts and bacteria, the organisms that create sourdough, exist on the flour itself, they do not come from the air. They are, according to Maggie Glezer, particularly abundant on rye flour, so that is what she recommends for creating a new starter. It worked for me. You do not need any honey, grapes, commercial yeast, or anything else. Good luck!

Oct 15, 2014
bcc in Home Cooking