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What's for Dinner - #345 - the Winter Doldrums Already? Edition

I first tried crispy edge eggs in a Kylie Kwong recipe. She garnished hers with scallions, chilies and oyster sauce and I immediately fell in love. I've got to try this salad next!

about 5 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking
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Carmelizing Onions in the Oven for Indian recipes

The garlic and ginger are usually added to Indian food after the onions are browned so that their flavor remains prominent. Adding your spices too early will also change their flavor profile, which is why good Indian recipes tell you exactly when in the cooking process to add spices and whether or not they should be added whole, toasted, cooked in oil, etc. a

The good news is that your garlic, ginger and spices only need to be cooked briefly once your onions are browned so you are not pressed for time.

Jan 22, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking
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Your Fave 'Around the World' Condiments. .

If you like it hot, Bedekar lime pickle and Ahmed mixed pickle are famously spicy. I haven't tried Priya before, but now that I know they make Andhra Pradesh style pickles, I'm interested in seeing how they stack up against the Ahmed pickles.

Jan 22, 2015
JungMann in General Topics

What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

I simmered the ears for a couple hours with mirepoix and spices and am drying them between paper towels with a generous amount of kosher salt, weighted so they dry flat. I'll julienne them and deep fry for a couple minutes at 350F in my wok, drain, salt and serve. You don't have to chop the ears to get them crisp, of course. In fact one of my favorite parts of a pig roast is pulling pieces of the super crispy ears to eat like chips on the side of my plate.

What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

I was really in the mood for Persian food after last week's discussion on WFD so I tried a roast Persian chicken recipe I found on the Feasting at Home blog. I'm not sure if the spice blend is typical of Persian cuisine, but the flavors were incredible. There's sweetness from the combination of star anise and coriander, warmth from cinnamon and clove all with a smokey backbone from cumin. On the side I served the spinach, almond and date salad from Jerusalem that enjoyed nearly universal love when the book was featured on COTM. And that love is well-deserved; quick pickling the dates turn them into a wonderfully balanced accent in a salad.

Tonight it's salad again: frisee with crispy pig ears and poached egg. I have two ears to cook tonight so I may try doing a second dish of pig ears tossed with calamansi juice, fish sauce, sambal and yuzu kosho if I'm in the mood to pig out.

Your Fave 'Around the World' Condiments. .

I'm not sure if Marmite is commonplace where you are, but it's a beloved toast topper for me. If you are looking for more international choices, I'd recommend Swad chutneys (coriander and tamarind are my favorites), Brooklyn Delhi tomato achaar, Matouk's hot pepper sauce, Lao Gan Ma chilli crisp and perhaps some kaya coconut jam for dessert.

What is that salty pepper paste in Chinese restaurants?

It's not doubanjiang. Doubanjiang contains no vinegar and isn't typically paired with dim sum. What you're describing is simply Chinese chili sauce. Sriracha is the dominant brand in the US for Thai chili sauce; Koon Chun and Lee Kum Kee are both reliable brands for the Chinese version.

Jan 21, 2015
JungMann in General Topics

Supermarket Oyster Sauce question

While neither oyster sauce is going to be great, Kikkoman is less adulterated than Kame oyster sauce. I'd skip the citric acid and soybeans and purchase the Kikkoman. Better yet, I'd wait until I could get some Lee Kum Kee oyster sauce and make a different stir fried noodle tonight.

Jan 21, 2015
JungMann in General Topics
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What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

So it's not heresy to dip kimbap in sushi soy? I grew up on the stuff, but I never knew if one ought to have anything more exciting than pickled daikon as a condiment.

Jan 20, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

Chicken Cacciatore?

I think if you search for chicken parmesan recipes, you'll find what you're looking for.

Jan 19, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking
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What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

And how! Who knew that tuna fish would be my madeleine? I especially liked the silky texture of these croquettes. I want to try them with shami kabab spices next.

