JungMann's Profile

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Montreal Specifics

I checked all the boucheries at JTM and couldn't find cretons in any of their cold cases (aside from a couple containers of creton de canard, which I think are rillettes?). Maybe I should have asked. It's a shame I gave up on the long line at Les Cochons Tout Ronds and missed out on their Basque Cretons. I had sampled foie gras seasoned with piment d'Esplette at Bonsecours and loved the unexpected catch in my throat. I would have happily endured the line but I think my companion was already a bit frustrated after I spent a good 40 minutes debating what items from Canards du Lack Brome and Les Saveurs du Marché could make it through border customs. Next time I travel with friends more enthusiastic about international charcuterie!

about 3 hours ago
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

WHICH FISH SAUCE? Different ones for different purposes? Oyster sauce, too.

I've used three brands from your list: Cock, Squid and Three Crabs. The first two have a strong salinity but lack complexity which makes it most useful for seasoning spicy dishes. Three Crabs has complexity and sweetness, but lacks salinity which makes it good for raw preparations. In the end I use only one brand: Tiparos. It is saltier than Vietnamese fish sauce, so I use less of it when making Vietnamese dishes or dipping sauces. It works fine for most Thai and Filipino dishes.

For oyster sauce I prefer the Thai Maekrua brand. It has a rich caramelized flavor that I think works much better in spicy dishes than the Chinese sauces. YMMV.

about 20 hours ago
JungMann in General Topics
1

Gazpacho question

Serious Eats has a terrific tutorial on gazpacho that calls for only fresh ingredients.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/08/ho...

about 20 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking

Uses for frozen ube/purple yam?

about 20 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking
2

Montreal Specifics

Trip recap:

* Baldwin Barmacie - Great atmosphere and ambiance. The bar had an apothecary look to it, though the theme did not really extend to the menu which focused on relatively easy cocktails. That is not to say it was all style over substance -- my Caesar was terrific and a Campari spritzer was fine -- but I perhaps expected more inventiveness for a bar that looks so serious about its craft.

* Bar Waverly - This was a great introduction to the neighborhood. The bar was light and airy with floor-to-ceiling windows and absolutely teeming during 5à7 with young neighborhood folks. Service was not exactly quick, but the friendliness of the servers made up for it.

* Dieu du Ciel - I love local breweries, and this one did not disappoint. But as much as I enjoyed the beers, I especially loved their cider (Cid Rosé). It was a good balance between sweet and dry without the yeasty flavors that some people find off-putting. The place was always full regardless of what time of day we showed up, but luckily we were staying only a few blocks away so it was always easy to come back later if we didn't feel like waiting.

* Cartel - We stopped by on our way to dinner at Leméac, but were informed after trying to pay for the beer we had on the terrasse that one could not drink without also having dinner. Luckily their fish tacos turned out to be expertly done. A perfect balance between crisp battered fish and silken avocado. My companion did not like her dish, but she may also have just been cross that we weren't told until the end that we needed to order dinner for the privilege of a cold beer on a humid night on the terrasse.

* Bagels - The hype is right. I would take a Fairmount bagel over a doughy, heavy NY bagel any day. I tried St. Viateur for comparison, but Fairmount's still wins. I have a dozen sesame and all-dressed in my freezer and will probably get another dozen brought over next week!

* TA Pies - My current avatar is actually an Australian meat pie -- so deep does my love go for these pastries. The ones on offer at TA Pies were some of the best; I might say even better than those at the Pie Face chain that has expanded from Australia to NYC.

* Monsieur B - The restaurant was nice enough and service was great, but the food was just okay. Our order of foie gras was not properly dressed and still had the veins and membrane attached. The lychee compote served on the side was mealy and inartfully cut into large chunks that threw the dish off balance. My companion, however, enjoyed her steak tartare and the fries served on the side were actually the best we had during our entire trip (and as tourists, we ate A LOT of fries with and without gravy). My fish with barbecue beef samosas sounded somewhat outmoded and confused, and indeed it was -- a filet in Asian-inspired sauce with two samosas at a distance and a streak of creme fraiche on the side of my plate. I'm still not sure what was meant to go with what, but luckily the individual pieces tasted fine though my fish was a tad overdone.

