JungMann's Profile

Title Last Reply

Al Bustan

Pan is right. The differences between the Levant and Yemen are vast. Even the Arabic they speak is different. The seasonings, too, are a stark contrast: direct trade routes with India have led to Yemen developing a spicier (both in heat and intricacy) cuisine than Arabs in the Levant. Just compare the Levantine staple of baharat to Yemeni hawaij and you clearly taste the difference. While the two regions do share common staple crops, they are prepared differently.

The Yemeni impact on Israeli cuisine is unique in the Levant because of the large population of Yemenite Jews, a population not found in other parts of the region. There is not as much crossfertilization between these countries as you imply unless you've also been noticing some Ashkenazi treats in Beirut nowadays.

about 7 hours ago
JungMann in Manhattan

Thanksgiving/Festive Recipe for CostCo Boneless Leg of Lamb?

Cooking flat will cook the thinner parts of the lamb to well done while the thicker parts of the lamb remain medium rare. Rolling and tying the leg allows you to uniformly shape the lamb and cook to the desired temperature. If you have dinner guests who like their meat at various shades of doneness, then cook flat. If you want to serve your lamb at an exact 135 degrees, tie it.

about 7 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking

Thanksgiving/Festive Recipe for CostCo Boneless Leg of Lamb?

Have you opened the Costco package? The legs usually have a serious fat cap. It just may be hiding beneath the labeling. As for recipes, this North African-inspired spice rub from Epicurious is one of the most flavorful preparations I've come across. http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

about 18 hours ago
JungMann in Home Cooking
1

What are your 3 favorite cuisines to cook other than your own?

Cajun, Chinese and Thai. All three tend to be quick to get to the table and even the mistakes are delicious.

1 day ago
JungMann in General Topics

Al Bustan

The interior is a step up from the average Lebanese restaurant and the place is dripping with Lebanese hospitality. You get a warm welcome when you come in and they do make you feel like an honor guest. The kitchen is happy to accommodate special requests. The wait staff just needs to come round more often.

1 day ago
JungMann in Manhattan

2nd entree that would compliment lamb (also 7hr lamb - leg or shoulder)?

I was also going to recommend an eggplant-based alternative. Lamb and eggplant are a greater pairing than steak and red wine.

Al Bustan

It's one of the better Lebanese restaurants in the borough, though there is better in Brooklyn and New Jersey. Service is slow as Simon notes. It would not be my choice if I were limited to one dinner in NYC.

Nov 20, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

Chowhound lunch at Zabb Elee in Queens

I haven't been to Kababish, but I'm a big fan of gola kabab. I'll check them out next time I head out there.

Nov 18, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

Baking Lamb Patties (need advice on cooking time)

Traditionally this type of kibbeh is shaped like a football. If you're doing patties, try baking at 400 degrees for 30-40 minutes. Unless your patties are slider-sized, I don't think they'd be done in 25 minutes.

Nov 17, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What type of cuisine do you NOT like?

I'm going to have to call BS on this one. Simplicity and blandness don't invalidate a food culture. It wasn't long ago that the food world celebrated the simplicity and unrefined seasoning of cucina povera and yet no one questions whether Tuscany lacks a food culture. If we follow the full logic of your posting, then the simplicity and reliance on "unorthodox" foodstuffs the characterizes Cantonese cuisine would invalidate its place in the Chinese canon. It might be one of the "dreadful" cuisines you dislike, but it's still a cuisine.

As is Filipino. Again following your logic, if social stratification leads to the development of a defined food culture, it's hard to deny the legacy of 500 years of Spanish occupation in the Philippines. There is a whole roster of intricately prepared, full-flavored dishes that fuse Spanish technique with Southeast Asian flavors: relleno, mechado, pochero, with nary an organ meat to be seen. I'll give you there are a lot of very bland dishes out there and the carinderias and turo-turo joints that feed the largely poor population on a centavo have dragged down the quality of Filipino dining culture, but it is still a distinct culture, with a fascinating and oftentimes delicious history.

