JungMann's Profile

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Thai basil?

Thai basil is horapa. Holy basil is krapow. Either variety is at home in pad kee mao.

about 23 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking
1

Far-away Chains on your "To Do" List

Nostalgia dipped in Chick-Fil-A sauce. :) I also crossed Wawa off my to-do list while I was out there.

about 23 hours ago
JungMann in Chains

Far-away Chains on your "To Do" List

Hey, I just drove 100 miles for CFA (and a cheesesteak). The heart wants what the heart wants.

1 day ago
JungMann in Chains
1

What's for Dinner #326 - The Fall Pursuits Edition

That is definitely one of my go-to recipes for bone-in, skin-on thighs, but I tried a Bobby Flay recipe for spice crusted chicken thigh last week that was just as easy and vies for first place in my book.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/10...

Za'atar

Lebanese za'atar almost always contains some sumac, although you can buy a "green" za'atar mixture that is mostly herb and sesame. Jordanian za'atar typically uses more sumac than Lebanese, to the point that it sometimes appears red.

1 day ago
JungMann in Home Cooking

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Fortune cookies might be an American invention, but I still saw a ton of them at the Mandarin-speaking Chinese bakery where I bought my mooncakes this year.

Sep 15, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
1

Apple-themed potluck

Baked brie en croute with apple compote or just sliced apples is always a crowd pleaser. Chicken salad or smoked trout with diced apples are also a good filling for endive cups.

Sep 15, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Za'atar

Store your bottle in the spice cabinet. Mix it with some olive oil and use it as a bread dip. Sprinkle a bit on your grilled cheese or mix into a savory yogurt. Toss a tomato and mozzarella salad with a za'atar and lemon vinaigrette.

Some people also like to use it as a spice rub for chicken or lamb. I've never tried that myself, but it could be tasty.

Sep 15, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

Crab rangoon on the East Coast (and in the Midwest) is usually made from surimi and cream cheese. When I make them at home I also add scallions, garlic powder, soy sauce and sesame oil to the filling. On the rare occasions I've had crab rangoon made with real crab meat, they haven't been nearly as satisfying. Real crab has a delicacy that is quickly overwhelmed by the cream cheese filling. Surimi, however, has a sweet intensity that works magic here.

Sep 15, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
1

What's for Dinner #326 - The Fall Pursuits Edition

Diolch yn fawr, Mr. H.

Sep 15, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What kind of vinegars do you keep on hand?

I use black vinegar. It lends Chinese dishes a characteristic smoky, sweet fragrance along with a mild tang. Koon Chun is one of the more popular brands and it looks like you can buy it online. I use Kong Yen which also shows up in Google Shopping.

Sep 14, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What kind of vinegars do you keep on hand?

I find palm vinegar tastes much more acidic than apple cider vinegar. I use apple cider or cane vinegar for adobo but palm vinegar I use for sawsawan or curing fish/meat for kinilaw.

Sep 14, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #326 - The Fall Pursuits Edition

I went on a long drive to Pennsylvania and somehow ended up in Wales. At least that's the impression I got judging by the unbroken string of consonants on every street sign. So I left Bala Cwynyd with leeks on my mind...

But then this cozy sweater sort of day got me feeling lazy. So I took the easy way out by making my favorite boiled dinner: cocido. It's one of those things that is dead simple, but still more than the sum of its parts. While I got to the hard work of clearing out my DVR, I left a stock pot to bubble over with the heady aroma of chorizo, morcilla, beef shins, soup bones, pork trotters, ham hocks, bacon and chicken with a clove-studded onion and head of garlic lazily bobbing in the warm waters. A couple hours later, I got up to add chickpeas, cabbage, carrots and the leeks that had been calling to me and there you have it: a three-course dinner. The collagen-rich broth makes a soup that puts ramen to shame when served with angel hair noodles. To serve the vegetables, I tossed the chickpeas with diced bone marrow from the soup bones to reinforce their creamy flavor while the meat was accompanied by a tomato and sherry vinegar relish along with garlic chutney.

What's for Dinner #326 - The Fall Pursuits Edition

Your aroosa sounds like what I call arayes. They're one of my standbys for cocktail parties since I can just pop them in the oven to cook or stay warm while I mingle.

Sep 14, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking
1

The great noodle soups of the world roundup

Where so you recommend a good bowl? I'll be your way in a month.

Sep 12, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

The great noodle soups of the world roundup

Pancit mami
La Paz batchoy
Khao soi

Sep 12, 2014
JungMann in General Topics
1

Tamales

I've tried the vendors outside Our Lady of Guadalupe. Pretty good, but I am a much bigger fan of the numerous tamaleros on East 116th Street on Sunday mornings. There is a vendor on the south side of 116th east of 3rd that sells terrific chicken tamales with salsa verde while her competition across the street sells several regional varieties of tamales including Oaxaqueño, dulce and mole.

Sep 12, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

Tamales

Your best bet within those boundaries will be Tulcingo del Valle, but that said, Midtown and Chelsea are not exactly teeming with tamalerias.

Sep 11, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

What's for dinner #325 - The Transition to Autumn Edition [through September 12, 2014]

No wonder you're a professional! Whenever I entertain notions of opening a restaurant as my next career, I watch Chopped and realize I would just be yelling WTF during any of those challenges. Thankfully the network censors would likely edit that out so it shouldn't hurt my restaurant much.

