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joonjoon's Profile

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cast iron skillets

What are you, some kind of adult whose idea of maturity is asking someone if they're 12?

I'm 37 but my mental age is probably close to 12. Not sure what the comment I made has to do with my age though. I had never heard of a cornstick pan and I did think it sounded funny. Not sure why that deserved that kind of response from you, but then I'm 12 so I guess I have a lot to learn.

about 11 hours ago
joonjoon in Cookware

Do you use garlic powder?

Garlic oregano and crushed pepper are musts on my plain slice!

cast iron skillets

>my cornstick pans

Hmm.

Aug 25, 2015
joonjoon in Cookware

cast iron skillets

I love the *idea* of CI. I tried for years and years to really love mine but in the end I gave up. I use SS for almost everything and have a cheapo nonstick for when I need that and I can't think of a single time I've actually wished for cast iron.

Aug 25, 2015
joonjoon in Cookware

Can you taste MSG in the food you are eating?

I don't have the slightest clue as to what your point is.

Aug 24, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics
1

General Soup Question...

Aug 22, 2015
joonjoon in Home Cooking

Horrible Restaurant Names

I'm 37, for the record. :D

Aug 22, 2015
joonjoon in Not About Food

Caramelized Onions - would like more ways to eat them

Thanks cstout! I love your enthusiasm! :) I've actually never made my own bread of any kind. As much as I love to cook, flour scares me! But you've motivated me to give it a try. If you find any other great uses for caramelized onions please report back!

Aug 22, 2015
joonjoon in Home Cooking

Our perception of "authenticity"

I think it's time to open up some authentic North Korean restaurants in America...it'll be all the rage! "North Korean Bark Diet sweeps across America"

SPAM

God I really wish this myth would die already. Spam isn't made from scraps, it's made from pork shoulder and ham (as in fresh rear legs).

Aug 21, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

Nice research PhilD!

Apparently it is authentic. And spot on research. The particular show I was talking about was about "DMZ Cuisine" - it was an episode showcasing what the people who live along the northern border of South Korea eat, so this makes perfect sense.

So yes Go Su (cilantro) is authentic but still very obscure. I've never seen it mentioned anywhere until I saw this episode, and I think I mentioned somewhere that my mother had heard of it but didn't actually know what it was. I don't think I've ever met a Korean who had ever had cilantro in native Korean cooking either.

Aug 21, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

I should have clarified in the OP. I was specficially talking about Napa Cabbage (baechu) kimchi. It wasn't a different type of kimchi, but just regular kimchi with the addition of cilantro.

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

General Soup Question...

You can really add it at any time since you'll probably want the meat fully cooked. It's up to you to decide how long you want to let it go - the longer it simmers the more flavor you'll have in your soup and the less tasty your meat will be.

Pre-seared is fine if you want it brown but if you're slicing thin it might be hard to get a good sear before it's fully cooked. I personally don't think fond/searing works well in a miso soup which is supposed to be light and delicate.

If it were up to me I would slice it super thin and put it in right when you're serving it. Like the beef slices in Pho or how you would eat slices of meat with shabu shabu/hot pot. You might want the chicken well done but the pork can be a little under.

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in Home Cooking

Caramelized Onions - would like more ways to eat them

I make this "pizza" at parties and people go bananas over it. I've made it with pizza dough before but I usually use some store bought naan or flat bread type thing.

Take some *well* caramelized onions and spread it to make a base.
Throw on some blue and/or goat cheese
Sprinkle some bacon or prosciutto or your favorite cured pork product all over
Add some figs and/or dates
Little grind of pepper

Bake that shit until the cheese is melty and everything is toasty.

Top it with a bunch of fresh arugula.
Drizzle a little EVOO and/or truffle salt/oil/real truffle

Along similar lines try throwing it between bread with some gruyere and parm or something similar (and maybe some thyme or something) for some sweet french onion grilled cheese goodness. Go nuts and throw a slice of beef in there if you're feeling crazy.

Throw it on a burger with blue cheese and a tiny bit of mayo. Don't need nothin else. Ok maybe a little bacon.

When I make caramelized onions I'll do a few lbs at once and freeze it. That way it's always there when I need it. I like to make mine with some bay leaves and finish it with some sherry. Keep some water on the side so that you can scrape any brown bits without burning and get those babies really dark.

My favorite "secret" way of using them is to buzz it up into a puree and throw it into stews. It takes curries from meh to bangin'. I especially love throwing it in Japanese curry because it's so easy and really makes a huge difference in final flavor.

Why boil salsa ingredients?

>"Boil"? Like.... Literally adding the various ingredients to boiling water to cook? If so that is unusual.

Would you say it's...not authentic? ;)

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics
1

Horrible Restaurant Names

Funny Pho restaurant names are just too easy, it's like shooting fish in a barrel.

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in Not About Food

Horrible Restaurant Names

I want to start a fancy restaurant called "Uranus." Imagine the hilarity.

"Where should we go for dinner?"

"How about Uranus?"

"I love Uranus, but it's always packed there."

...and on and on

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in Not About Food
1

Our perception of "authenticity"

Yes exactly. Even if we were able to exactly define what authentic means, unless you know what all of those Chinese people are eating, you do not have the necessary knowledge to declare a dish authentic or not.

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

>An unspecified number of people that "generally accepts a version as to be representative of that culture."

That's my point. Unless you've studied every single village and every single family making their variation on a dish you simply cannot declare whether said variation is authentic or not, because few, if any people in the world can possibly have that level of knowledge.

Our perception of "authenticity"

>But if someone adds foie gras I'd say it is inauthentic.

And who gave you the authority to declare that?

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

Exactly. If we count Budae Chigae as authentic Korean food now, is this authentic Japanese food also? https://stephanietsai.files.wordpress...

Are Korean Tacos authentic American food?

I think a lot of people have largely ignored my main point from this post. I wasn't trying to say that authenticity is meaningless or anything like that. I was just saying - don't be an asshole about it! Don't act like you're some God-given authority on authenticity! If someone puts peas or cream in carbonara, don't be a dick! You can claim it's no longer authentic, but there may very well be some families over in Italy who make it that way. You probably don't know as much about "authenticity" as you think you do, and you never will unless you scour every village and every family in the world.

For some reason food nerd culture has invented these imaginary "verboten" changes to dishes that people for whatever reason shit themselves over. Don't be an authentinazi, let people evolve the dish and call it what they want.

Aug 20, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Help me with my Garlic overdose!!

Have you heard of chicken w/ 40 cloves? It's a chicken dish with tons and tons of garlic.

What you made sounds like it would be freaking delicious. I would keep it as is and enjoy. If it's too garlicky just cook it some more and it'll mellow out.

Otherwise use it as a base for other sauces!

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in Home Cooking
1

Our perception of "authenticity"

Please swipe and spread it! (heh heh) I think some people missed the point of my original post - I wasn't trying to say we should abandon the word "authentic" or that it's useless. I'm just saying hey guys, don't be a pedantic asshole because a dish isn't what *you* perceive to be authentic.

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics
1

Our perception of "authenticity"

"Chinese food" is such a huge, huge moving target that I feel like "authentic Chinese food" is a term only useful in defining what it *isn't*. Almost like "authentic earth food" wouldn't be useful for anyone other than aliens.

Let's try an experiment. Imagine someone told you that they had found an "authentic Chinese restaurant." Your job is to guess what specific kinds of food they serve there. Can you? It's impossible. Its only use is in knowing what they *won't* serve - chicken broccoli, chop suey, etc. With the staggering amount of regional variation in Chinese cuisine "authentic Chinese" could be anything.

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

>I think it really depends if you saw one crazy Korean dude did it, or a whole town is doing it.

What if it was just one family? Or two families? What if it's a half a small town? Who is the great arbiter of authenticity here?

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

>If someone says that he has had authentic Kagoshima ramen, then it is much more descriptive. Or someone says that he has classic Chicago pizza.

The words that matter in those examples are the regions - Kagoshima and Chicago. Try repeating the same phrase without the word "authentic" and it is just as descriptive.

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

While reading through the thread and comments here something popped up in my head. What about the term "traditional"? What does it mean culinarily and where does it intersect with "authentic"?

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

I don't want to generalize too much but there's definitely a big movement in Korean (and also Japanese I think) culture that wants to just fuck around and do all sorts of weird shit with food. That's how you end up with stuff like this: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_xgr9IqyR4Xw...

Is it an abomination? Is it still pizza? Would it be "authentic" if a pizza shop in Italy made the same thing?

Have a look at this dish:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-35...

It's supposed to be dduk bokki (spicy rice cakes) but do you even see any rice cakes in it? A few lonely pieces of rice cake and the rest is ramen and cheese (which is definitely, definitely not authentic).

And speaking of carbonara, have a look at this abomination: http://thewoman.donga.com/IMAGE/2012/...

It's carbonara dduk boki. And it has milk in it.

When presented with things like this, many Koreans seem to lap it up and beg for more.

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics
1

Our perception of "authenticity"

How many is "a lot of people?" Who decides that number?

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics

Our perception of "authenticity"

Not sure I have an answer for you beyond what MGZ presented but I laughed out loud at this:

>I can even make a cheese pizza and call it a Pajeon -- if in fact I can change any ingredient freely and still call it the same thing. Or boiling a bag of instant chicken favored noodle and call it fettuccine alfredo.

That would be pretty awesome. Imagine a restaurant did that. "This is our version."

Aug 19, 2015
joonjoon in General Topics