What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

I decided to keep my experimental phase going this January and tried christinamason's tuna croquette recipe. Tuna croquettes were my mother's specialty growing up. That said, I haven't had one in probably 15 years, but I vaguely remember them being fairly heavy with potato, typically greasy, very lightly seasoned: a kind of blah crowd-pleaser. So imagine my happy surprise biting into christinamason's light, tender tuna cakes, delicate with a whisper of bite from mustard. They were the culinary equivalent of a retouched family photo with all the blurs and photo grains smoothed and improved. Every morsel tasted of pure nostalgia, bringing my blurry memories of childhood dinner into focus and a mother's son back to her knee. In a nod to tradition, I served my croquettes with fry sauce because no Midwestern fish dinner is complete without mayo and ketchup is a vegetable, dammit! Salad on the side with green goddess dressing.

It used to be that my Friday indulgence was a tuna melt, salt and vinegar chips and a grape soda. But these delightful tuna croquettes and a crisp salad might just upend that tradition. I'm still keeping the grape soda, though.

Stocking a new pantry....best condiments?

Of the condiments you've mentioned, I'm only brand-loyal to oyster sauce and fish sauce: Mae Krua and Tiparos, respectively. They have the right hint of sweetness to balance out spicy cuisine, but fit in well wherever you use them. For hot sauces I keep Sriracha, Lao Gan Ma, Matouk's, Tabasco, Huy Fong Sambal Oelek and Cholula on hand. Each has a time and a place.

Jan 15, 2015
JungMann in General Topics

What's for Dinner #344 - Happy MLK Day Edition! [through Jan. 21, 2015]

I always feel a bit uncomfortable when I say this, but we're having faggots for dinner. Before anyone gets the wrong idea, I should explain they're a traditional English recipe of spiced pork mixed with ground offal and wrapped in caul fat. Their one word description is a little less tricky on the tongue (even if far more tricky socially). For my recipe, I seasoned the forcemeat with white pepper, sage, ginger and a touch of ground mace for that subtle floral note. Traditionally I would have made an onion gravy to go alongside but the rendered caul fat seemed to have an unusually low smoke and ended up smoking me out of the kitchen. Instead I had a bit of beer mustard on the side and a rich of puree of butter beans with thyme and garlic to satisfy this cold winter night.

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

I made sauteed chard for lunch today. With chorizo for that Iberian flare and balanced with fermented black beans and sambal to spin it around the globe a little.

For dinner I'll treat the chard as a bed for something from the sea. Chorizo and black beans seem like such a match with clams, but I don't see that working with the chard. Perhaps I'll go for shrimp or a filet of mackerel instead.

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

Feel better, good sir.

Jan 14, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

Thanks! They look incredibly satisfying!

Jan 14, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

Marinating Chicken Adobo

And if you continue to read the rest of the article, she goes on to say "mildly acidic marinades can add wonderful flavor to fish and meat."

The key word in your quote is "very." A very acidic marinade will cause proteins to toughen in a short amount of time. But dilute the acid, maybe like soy sauce, add seasonings, perhaps garlic and ginger, and you have a perfect reasonable marinade that will imbue your meat with additional flavor over the course of a few hours.

Jan 13, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

This sounds terrific! I was craving tuna croquettes last week, but I didn't want to eat potatoes. How much almond and rice flour do you use to bind a can of tuna? I actually was looking for a lowish-carb use for the former so this sounds great!

Jan 13, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

Marinating Chicken Adobo

Marinating in vinegar will not pickle the meat. At worst there might be some denaturing of the proteins on the surface of the chicken if it is left in the marinade too long, but it will be fine overnight.

The problem I see with this recipe is the proportion of soy sauce to vinegar is reversed. Adobo usually is cooked with more vinegar than soy sauce. The recipe could also use more black pepper.

Jan 13, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking

Abnormally long lines at Fairway UES

The line at 4pm last Saturday was perhaps the most atrocious I've seen at the UES Fairway. Three lines winding through most of the first floor, obstructing customer traffic and making the store a generally hellacious experience. I've tried varying my shopping time, but it's almost impossible to predict when Fairway will get crowded. I've waited in interminable deli lines at 10am on a Saturday; I've waited in equally long check out lines at 10am on a weekday.