PIg and Khao is AWESOME

Are fried oysters off menu now? I didn't see them, though I wasn't a fan when I first had them a couple years ago. But everything else we had suggested she has hit her stride since my last visit last year. Shan noodles were spicy and aromatic. Ribs are a bit dry, but that sauce is bone licking good especially with her spot on slaw. Now just need to get that cast iron pan hot enough to actually crisp the sisig at the table and I am a happy camper. If she made a dinuguan as sharp and assertive as the other saucy dishes I might just move in.

Sep 09, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Family Dinner  

The authors explicitly questioned the value of cooking in their conclusion. They go so far as to suggest that maybe we shouldn't be asking mothers to put in all this work. Why not have school cafeterias cater dinner instead? Because we know how popular the school lunch program has proven to be with picky children.

Reading the study I just find myself asking do these academics have any real life experience? They rely on an extreme definition of home cooking as "elaborate" dinners made from "scratch" to then observe that being poor makes it nearly impossible to enact this foodie ideal. But common sense tells us this ideal is not the lived experience for the average mother, nor even the mother living in a motel room with only a microwave and two plastic spoons. Only by using an extreme definition of cooking as the baseline standard can the authors then suggest that home cooking is problematic. Otherwise we would just have an observational study that comes to the conclusion that cooking is a whole lot of work, requires tradeoffs and resource management. Basically like much of adult life.

Where to buy harissa?

That brand doesn't really share much in common with North African harissa other than the fact that it is made of pureed peppers. The other brand of harissa my WF carries, Cava, is even further afield. It's delicious, but it's more of spicy sundried tomato spread.

Sep 09, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Family Dinner  

If Amanda Marcotte's article delved honestly into the hardships faced by working families, we'd be having a different conversation. Instead she made sweeping generalizations about family life, the value of family dinners and the systemic oppression of women based on a small sample of families facing worst-case circumstances. Fussy children, small kitchens, pests and dull knives make cooking an impossible chore? Tell that to almost *anyone* in human history who prepared food before the settlement of 21st-century Brooklyn. Her breezy shock at the ordinary facts of human existence are what seemingly untether her observations from reality. That she cloaks herself in the protective mantle of victimhood when people react to this thin gruel of hyperbole just adds to the obnoxiousness of it all.

If we were actually concerned with addressing the conditions faced by the working poor, we might be talking about the breakdown of the family, the outsourcing of labor and the economic conditions that erect impediments to the basic necessities of life. Instead we have an ideologically-driven study which equates family dinner with "elaborate meals cooked from scratch," "a foodie-version of a homecooked meal" made with "expensive" ingredients and "whole grains." Well of course it's going to be difficult for working families to meet those standards. I can't even meet those standards and I actually enjoy cooking. But that doesn't mean family dinner is an anachronistic tradition that has become a tool of oppression. It means we need common sense solutions to make healthy dinners at home easy, desirable and accessible.

want to know Chinese style of making aubergines? Help

There are many ways to cook eggplant so it's hard to make an appropriate recommendation without knowing your friend's preferences. For what it's worth, my personal favorite is fish fragrant eggplant and Fuchsia Dunlop comes to the rescue with a recipe.
http://andrewzimmern.com/2013/03/28/f...

Sep 09, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Where to buy harissa?

Have you tried checking in at a halal butcher? They usually stock at least a few groceries with cans and tubes of harissa stocked near the fava beans, sardines and other shelf stable products. Looking at the webpage for Aladdin Market, I would think they are bound to have it there.

Amazon also carries Dea and Phare du bon cap, two of the most common harissa brands in Middle Eastern stores. Phare du bon cap is the better of the two. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_nos...

Sep 09, 2014
JungMann in General Topics

The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Family Dinner  

Sep 08, 2014
JungMann in Food Media & News

The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Family Dinner  

I actually expected a different response, as did Amanda Marcotte. Her latest filing for Slate doubles down on her attack on dinner, complaining that her observation that family dinner is a hard, expensive waste of time should have been unremarkable. She is frankly "stunned" by the backlash, which she ascribes to anti-feminist conservatives. She apparently cannot see why her hyperbolic statements have generated such an exaggerated response since she goes on to complain that she feels victimized by her detractors, comparing them to cyberbullies and ominously warning that such reader response can lead to authors developing PTSD.

What's for dinner #325 - The Transition to Autumn Edition [through September 12, 2014]

Last Saturday was a scorcher so I picked up some farm fresh corn to turn into chowder tonight. Of course it's also now about 20 degrees Fahrenheit cooler so I'll make a main of Szechuan beef and celery to serve over shirataki tofu noodles. I'll follow up our spicy mains with a sweet and tart peach and buttermilk ice cream for dessert.

The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Family Dinner  

There's been a lot of smart commentary responding to Amanda Marcotte's broadside against the oppressive construct that is a homemade family dinner. But for those who want the unadulterated piece, here is Marcotte making the argument that making dinner is so hard and stressful for working women that it's basically not worth it.

Sep 08, 2014
JungMann in Food Media & News

What's for Dinner #324 - School's Back in Session Edition [through September 7, 2014]

Jealous! I met my Taiwanese friend in New York's Chinatown this afternoon to for the mooncake festival and dim sum at Nom Wah Parlor. But after eating a mooncake each along with an additional snow skin mooncake for her and an old husband cookie for me, we had to nix dinner.

Sep 07, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking