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Sorta odd: Where to buy kabob cart parts or the mini kabob grill in NY?

Korin Japanese kitchen supply carries several sizes Yakitori Konro, or rectangular Yakitori grills made out of heavy insulating refractory material. They are quite expensive but should last a lifetime if well cared for and kept out of the weather. I have the smallest size which can be used with the grill for small items, or without if you are using long kabob skewers. It is just about the size of a large shoebox. Plus, Korin is local to you.
Hope this helps!

http://korin.com/Shop/Table-Top-Cooking

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Korin
57 Warren St, New York, NY 10007

Mar 25, 2011
klieglight2 in Manhattan

Looking for best beginner Thai cookbook

Thank you very much for your suggestions. You bring up some very good points, as, now that I think of it, Thompson's book is very clear and gives a really wonderful background and insight on the cuisine. It's a wonderful read and a gorgeous book as well and would make a great gift in itself.

In the end if she decides that it is not for her, she still would have a great reference book, and something to add to her small cookbook library.

Thank you very much!

Dec 07, 2010
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Looking for best beginner Thai cookbook

I haven't posted anything on CH for years, but I thought some more experienced Thai food loving cooks might be able to weigh in.

A friend of mine, living in rural PA absolutely adores Thai food and has expressed interest to me in learning to cook some dishes herself. Granted, she has only had somewhat Americanized restaurant fare, and she is capable but somewhat inexperienced in the kitchen.

I thought it would be a great Christmas gift idea to get her some sort of Thai cookbook and perhaps some key ingredients
All my Thai cookbooks are quite comprehensive and tend to be a bit daunting to the novice (Even I lose my enthusiasm to cook Thai when reading the ingredient lists in some of David Thompson's massive book)
Any suggestions for a Thai or Thai-fusion-style cookbook that would be just the thing for a beginner to really enjoy experimenting with? Perhaps not classically authentic, but something that is not going to completely intimidate or overwhelm the novice.

I mention she is in rural PA, where Asian groceries are very difficult to find, but I have ready access near Philadelphia, so I would be able to help out with ingredients and "tech support."

Thanks for any suggestions!

Dec 06, 2010
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Best Peanut Butter

I have to 2nd the Crazy Richard's. In my opinion, even though there is nothing added at all, it has a natural sweetness and freshness that most of the other "natural" peanut butter brands I have tried lack. I am sure home roasting and grinding would be best, but the CR's is fine for me.
Interestingly, the latest jar I purchased made no mention about stirring in the oil, and sure enough, it was perfectly spreadable and mixed as is! Not sure what they did to the method of grinding/mixing, but it sure works and the taste seems as fresh as ever. Perhaps it would still eventually separate, but I was amazed I didn't have to spend several minutes working all the oil in as I normally do.

Cheers!

Jan 25, 2010
klieglight2 in General Topics

What do Chowhounds do for a living (besides eat of course)? [old]

I'll keep my mouth shut about the things I have done to get rid of the furry "guests" that invade my house, knowing that a lot of folks around here would frown upon such things!
Back to the thread topic, my user name "klieglight" refers to the fact I started out as a theater lighting designer and technician and still do work servicing theatrical lighting dimmer systems etc. Klieglight was a trade name used by Kliegl Bros. formerly the largest and oldest manufacturer of stage lighting equipment in the US.
I got out of the live entertainment industry altogether since I hated being on the road constantly and the weird hours that it demanded, not to mention the lousy pay.

Jan 11, 2010
klieglight2 in Not About Food

What do Chowhounds do for a living (besides eat of course)? [old]

I may live in a great old house, but unfortunately, I do have actual noisy neighbors who are constantly messing about with noisy cars and motorcycles in their backyard. That, and a whole host of four legged critters that infest this old place including squirrels, mice, etc. that do a great job of getting into the kitchen and generally creating a mess in the middle of the night.

Cheers!

Jan 11, 2010
klieglight2 in Not About Food

What do Chowhounds do for a living (besides eat of course)? [old]

I initially was not going to add to this lengthy thread, but seeing the last entry, I have to add my similar situation. By trade I am a self-employed electronics technician specializing in restoration of vintage hifi and recording studio equipment, and I also do contract work on modern high end audio gear for various customers. I am secondarily the caretaker of a large historic estate in Berks Co. Pennsylvania and live and work in a creepy old circa 1760 inn building complete with walk in fireplace and bread oven in my kitchen. My overhead is low since utilities are paid for in return for endless mowing in the summer, and dealing with rodents and all manner of fun in the winter.
I have little spending money for eating out, and there are few options for such where I live, but I enjoy cooking at every opportunity I get. Since I am single and work from home, I don't always have much motivation to cook for myself and revert back to very depressing eating habits, but I never fail to jump at the chance to try new cuisine, or attempt to cook it myself when the mood strikes.
Another plus, where I live is equipped with a full professional kitchen in a modern wing, since the building is used for catered events, etc.
I'll now go back to quietly checking Chowhound daily for interesting threads!
Cheers

Jan 09, 2010
klieglight2 in Not About Food

Mail Order Fruitcake

I'll second the Gethsemani Abbey recommendation. Very boozy, moist texture and complex flavor like a good steamed Christmas/Plum pudding.

Another one of my favorites is the fruitcake made by Holy Cross Abbey.

https://www.monasteryfruitcake.org/pr...

Similar to the Gethsemani, but a more delicate, sweeter booziness, with a somewhat drier texture (not necessarily a negative thing) and larger chunks of high quality fruits n' nuts.

I love both, and they really are a welcome change from what most people associate with the much maligned fruitcake.

Jan 06, 2010
klieglight2 in General Topics

ISO "The Swiss Cookbook" by Nika Stand Hazelton - [Cheese] Fondue Recipe

I'm away visiting family as well, but returning home late tonight. If someone hasn't already done so by then, I'll post the recipe. Never tried it myself, I will have to do so, as a proper cheese fondue is one of my favorites.

Dec 30, 2009
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

amish kitchen of the 1980s.. [Moved from Site Talk]

Perhaps this thread should be moved to the Media and News board, but I recall this show as well. A quick search only came up with the Marcia Adams "Amish Cooking from Quilt Country" which aired in the late 1980's, but it sure looks like what I remember. At the time, I did not pay much attention to cooking shows save for Julia Child and the also great long-running PBS/WGBH "Great Chefs" series.

Apr 01, 2009
klieglight2 in Food Media & News

Pellet grill or Kamado style?

I second the BGE suggestion. I am a long time user of the similar Imperial Kamado, and have to say I don't think I will ever consider another metal grill/smoker, unless it is the old cast iron "hibachi" that I use for things that don't require a covered grill. My Kamado is a bit more fragile than the BGE since it is the old fashioned earthenware instead of hi-temp ceramic, but I love it and find it hard to really ruin things on it. Did some fantastic tandoori style chicken skewers over the weekend, and the earthenware construction worked like a charm. I did not have the temp quite high enough so they had to cook longer than I wanted, but they were still moist and juicy.
I'd say go for the Imperial Kamado or BGE all the way.

May 27, 2008
klieglight2 in Cookware

Please help settle dispute with my Mom

Having just returned from a Memorial Day picnic with my family here in Central PA, I have to say there were at least 2 potato salads there, both including hard boiled eggs in some sort of mayonnaise based dressing.
While I actually prefer a non-mayonnaise potato salad in the German style, (and my family usually makes it this way for personal consumption) I sort of have come to expect hard boiled eggs in any "typical" potato salad.
Then again, I think everyone has their own take on what constitutes the perfect or "typical" potato salad.

May 26, 2008
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Mayflower Bakery Questions

I will be in/around Center City Philadelphia this coming Monday morning for an appointment, and I was hoping to try Mayflower bakery on Race for a few buns and a cup of coffee for breakfast, but I just wanted to make sure of a few things,
First, I can't find their hours anywhere, so I hope they will be open on a Monday about 8 am.
Second, do they actually serve coffee? Doesnt have to be great, just something vaguely resembling coffee with caffeine.

Third, any good breakfast reccs? I prefer savory things, so pork buns, etc, or at least not too sweet steamed/baked buns of some sort.

Thanks!

May 17, 2008
klieglight2 in Pennsylvania

Komado cooker

Coastie,

It is probably way too late to be of any help, seeing all the excellent responses you have already gotten, but just in case, for replacement parts for the old Japanese made Kamados, the people to talk to are at:

http://www.imperialkamado.com which is the main website for the last source for the original earthenware type Kamados. Their site will direct you to the current distributor, in NY state at http://www.kamadoking.s5.com He has replacement parts for the #3 and #5 Kamados, and can probably help you out with almost any issue.

(disclaimer) I have no financial interest in Imperial Kamado, but I know they are good to work with, and I love my Japanese made #3 Kamado which I bought new about 15 years ago along with a 1960's version which is almost identical.

I do know that the ceramics used for the Big Green Egg and Kamado Co. Kamado, may not be compatible with the expansion rates of the old style earthenware, so it is best to use the correct earthenware replacement parts for things like fireboxes etc.