* Marché Jean Talon - I was very surprised to find myself ordering lumpia in French during my visit to the market. I was even more surprised that they were better than my grandmother's! But of course I should not have doubted the delightful surprises in store at the market. I stopped at Pâtisserie le Ryad for the recommended sweets and did notice the distinctive floral perfume to their baklava that I associate with North African cooking. My walnut ma'amoul tasted a bit stale, but in fairness, I didn't eat it until later in the day. Marché des Saveurs, though, was the highlight of the trip. I wanted to buy everything. I appreciated how they curated their local items, identifying maple syrup by region and they remain the only store where I could find cretons (which were delicious), along with their surprising selection of wapiti and game. Their potato donuts are also highly addictive. Marché des Saveurs is definitely on my list of go-to destinations for all subsequent trips to Montreal.

* Romado's - Clearly a popular place as there were no seats available for nearly two hours during our visit. I liked the chicken, I enjoyed the salad dressing, I loved the price after being sticker shocked by taxes all week, but I'm not so sure I get the attraction. There wasn't much seasoning to the chicken that would set it apart, or perhaps the spices had just been absorbed into the mountain of fries under which my order was buried. My companion, however, could not speak to me for the duration of our lunch because she was too busy swooning over her Portuguese chicken poutine. It ended up being her favorite dish of our entire trip.

*L'Gros Luxe - The 90-minute wait for a table was worth it for the epic L'Gros Caesar, garnished with grilled cheese, fried pickles, spring rolls, onion rings and a burger. While the drink itself was not great, the garnishes were all very good and made for a good value meal. This was, in the end, a good Quebec interpretation of hipster cuisine. Poutine with tater tots? Yes please! The avocado fries with a honey-Sriracha aioli were also quite good.

* Trip de Bouffe - We went just prior to closing so the food we ordered did not taste very fresh. That being said, their kibbeh was expertly-made with thin walls encasing a generous filling of meat, onions and almonds. The slight kick in their spice blend was a nice surprise. The sfiha and sambousek were a little too doughy but were still satisfying. If I lived in Plateau, I could easily see myself eating at this inexpensive spot several times a week.

* Beautys Restaurant - I was told this was a Montreal institution and I had to get their signature Mish-Mash. I was not disappointed. Classic diner food in an old school setting, complete with gruff, old owner sitting on a stool in guard of the door. The home fries were also very good with some good crunch and caramelized bits.

There were several other places we had meant to visit but we did not realize that so many businesses would be closed at the end of July. Suffice it to say we had never heard of a "construction holiday" before and none of the restaurant websites we visited made any announcement that they were closing for an extended period. Luckily all the requisite poutine and smoked meat places were open so I suppose we'll just have to visit again once vacation season ends to enjoy your more off-the-beaten-path recommendations. Thanks again for all your hospitality and help, Montreal.

about 22 hours ago
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)
5

Sour/Tart Cherries - where to find them in Manhattan

The sour cherry season was especially short this year due to the late frost. The last weekend for cherries at Union Square was two or three weeks ago. If you are staying on the Upper East Side, you can get jarred sour cherries at the Pioneer Market on 92nd and Lexington. Kalystyan's carries frozen sour cherries.

2 days ago
JungMann in Manhattan

Montreal Specifics

Thanks. The two who introduced me to Quebecois cuisine were both born in New England to French Canadian parents, but weren't really cooks themselves so it took a lot of research for me to find a foolproof tourtière recipe. Then it was another shot in the dark to find the condiments for tourtière. Still working on my cretons and am looking forward to tasting some while visiting. I will now be staying in the Plateau very close to Boucherie Lawrence so I think there's also cotecchino in my future.

Jul 23, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

If we end up watching the fireworks on Saturday from Kondiaronk Belvedere, I will certainly try to explore another picnic location than Mont-Royal.

Our other option for fireworks (unless anybody knows better vantage points) is the Village Éphémère but it seems rather a dead zone for things to do later. I know of the terrasses near the Old Port, but I fear the area is a bit more buttoned up than we want for Saturday night.

Jul 23, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

Prima, thanks so much for the recommendations! A late night prix-fixe like Lemeac sounds perfect for our first night since I imagine we will be wandering our neighborhood and eating late. Do you know of any places closer to our new HQ in Plateau near rue St-Denis and avenue Laurier E?

Jul 23, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Mission Chinese pop-up

It sounds like you had a similar experience to my dinner in May. I didn't mention the lack of heat because everyone's spice tolerance is different, but yeah, none of the food was anywhere near the mala explosion I had heard about.

The pork belly you had does sound good, though. Was it the same as Filipino lechon kawali?