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

Now that Lindawhit has officially opened paprikash season, that's all I've been able to think about. Since I have pork chops on hand, I made a similar dish of Szegediner goulash using a jar of sauerkraut I put up some time last November. I wasn't quite sure how year-old sauerkraut would be, its color had darkened considerably, but once I opened the jar, it tasted fantastic. Skipped the sour cream and used whole milk labneh instead for a fully fermented dinner.

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

Best I can tell she rolled out bread dough and topped it with olive oil, anchovy fillets, crushed garlic and red pepper flakes before rolling it into a loaf and baking it. In the end it looked similar to the bread in the link below, only in loaf form. She also made a version with a lightly seasoned spinach filling that was equally delicious.
http://www.abreadaday.com/?p=2249

Nov 17, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking
1

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

I've been drinking old fashioneds with Jamaican bitters lately, so the Negroni was nice change of pace. The glaze was something I had left over from making candied bacon. Because I was working with something that was already pretty salty, I used shiro miso for my recipe, but a saltier miso like yours would be great, if not better, with vegetables or unseasoned meat. You could also make a miso butter for steak or vegetables if you want to cut out the sugars.

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

I spent the past few days at a hunting cabin in the country so one might expect some pretty spartan dinners, but my companion's Italian mother would not see us go hungry and packed us delicious meals of veal scallopine, potatoes stuffed with minced pork and garlic and, my new favorite Italian food, anchovy bread. Traveling with these folks is always a lesson in delicious.

I got home rather late tonight so a quick fridge scrounge was in order if I was to get dinner on the table before "Homeland." There was rabbit pie with tarragon and ice cider gravy, roasted napa cabbage with bacon and maple-miso glaze and a delicious New York farmhouse cider to wash it all down. And I even had an extra 15 minutes for me to prepare a Negroni to get me through the stress of Claire Danes' latest CIA operation.

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

I'd love your recipe for lamb's brains. My father did a great version that we enjoyed pretty regularly when I was growing up, but even with my frequent requests for a recipe, he still won't give up the goods.

Nov 14, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

Continuing to clear out the freezer so I can fill it right back up again for the holidays. Tonight we had lima beans, a bag of spinach and lamb loin chops to use up. Lamb went into a marinade of lemon juice, soy sauce, rosemary and garlic whilst I got to work on the vegetables. Spinach was cooked with sauteed onions, scallions, the juice of half a lemon, sumac and a bit of baharat for seasoning. The lima beans I sauteed with garlic in butter perfumed with turmeric, dill and saffron. A fresh hit of chopped dill and Aleppo pepper to finish. While the vegetables cooled, I finished up the lamb in a cast iron pan and about 15 minutes later, another quick weeknight dinner is served.

What's for Dinner #334 - the Veteran's Day Edition [Through November 17, 2014]

You think those leaves are bad? Try cleaning up gingko fruit. I accidentally knelt on some while cleaning up leaves and had to drive to the cleaners with all my windows open.

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

I just heat up the cauliflower in a non-stick pan until all the moisture is gone. I previously froze them so they don't need to be parcooked as freezing has already tenderized the grains.

Nov 10, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

Cauliflower rice is quickly becoming my favorite discovery from the WFD threads. I've found that the bit of caramelization that results from sauteeing the rice in a dry pan is a perfect match with the subtle sweetness of Japanese donburi. Tonight's otherwise plain Jane dinner of garlic chives cooked with eggs, soy sauce and sesame oil was absolute comfort in a bowl with the cauliflower rice. So much so, I think I may end up making seconds.

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

The Mike Ditka beefs were pretty tasty, but dessert ended up being crow.

Nov 09, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

Sunday night football. Mike Ditka. Italian beefs. Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose.

In honor of tonight's Bears v Packers game, we have a Chicago specialty of Italian beef on the menu. I happened upon Mike Ditka brand in the store and thought it might bring us some luck, particularly after the walloping the Bears got the last time they played the Packers. There will be French fries cooked in tallow and broccoli rabe for our sides, and a big helping of victory for dessert!

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

Just finished an umami-rich dinner of fish in black bean and garlic tomato sauce. It's a piquant sauce that is fantastic with oily fish, in tonight's instance, milkfish. On the side there was cauliflower rice and fresh napa kimchi with green apples. Carbs saved, I may splurge on a Rob Roy as I sink into the couch for a quiet night in.

Chowhound lunch at Zabb Elee in Queens

I don't usually stick around long enough for a sit-down lunch. I generally pick up something quick and head back to the office. That means I stick to casual and fast fare: Ihawan for Filipino barbecue, Fiesta Grill for goat stew. Coatzingo for tortas and cemitas, Kabab King or Tawa Foods for Pakistani and Mama's Empanadas for empanadas. None of these are places I'd sit down at, but they are some of the better and more unique lunches I can get within 30 minutes of work.

Nov 07, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan
1

Chowhound lunch at Zabb Elee in Queens

I get lunch in Woodside/Jackson Heights all the time. One of the perks of working off the Lexington/53rd E. But I'd suggest calling Zabb Elee ahead of time depending on the size of your group. It's not very big.

Nov 07, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

DH has good taste. Given New York's status as a culinary capital, it's a crying shame there's only one restaurant here that serves up this bowl of Americana. And not particularly well, though their fish bowl cocktails are pretty killer!

Nov 06, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

Finally! The last day of rotisserie chicken! I used the carcass to make stock along with chicken feet for extra body. And now I have a Costco-sized vat of chicken stock. It never ends...

For this evening's rainy night dinner, I used part of the stock to make a childhood favorite of pancit mami. Normally pancit noodles are stir fried, but to make mami, egg noodles are served in broth with sliced chicken, napa cabbage, carrots, hard-boiled egg and a scatter of crisp fried garlic and scallions. I can't remember the last time I had a bowl, but however long it has been is too long. Between the soft wisps of napa leaf and the crunchy garlic melting into the steamy soup, it's a tumult of textures that make ramen seem absolutely boring by comparison. And those last sips at the end, the soup now sweetened by the carrots and rich with egg yolk, go down smooth as a single malt on a cold, rainy night. Pinoy penicillin right in a bowl.

Traditional North India / Punjabi

I haven't been to Moti Mahal yet, but I've only heard good things from those who've gone. For what it is worth, my family in the subcontinent loves the Moti Mahal brand so your guests should be quite familiar with the restaurant.

Nov 05, 2014
JungMann in Manhattan

What's for Dinner #333 - The end of Daylight Savings Time Edition [through Nov. 10, 2014]

I bought a Costco rotisserie chicken on my way back from a long trip thinking chicken with bread sauce would be a quick and comforting dinner for my first night back home. I did, however, neglect to consider that Costco chicken, being bred with T-Rex genes, are better sized for suburban families than urban singles. So this week is all about what to do with rotisserie chicken. With all the attention paid to Georgia and Virginia this time of year, it's unsurprising that the first recipe to come to mind was Brunswick stew, a dish claimed by both states as their own. Now I can't say if the folks in Old Dominion would take kindly to my addition of Sriracha; neither would you be apt to find Yellow Jackets tailgating with smoked paprika in their backseat. But a smokey and hot note is perfect with the sweet tomato and barbecue sauce base that makes up the backbone of the stew along with lima beans, corn and shredded chicken. And like most stews, the flavors are even better after taking a night to mingle in the fridge. Better than you'd expect after 3 days of rotisserie chicken anyway.

CHICKEN CURRY! Home Cooking Dish of the Month (November 2014)

Kyleoh, candlenuts are an ingredient I have a hard time finding locally. Can I substitute cashews? I'd go with your suggestion of using macadamia nuts, but I'd be hard pressed to use up the rest of the large and expensive can within the year.

Nov 05, 2014
JungMann in Home Cooking

Why drink chicken soup when you are sick? What so special?

Chicken is one of the most easily accessible proteins in the West. I'd venture to guess this is one of the major chicken soup has become a popular home remedy for colds and flu: an old hen past its laying days could easily be dispatched by the family and stewed to provide nutritious food for someone who is ill.

I didn't grow up with chicken soup, so I don't crave it when I'm sick. I'll admittedly make chicken and rice congee if I have an upset stomach, but mainly because the rice and ginger are soothing. For the winter sniffles, I usually opt for a hot and sour soup made with green tamarind, pork ribs, leafy greens and Sriracha.

Nov 05, 2014
JungMann in General Topics