Indeed, the earthenware models do require a bit more care in use than the hi-temp ceramics, but then again their original use was for steaming of rice, not grilling at 700 degrees.

Hope this helps

May 16, 2008
klieglight2 in Cookware

Wok cooking : hotter equals better?

I think my wok is a fairly cheap, ancient 15" hammered carbon steel model with a single (pan style) handle, which I strongly prefer over the small loop style handles found on some woks, so you can have something cool to hold on to while vigorously stirring etc. I would certainly caution against the non-stick wok, as the coating probably would not hold up, as you suggest. With a well seasoned steel wok, I have not had things stick at all with a little bit of care.
I agree with the suggestions as far as technique is concerned, as discussed further down in this thread, but believe me, I am still learning myself!

May 15, 2008
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Wok cooking : hotter equals better?

Alkapal and takadi, that stove is pretty much the same as mine, although it seems like numerous cultures around the world have used very similar portable cooking appliances.
I think I may have posted this in a thread a while ago re: wok cooking over charcoal, but I got my stove here:

http://grocerythai.com/thai-charcoal-...

Works great, and cheap. The heat is absolutely blistering with a good fire using lump charcoal, but very even. Due to the wide heating area, the "hot spot" may extend up the sides of the wok more than you are used to.
Disclaimer, of course, do this outside only, but I have a circa 1700's working walk in fireplace in the kitchen that I use it in when the weather is bad.

(you could do meat on skewers with a smaller fire, and perhaps a grill put overtop if necessary, a-la-yakitori, but an actual tandoor is a deep, barrel shaped clay oven, I believe)

May 15, 2008
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Wok cooking : hotter equals better?

I just wanted to add my own personal experience this week, regarding more heat and Wok cooking. I did a batch of fried rice over a white hot charcoal fire in a traditional Thai portable stove, which is basically a clay-lined bucket which is meant for cooking in a round bottomed pan like a wok. Simple but effective. Previously, I never had much success in getting that wonderful, almost caramelized (but not scorched) quality to the rice on a normal stove burner. With the charcoal fire, which I bet you could have forged metal in, I had tremendous success, but it required extremely quick action, and organization to keep things moving while ingredients were added so as not to completely blacken and scorch something.
That said, yes, the more heat the better, but with it goes increased demand for good technique, which I am still working on!

May 14, 2008
klieglight2 in Home Cooking

Gamble Mill Inn - Bellefonte

I wish I could comment if there are any plans to re-open Schnitzel's somewhere else, but so far I have heard nothing to that effect. I know the Kemptons, owners of Schnitzel's, have opened the Olde New York Restaurant in State College, and have carried over some of the German favorites to that menu. They opened last year I believe, and I enjoyed the meal I had there, but the ambiance is not nearly the cozy basement pub-like experience Schnitzel's was.
Back on the Gamble Mill Subject, glad to hear there are positive reviews regarding the current status. I may very well consider them for a belated Mother's Day celebration.

May 07, 2008
klieglight2 in Pennsylvania

Calling all pork bun eaters....

Just a question, as I may be mistaken. The 1968 photo I referenced earlier actually shows a shop called "Mee Sum Mee Tea Shop & Pastry" with no street address visible. It's clearly a different storefront than what is now known as Mee Sum Cafe. Same place, different location? or are/were these places unrelated?
Just wondering if there could have been multiple Mee Sum's at one time.
Thanks

May 02, 2008
klieglight2 in Manhattan

Calling all pork bun eaters....

I have a 1968 edition of Time-Life's "Foods of The World- American Cooking: The Melting Pot" volume that has a photo of Mee Sum, so it has to be at least that old.
In fact, I have fond memories of Mee Sum while visiting a friend in NY and desperately seeking a great but unpretentious cup of coffee to help a splitting headache and head cold. We stopped in there, and I honestly cannot remember having a more satisfying cup of coffee since then. I had a red bean filled pastry that was quite tasty as well, not too sweet with a nice earthy-beany flavor.

May 01, 2008
klieglight2 in Manhattan

wok in charcoal grill?

Bear,
I actually purchased my first shichirin several years ago from Marukai supermarkets in CA, and they graciously shipped it to me in PA. The second one was bought from the Imperial Kamado company, www.imperialkamado.com, but I don't think they carry them any longer since the original owner retired and the distributorship moved to NY state.
The third was an Ebay purchase of a never used shichirin from the 1960's which I keep as a backup
Finally, a Thai version of a similar charcoal brazier perfect for wok cooking is available at Grocery Thai online

http://grocerythai.com/thai-charcoal-...

Hope this helps!
Regards

Apr 30, 2008
klieglight2 in Cookware

outdoor wood stove plans

As a major fan of the classic tile/masonry kitchen ranges or "kachelherde" of Germany and Austria, I was thinking that a design of this nature might be adaptable to an outdoor kitchen. Perhaps the only option over here in the US as most houses are not constructed to withstand a masonry structure of several tons in the kitchen!
Pictured is an antique tile range in an Austrian farmhouse. Iron cook top is to the right, heated by the firebox on the right side not very visible in the photo. The double ovens with their doors open are also heated by this firebox. In the middle angled section, the smaller double doors (closed) are for a built-in brick bread oven, direct fired with wood in the traditional method. The larger double doors to the far left with firebox door beneath enclose a vertical smoking chamber or "selchkammer". Typically used for hot or cold smoking meats. All fireboxes and the bread oven vent into a common chimney.
Oh how I would love one of these in my kitchen, but perhaps an outdoor version is more feasible

Apr 30, 2008
klieglight2 in Cookware

wok in charcoal grill?

I have had fantastic success using a wok over lump charcoal in a Japanese "shichirin". basically a round, bucket shaped brazier made of an earthenware material. It actually has 3 rounded protrusions on top that are perfectly designed to support a round bottomed pan like a wok. Pretty much the kind of heat source the wok was designed for and has been traditionally used for millenia.

Apr 24, 2008
klieglight2 in Cookware

Mei Lai Wah closed by DOH?!?

Any update on the Mei Lai Wah situation? Being from PA, I usually have limited free time when I am in Manhattan, but I was hoping to stop in the next time I was in the city. I can't imagine a place that was going strong for so many years would not be able to rebound from a DOH closing.
Thanks and regards!

Apr 24, 2008
klieglight2 in Manhattan

Gamble Mill Inn - Bellefonte

I too, would love to hear someone's opinions. I grew up in Bellefonte, and I was offered a belated birthday dinner there the next time I go home to visit family. I have not been there in years, and I hope the new owners will keep the same feel, yet perhaps keep the menu offerings interesting and fresh.
My usual favorite for a celebration dinner was Schnitzel's Tavern, but that has not been an option since the tragic Bush House fire several years ago.

Apr 19, 2008
klieglight2 in Pennsylvania

Your favorite sandwich. Ones you make at home.

I had a good laugh regarding your "golf" sandwich! One of the first sandwiches I had at a restaurant when I was a kid was a club sandwich, in the dining room of the country club where my father (and avid golfer) was a member. I honestly thought that this sandwich was so named because it was served at the country club! To this day, the connection between club sandwiches and golf is forever ingrained.

Apr 07, 2008
klieglight2 in General Topics

Rolings Bakery Elkins Park Questions

Many thanks for the info. Would Rolings happen to be open Sundays? If so, I can take the R3/West Trenton inbound to Elkins Park the next time I am visiting a friend in Yardley.
Getting hungry as I type.
Regards!

Apr 07, 2008
klieglight2 in Pennsylvania

Old, traditional bakeries/pastry shops that still exist

Thank you everyone for taking the time to suggest things. I will certainly have to check some of these places out if I have some spare time the next time I am in Manhattan. Can't wait to get to Orwashers in particular. I have not had a good rye in ages.
Thanks again.

Apr 06, 2008
klieglight2 in Manhattan

Old, traditional bakeries/pastry shops that still exist

Just wanted to thank everyone who took the time to contribute. I had a feeling there might be a lot of interesting places still out there. I am sure I won't be able to visit all the suggestions since I only get to the city once in a while on business, but I appreciate the help. If I had local bakers to support, I would, but there isn't much here in PA between Lancaster and Philadelphia. I agree with Tay and dhs, if people don't patronize the smaller "old style" bakeries etc. eventually our choices might indeed be limited to whats available at the local mega-superdupermart store.
Regards
Doug

Apr 06, 2008
klieglight2 in Outer Boroughs

Rolings Bakery Elkins Park Questions

I have been hungry for really good bagels recently, but have not had one in years since I can't stand the overly sweet, puffy, insipid blobs that pass for bagels around here for the most part. From what I gather, Rolings is really a great choice for a good, dense traditional style bagel, so I would like to make a trip, but I have a few questions.

First, they are still around aren't they?

Second, It will be a good hour's drive one way for me, so I would like to stock up while I am there. Do they have anything other than bagels available? Good breads, etc. are always a plus for me.

Third, I understand that they are Shomer Shabbos, but other than that, I am having trouble finding their business hours. Best times to go?

Someone a while ago said they were hard to find. Any hints as to what to look for? Parking?

I appreciate your help! Thanks in advance.

Apr 04, 2008
klieglight2 in Pennsylvania