Jul 22, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

Gateway Foods(dishes) to introduce foreign / ethnic flavours

I like to serve easy home-cooked dinners when I'm introducing a new cuisine. Something, were my guests so enamored by new and exciting flavors, that they could make at home. For South Asian it's either tandoori chicken (oven baked chicken marinated in yogurt) or qeema matar (ground beef curry) with a sabzi (vegetable side) and roti (flatbreads). Another friend of mine goes with dal (lentil soup) and rice. Whatever the choice, each of these recipes is homey and easy to make: the perfect gateway for aspiring cooks.

Jul 22, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

Martin Brand Longanisa

You can boil them in a small amount of water in an uncovered pot. They give off quite a bit of fat so once the water boils off you can finish them with a quick fry but be sure to watch the pan as the drippings tend to caramelize quickly.

They make a great filling for a banh mi style sandwich or I'll have them like a hot dog served with green papaya relish. I've also used them to make Scotch eggs, fried rice, spaghetti sauce and even a take on Chinese noodles with candied cashews and scallions. They're pretty versatile: a little salty, a little sweet.

Jul 21, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Chow-worthy takeout before hopping on Acela home

Woorijip, E-mo or Food Gallery are my usual go-to before a trip out of Penn Station. The tuna kimbap at Woorijip is my typical order since it holds well and is usually a little more substantial than the beef kimbap there.

Jul 18, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

For those who love offals, which are your favorite?

I always thought brain has a creamy flavor, somewhere between sweetbreads and a very rich egg. I like them in a very fiery Pakistani dish where they are cooked until they have the consistency of scrambled eggs.

Jul 17, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
2

Montreal Specifics

Thanks for the detailed response!

I shop at the Middle Eastern grocers in New York so I'm not sure Adonis is on the radar unless their bakery is very good. I have a weak spot for good ma'amoul.

With respect to the cocktail scene, I am not so much looking to be blown away as I am in search of a place that attracts a broadly local crowd. A Montrealer recommended Big in Japan and Barraca where I might find myself in a mostly hipster crowd, but it will still be a Montrealais experience because they'll expect me to speak French.

On Quebecois food, I realize it is a rapidly evolving cuisine, but we are only beginning to discover the classics in New York. I fell in love with my first tourtière. I am craving cretons. The soupe aux pois, well that I'm not craving as much this summer, but I'll try some if it's good! I guess La Binerie it is.

I am not staying in Hochelaga-Maisonneuve anymore, but I have to ask, what is nude breakfast? I'd do a web search, but I'm at a work computer and I'm afraid what would come up...

Jul 17, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

Prima, you do know how to tempt me. Damas is exactly the kind of place I would love to visit, but it is out of our price range. Do you have any other recommendations for good Syrian at a gentler price point?

The issue with Joe Beef and APDC is not simply the cost, but also, I don't think we will want to eat so indulgently at the end of our holiday. I thought about sharing small plates at Maison Publique, but nothing on the current menu really calls out to me.

Jul 17, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Pickled Seasonal Vegetables: Home Cooking Dish of the Month for June 2014

Gretchen, I made the David Lebovitz recipe and yup, they're great after about a week in the brine.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Montreal Specifics

Good to know! Thanks.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

Merci, lagatta. It looks like I'm either staying in Ho-Ma or near Promenade Masson. We're trying to make the decision now if you have any opinions on the areas.

I will certainly take your advice and visit le Marchée des Saveurs. Are QC ciders dry like the French and Spanish varieties or do they tend to the sweet side like US/British cider?

I knew the SAQ had a monopoly on alcohol sales, but I assumed we could get wine or at least beer at the dépanneur to bring to the park. So long as we can still get decent wine in the $15-20 range, I'm not too worried.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

We're stopping by Trip de Bouffe before we head to Mont-Royal so we'll have food. NYC does not have many options for sfiha, sambousek or manakish so I'm actually rather looking forward to this place.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

Montreal Specifics

New Yorker planning my first trip to Montreal next week. I've read through many of the threads here and have a running list of your recommendations but need help tailoring my experience. We'll be around Plateau, Mile End, Petite Italie and perhaps Saint-Henri and Ho-Ma.
1) Casual Middle Eastern – I know Saint-Laurent has good boucheries and bakeries, but are there other neighborhoods or specific restaurants worth visiting for Syrian or Lebanese? I know there is also North African in Plateau and will try to visit La Khaima. Is shish taouk in MTL really that good? (FWIW I grew up on Middle Eastern and cook it at home)

2) 5@7 - Are there any good spots I should check out on Thursday or Friday near Plateau or worth traveling for to be near young nightlife or restaurants? Suwu, Baldwin Barmacie, Le Lab and Baracca caught my eye and though we love our cocktails in New York if Montreal is more of a beer town, I’d love recommendations for good Quebec beers.