I don't know that there is anything Fairway can do about it. Even if all cashiers are working, there's nothing to be done if all shoppers tend to all come at the same time. Which seems to be more and more the case.

Jan 13, 2015
JungMann in Manhattan

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

I was checking out Serious Eats earlier today and came across an interesting article on foul that ended up inspiring dinner. There wasn't much to it really, a can of fava beans heated til bubbly and then mixed with garlic and cumin to be plated with a heavy drizzle of olive oil, tahini and lemon juice. To complete the meal, I had a soft boiled egg, pita bread, tomato salad, pickled peppers and freshly made yogurt. Very little work, but very satisfying with lots of different tastes to satisfy the palate.

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

Harissa is a perfect pairing (Sicam and Le Phare du Cap Bon are good brands). Sriracha is okay or, if you feel like a project, you can make Middle Eastern shatta while the chicken is marinating. Below is a basic recipe, but you can season as you like. The batch currently in my fridge is made from habaneros, Fresnos, cumin, coriander, allspice and ginger.

http://www.simplecomfortfood.com/2011...

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

It's all about the hot sauce for me. I add just enough white sauce to dress my salad and ease the burn (which, in the case of The Halal Guy's hot sauce, is considerable, requiring an extra order of white sauce).

I used the Serious Eats ingredient list as a template and and used the proportions that tasted right to me. I was wary of using parsley -- I've never seen any greenery in white sauce -- but it adds something here that makes this an improvement over most white sauce.

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

The Serious Eats version was one of the first recipes I tried at home and one of my first disappointments. I find it a rather bland approximation of the real thing, though I know the recipe has its fans. To my palate, there's nothing of the depth of spice that suggests cart chicken's Middle Eastern or subcontinental ancestry nor that spicy and tangy aroma that seduces so many New Yorkers, me included, on a daily basis.

I much prefer the Pushcart Chicken recipe for its sophisticated seasoning and simplified execution. The 12-ingredient marinade creates a beautiful spice crust without the need for SE's double cooking procedure. If anything, the Pushcart recipe yields a juicy chicken whose flavor might be a tad too complex to qualify as "street meat," not that I'm complaining. But for those concerned with "authenticity," the sweet spot for real halal cart chicken is somewhere between the underseasoned SE recipe and the gussied up Pushcart Chicken version.

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

The search for a satisfying rendition of halal cart chicken has been somewhat elusive for me over the years. Sure I can join the eager throngs lined up and down Sixth Avenue for their aluminium foiled treasure chests, but there's something more satisfying about doing it yourself. Which I haven't been able to do... Until now.

Last night's dinner was taken from "Family Table," a collection of staff meals from Danny Meyer's popular NYC restaurants. At first blush, the recipe for Pushcart Chicken seems like a line cook's drunken deep dive into the recesses of his spice cabinet, but the results speak for themselves: a gorgeously aromatic bird that I daresay improves upon my favorite cart's chicken recipe. The final dip in a combination of lime juice, sugar and salt is the key step that gives this chicken the spicy and tangy character of the best street meats. And now I can hot sauce/white sauce with the best of them!

http://bookpage.com/the-book-case/130...

Quick Simple Asian

Make a sunnyside up egg in a pot with plenty of oil so the edges crisp just a little. Plate and drizzle with oyster sauce, sliced chilies and scallions. Swoon.

Jan 11, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking
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Is "bone broth" the new marketing term for stock?

Dirt is so ten years ago.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Diet/sto...

Jan 11, 2015
JungMann in General Topics

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

Chicken Vesuvio! Now that takes me back to my early days in Chicago where chicken Vesuvio was the kind of fancy dish you imagined Da Mare eating in candlelit corners downtown. And yet Vesuvio was still just manageable enough for the average Everyman to pull off at home, adding a touch of elegance to a bungalow dinner with flecks of peas and a bit of white wine. I've got to add this back to my repertoire!

What's for Dinner #343 - the 2015 NFL Playoff Edition! [OLD. 1/15/15]

The tamarind red wine sauce sounds bold and delicious!

Jan 10, 2015
JungMann in Home Cooking
1