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NMculinary's Profile

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Best restaurant for posole in NM?

Looking for restaurants serving traditional posole made of nixtamal, pork or chicken, hearty broth and chile. No canned hominy or home recipes, please.

Jul 22, 2012
NMculinary in Southwest

Oyster lover needs help

Will be in Seattle 5/30 and need a sit down place at lunch to down an oyster, or two, or three... Spending the AM at the Market and have a 2:00 pm reservation at the new Chihuly Museum. Can't walk far due to arthritis but woud use taxi if necessary. Hear very mixed reviews for Watson's.

Looking for freshness and good value for price. Since it is the end of May, what varieties are best in this marginal season? Hood Canal?

May 11, 2012
NMculinary in Greater Seattle

Clovis, NM, restaurants

Anyone got a handle on restaurants in Clovis? Since the Guadalajara Cafe closed, I'm at a loss. With Cannon Air Force Base located there, must be some decent places to eat. Help!

Jan 05, 2009
NMculinary in Southwest

Albuquerque--dining with kids

Monroe's is a family place especially favored by us locals. The name is deceptive. It's basically a New Mexican restaurant with locations on Lomas near Old Town and at 6051 Osuna NE. The food is good, fast, and they have a children's menu. Everyone has a favorite place for green chile cheeseburgers, but I'll put my money on Monroe's. My husband favors their seafood enchiadas.

Jan 05, 2009
NMculinary in Southwest

Taos restaurants

Searching for new-ish Taos restaurants not serving Mexican or New Mexican cuisine. Do know about the old stand-bys: Joseph's Table, Doc Martins, Trading Post, Apple Tree, De la Terra, Lambert's, etc.

Especially looking for reviews of El Meze, Sabroso, Graham's Grill, Chef Damon's. Anyone eaten at these places recently?

Oct 21, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Cooking Schools in Jalisco?

Help!! Need recommendations for cooking schools in Jalisco, i.e. Puerto Vallarta, Lake Chapala, Guadalajara, even Tequila. Any ideas?

Sep 25, 2008
NMculinary in Mexico

Iron Chef NM

Heads up, New Mexico chowhounds! Just heard that Martin Rios, executive chef of the Inn of the Anasazi in Santa Fe, will go mano-a-mano with Bobby Flay Sunday, April 20, on Food Network's Iron Chef. Martin is a fantastic chef and a credit to Santa Fe, which has a surfeit of greats. A native of Guadalajara who worked his way up in the trade from the most menial positions, he was at The Old House in the Eldorado before moving on to his current position at the Anasazi..

Apr 15, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Unfair?

I am confused. You removed all mention of my book on New Mexico cuisine and my travel blog and informed me it was not allowed. Now I see the mention of another author's book by what I presume is a third party: "Look for a book called NEW MEXICO CHOW by Scott Sherot and published by The Intrepid Traveler. I got mine through Amazon, but I did see it for sale at many places around NM. It was very very helpful on a couple of trips and I found the reviews to be spot-on accurate."

Now really, is this fair? As I've said before, I've referred people to my book and blog as a quick and easy way to get information, not as self-promotion.
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Mar 31, 2008
NMculinary in Site Talk

I'm new. (Living in Albuquerque)

Latest Asian food tip, and I welcome comments. Spoke yesterday with Thai friend, and she recommended Siam Cafe on San Mateo. Said they make the food the way she likes it. Anyone eaten there? How does it compare to Thai Orchid or Crystal Thai?

Mar 24, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Zacatecas

Any suggestions on best places to eat in Zacatecas? Also any info on best regional foods or best stalls in city market?

Mar 21, 2008
NMculinary in Mexico

trying to become a green chile convert, denver

Little Anita's is an Albuquerque firm. Didn't know they had expanded to CO, but they should have decent green. Good luck

Mar 14, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

trying to become a green chile convert, denver

Megan--

I don't know what they've been serving you in Denver area, but in New Mexico green chile is our national dish. It's not really considered a sauce but a type of stew. It is made with roasted green New Mexico or Anaheim chiles, not tomatillos or tomatoes, and may or may not contain meat, usually pork.

I've had hundreds of variation on same, but the absolutely best I've ever eaten was at a little place called El Norteno in Las Vegas, New Mexico (not to be mistaken for Vegas, NV). It's owned by Ray and Jennifer Velasquez, and Ray is the chef. I can't remember his precise recipe, but I do recall his procedure is a bit different from the usual. I've got to get back up there some day and pry the recipe out of him.

In the meantime, I might suggest you look up one of Jane Butel's cookbooks. She teaches cooking classes in Albuquerque, and she knows what she's doing. You also might check The Whole Chile Pepper Book by Dave DeWitte and Nancy Gerlach. Dave is our Mr. Chile, and he's the entrepreneur who brings the Fiery Foods Show to ABQ every year.

Mar 12, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

ABQ Mexican Goodies

If you live in Albuquerque's West Side, there's a new taco restaurant in the Quail Run shopping center off Coors and I 40. This is not your Taco Bell but real Mexican street food cleaned up The setting is modest, a small storefront restaurant in a minimall.

Pastorero Taco Grill serves five classics starting with Tacos al Pastor, five tacos served on warm corn tortillas with marinated pork roasted on an upright rotisserie and garnished with grilled pineapple, onions and cilantro. Yum! My less adventurous husband had the Torta de Alambre, a Mexican sandwich filled with carne asada, bacon, ham, grilled onions and bell peppers. Both items were so good, we decided to share an order of their flan, and it too was delicious

The menu includes a salsa bar, appitizers like tortilla soup, sides like ensalada chica, desserts, and real Mexican Coke (they use cane sugar, not high fructose corn syrup like the US Cokes).

While you're at Quail Run, walk down a couple stores from Pastorero, and you'll find Carniceria Enriquez, a Mexican grocery store, the first on the West Side to my knowledge. It has a full complement of meat, groceries, Mexican cheeses, etc., and it too is clean and well-run. Their meats are the best I've seen in ABQ carnicerias, and two flank steaks we purchased for dinner had great flavor.

A big plus is that they carry corn tortillas from Tortilleria Cuauhtemoc, a Bridge Street operation which IMHO makes the best fresh daily in ABQ. Another big plus is the owners, Max and Jeccika (say Jessica) Enriquez. They are bilungual, a big help is your Spanish is not up to par.

Pastorero Taco Grill
2641 Coors Blvd. NW
Albuquerque 87120
505-839-7000
www.pastorero.com

Carniceria Enriquez
2641 Coors NW
505-836-3288

.

Mar 12, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Santa Fe - large group

Gee, guys. I replied to lotuseedpaste yesterday, and somehow the post got lost in the ether. Maybe the chowhound powers that be didn't like my mentioning my book and my blog.

Before we get into specific places, I'd warn you that Santa Fe in summer is crawling with tourists, and with your group you need to contact the restaurant or make a reservation, no matter what. This goes double for the big weekends of Spanish Market in July and Indian Market in August.

With prior notice, I'd send you to The Plaza for lunch. As its name suggests, it's right on the plaza and a short walk from the Inn on the Alameda. Their menu is eclectic--everything from New Mexican to Greek, and their prices are some of the most reasonable in Santa Fe. The food is good and the desserts outstanding.

For a special dinner, I'd get in touch with La Fonda Hotel, again right on the plaza. This is the classic Santa Fe hosterly and a fabulous place for its history and decor. They might fit you into their lovely La Plazuela restaurant or they could devote a special function room to your party. This also holds true for other large hotels with good kitchens such as The Inn of the Anasazi or El Dorado Hotel.

Can't help you out for take out, but of course there are all the usual chains on Cerillos Road--Pizza Hut, etc. Speaking of Cerillos Road, breakfasts at The Pantry or Tecolote are NM classics. Doubt they could handle the whole group, but some of your party might want to break out a bit.

Mar 10, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Santa Fe - large group

Hmm. Last time I checked, Sadie's was in Albuquerque. Yes, it's good New Mex chow, but I think it's a bit far for this purpose.

Mar 10, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

I'm new. (Living in Albuquerque)

OK, we tried Lin's on Coors for Chinese. It's just another "all you can eat buffet," no better or no worse than its bretheren. In its favor it does have a sushi chef on site making fresh selections, and it has a grill where you can select ingredients for the cook to stir fry. Given my preference, I'll stick with some of our good Thai and Vietnamese restaurants when I go Asian.

Mar 06, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Southwestern Fare in Santa Fe

If you are looking for good, inexpensive, informal New Mexican restaurants, you need to trawl Cerillos Road. Several good, inexpensive restaurants on Cerillos include Tortilla Flats for NM grub and Los Potrillos for NM/Mexican. Horseman's Haven on Cerillos near the Interstate is a sleeper for those who REALLY like their chile hot. For breakfasts try The Pantry or Tecolote, also on Cerillos.

Mar 06, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Grand Canyon

The closest town with a selection of restaurants is Williams, the terminus of the Grand Canyon Railway. They have a dozen or so eateries--none fantastic but a foray into town might be a change from park cuisine.

Mar 03, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Farmington, NM

Actually Farmington is a great town for lunch. Try Something Special Bakery & Tea Room on North Auburn. Housed in a small cottage with an outdoor dining porch, the restaurant serves a different special every day. Downtown Andrea Kristina Bookstore and Kafe is another possibility. Sandwiches are named after great authors, and their Jane Austen Waldorf Tuna rocks. For dinner, you have Three Rivers or for New Mexican chow, try Los Hermanitos on East Main or their new location on West Main.

Mar 03, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

I'm new. (Living in Albuquerque)

Yes, Chow has two ABQ locations and one in Santa Fe. And thanks for the restaurant name. I'll check it out.

Feb 29, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Fairfield Inn Santa Fe on Cerrillos Road

The Pantry is tops, but also try Tortilla Flats. It's open B, L, D, and it's another local favorite.

Feb 28, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Albuquerque Lunch?

Not too far off the Big I, where Interstates 40 and 25 cross, El Modelo has some of the best New Mexican food in Albuquerque. My favorite is the burrito carne desebrada. It's only a take out, but you could combine your stop with a visit to nearby National Spanish Heritage Cultural Center. You can order any item without cheese.

Feb 28, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

In NM for the first time...

International Delights Cafe is one of my favorite places in Las Cruces. It's informal, reasonable, and serves a variety of Mediterannean fare in addition to cooking supplies. Their baklava is wonderful and comes in pecan, walnut or pistachio. I've also enjoyed Old Mesilla Pastry Cafe a few blocks off the plaza on Old Route 28. Their breakfasts are awesome.

As you trudge on and on up I 25, you might want to stop in Truth or Consequences. If you like fresh, organic ingredients and innovative specials, the White Coyote Cafe at 113 Main is the place for you.

Next up is Socorro. The Socorro Springs Brewing Company is good, but for the REAL New Mexican cooking, seek out La Pasadita at 230 Garfield.

By the time you reach Albuquerque and then Santa Fe, your choices are legion. My book "Culinary New Mexico" lists over 85 pages of possibilities including bakeries, specialty food stores, restaurants, and wineries. One real ABQ sleeper is El Modelo, a take-out joint near the Spanish Cultural Center. Their burritos carne desebradas are to die for!

Feb 28, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

I'm new. (Living in Albuquerque)

Well, the mystery is over. Lin's is opening this weekend with much Chinese hoopla--dragons, fireworks, etc. From article in ABQ Journal, we find it's actually a chain with 14 locations in Texas. They will have a Mongolian barbecue station, a sushi station, three hot buffets and a cold food line in addition to all-you-can-eat ribeye steak station. Prices run around $7 for lunch and $10 for dinner. I plan to give it a try and will report back.

Feb 28, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

I'm new. (Living in Albuquerque)

I'd second (or third, or fourth, or...) everyone's opinion that we lack an abundance of good Chinese restaurants. So many seem to be "all you can eat" buffets including the new and extravagantly constructed "Lin's" on Coors across from Cottonwood Mall. It hasn't opened to date so let's give them a chance to prove that most Chinese buffets aren't worth the time.

Living on the West Side, we ususally go to Chow's Bistro in the mall. Can't give you a rundown on the whole menu because I always order the beef noodle soup, which is enough for two and blistering hot even for this NM gal.

Claire is correct about our terrific world market. It's called Ta Lin, and it's on the corner of Central and Louisiana. It's quite an operation, aisles upon aisles of food products from all over the world, not just Asia. If you haven't discovered it, give it a try. And by the way, what's the name of your restaurant? I'm always up for a new place serving New Mexican food.

Feb 24, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Corn Tortillas in Albuquerque

Wow! Have I got the place for your dad. The best corn tortillas in Albuquerque are at Tortilleria Cuauhtemoc on Bridge Street SW. In researching my book, Culinary New Mexico, my husband and I did the rounds, tasting and rating tortillas. Cuauhtemoc won hands down. They are made fresh throughout the day and are sold only in packages of 36. That's a lot of tortillas, but you can freeze those you can't use immediately. A caution: if you don't speak Spanish, you'll be reduced to charades. Not really a problem.

If you're seeking flour tortillas, those at the Frontier Restaurant on Central SE are tops--freshly made throughout the day and very light. Second place for flour tortillas was Dos Hermanos on 4th Street NW. They're huge and somewhat more expensive than most of their bretheren.

Jan 29, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

New Bakery in Albuquerque

Not yet, but thanks for the heads-up. There's lots of new restaurants in the NW part of town, both locally owned and chain. One of our favorite lunch spots is Viet Rice in the Rio Rancho Smith's mini-mall. Their pho is our usual, but we've tried almost everything on the menu and can report no disappointments.

Jan 29, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest

Need the Scoop on Albuquerque.

Lucky you! You'll be staying at one of the finest properties in New Mexico, and its correct name is the Hyatt Regency Tamaya. It is located on Santa Ana Pueblo, about 20 miles north of Albuquerque. Their on-site restaurant, "The Corn Maiden," is not to be missed, but it will not accommodate a large group. You might want to try "The Prarie Star," also on Santa Ana land. The food is fantastic and the ambiance exceptional. It is located in an old hacienda.

If you're from the East, you'll find New Mexico restaurants reasonable. Santa Fe does have several which compare to New York prices, but generally the bill will be considerably less.

If you decide to drive into Albuquerque for a night on the town, you might want to try El Pinto (see www.elpinto.com), especially if you're coming in spring, summer or fall. Their extensive gardens are lovely with fountains and strolling mariachis. They can handle a crowd.

For an unusual experience, take the aerial tram to the top of the Sandia Mountains as dusk begins to fall and the lights of the city begin their evening show. You could eat at High Finance at the summit or Santiago's at the base. Nearby Country Line Barbecue is another alternative for diners taking the tram.

Now if you're looking for food items to take back to your husband, you'll want to add green chile to your list. It's the state veggie, and no New Mexican can live long without a generous dose. You can find it frozen (the best alternative to fresh) in any grocery, but if you don't want to bother with a cold pack, it also comes in a jar. Another chile product you can't find anywhere else is Chimayo red chile, grown in a tiny town north east of Santa Fe where you'll find the Santuario de Chimayo, a healing site. The chile is sold dried and should be available most anywhere. The last item should be blue corn meal, and since Santa Ana Pueblo produces most of the U.S. blue corn, you shouldn't have trouble finding some to take home.

Have fun and enjoy our Land of Enchantment.

Jan 25, 2008
NMculinary in Southwest