3) Brunch - Brunch is a big, boozy tradition in New York. Is it the same in Montreal? Any good spots to check out near Notre Dame Basilica? Or just some place with great Caesars?

4) Quebecois food - I know of La Binerie Mont-Royal. Are there any better options? I'm also looking for cretons to bring back home if there is a shop or brand I should be looking for.

5) Jean Talon & Atwater – Do the vendors rotate depending on day or can I expect the market to be the same regardless if I go on a Friday afternoon or a Sunday morning?

6) Nice lunch - I have Le Quartier Général or État-Major down depending on whether we stay in Plateau or Ho-Ma. Are there other restaurants we ought to consider around this price point?

7) Nice dinner – I’m traveling with adventurous diners, but Joe Beef/Au Pied de Cochon may be out of their league. We’re looking a nice Sunday supper under $40pp + tax + tip. We are open to cuisine, but BYO would be a nice perk.

8) Picnics – If we want to picnic on Mont-Royal, do we have to sit at a picnic table in order to open our wine? NY doesn’t really have picnic tables in our parks and we’re not allowed to open wine in public either way.

Thank you all in advance.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Quebec (inc. Montreal)

OK..SO I HAVE A BAGEL...WHAT DO YOU PUT ON YOURS?

I'm pretty traditional with my bagels. Everything with cream cheese, onion, caper and either nova or old school lox.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

Sunday brunch like The Publican in Chicago

Try the Cleveland. You could also sort of split the difference between dim sum and brunch at Ma Peche.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

Mission Chinese pop-up

I never had the chance to visit Mission Chinese when it was on the LES, so i can't compare the two restaurants. Mapo tofu is usually an oil slick, but I've had versions I like more than at the popup.

Jul 16, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

ISO recipe for herbed ricotta filling for zucchini blossoms and questions

I use ricotta mixed with egg, parmesan, mozzarella, parsley, mint and chile flakes.

I use a combination of rice and AP flour for the batter. Not sure if my recipe is authentic to Sorrento, but it works fine for me.

Jul 15, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Mission Chinese pop-up

I went to the Mission Chinese pop-up a few weeks ago. The lines for non-ticket holders aren't bad and service is extremely efficient so you won't wait long. In all I think there are 8 dishes to the prix-fixe. Our visit included a congee, salt cod fried rice, a pickle platter, seasonal greens (kangkong in our case), red cabbage slaw, chicken wings, mapo tofu and kung pao pastrami. The congee and fried rice were terrific. I liked the flavor of the wings and the greens with smoked oyster sauce, but thought the execution was a little silly (they served us 8-inch leaves in a steamer basket -- to eat with our fingers?). The mapo tofu and kung pao pastrami were aggressively salty and greasy in a way that might excite a writer at Thrillist but once you get past the novelty of a cultural mashup with a Paula Deen-like regard for nutritional values, they are more circus than bread.

There is a cash bar you can walk up to for an aperitif or beer/wine as well as outdoor seating when it's nice out.

Jul 15, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan
1

Costco Lamb Leg

They're liquid absorbers. Much like in a bag of chicken. Enjoy your lamb and feel free to toss that out.

Jul 14, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

What's for Dinner #311 - the Relax, Kick Back, and Enjoy Summer Edition [through July 11, 2014]

Where do you pinch your basil to get them bushy? I keep pinching the tops of side shoots and pulling off the big leaves on the bottom but somehow my basil still finds a way to grow up and not out.

Jul 12, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Famous Regional Food you find embarrassing or disgusting?

I always considered baby back ribs to be its own thing. A safe bet at an old-school neighborhood restaurant like Gale Street Inn or the ubiquitous Greek dinner. I had to look up whether Carson's even advertised itself as a barbecue spot.

Because if it's barbecue I want -- I'm not heading to Carson's or a restaurant with 30 different items on the menu. I'm heading to some hole in the wall that sells your choice of ribs, tips, links or a combo and serves up your order in a Styrofoam box with fries and a slice of white bread. Rib tips were always the stand out item to order. I always think of home on the rare occasion I see them for sale outside Chicagoland.

Jul 11, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
1

Famous Regional Food you find embarrassing or disgusting?

"Now that's a sensible young man who walks to the left and stands to the right on escalators, maintains a steady walking pace appropriate to his age and knows better than to stop in the middle of a busy sidewalk just to look around."

Jul 10, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
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