s

SkipII's Profile

Title Last Reply

Scraper that Michael Symon uses

Michael Symon on Cooking Channel uses a white, flexible plastic scraper to scoop up his chopped engredients from his cutting board. I can't find anything like it anywhere.

Any ideas?

Dec 23, 2012
SkipII in Cookware

Chili Vertigo

Thanks. Both of these responses help.
I live in the Midwest, so the actual names of the chiles may be a little butchered by the time they get here.

Mar 20, 2011
SkipII in Home Cooking

Chili Vertigo

No, not a new recipe. I just find myself dizzy and disoriented when it comes to understanding chilies. I see recipes that call for "chilies" or "hot chilies" or, even worse, some chili that has five different names depending on what region you are in.

Point is, I really want to learn how to use chilies in recipes, but I first have to get some basics down. Even when I have looked at cookbooks or those large poster you see sometimes, I can rarely equate what I read there with that I see at the local grocers.

Does anyone know of a reference that might help? Or if someone would be be so kind to offer their Dummies Guide to Chilies here, that would be great.

Thanks.

Mar 19, 2011
SkipII in Home Cooking

Trouble sharpening Henckels knives

I contacted Bob and will probably go that route. By the way, I mentioned the rolled (convex) edge and he did not seem to know what I was talking about. Maybe that is not his technique? Anyway, he seems to have great references, so I'll go that route for now and use a ceramic steel. Still disappointed I could not get a good edge on these knives, since I was always able to do so before. Maybe I'll find out something after Bob works on them.

Dec 11, 2010
SkipII in Cookware

Trouble sharpening Henckels knives

Thanks, but I have not sharpened them that much. If that was the case, the blade would be below the bolster.

Dec 11, 2010
SkipII in Cookware

Trouble sharpening Henckels knives

Not sure what you mean. "Thinned?" And by "behind the primary" do you mean the secondary bevel or the flat of the blade. I can't imagine the latter has an effect.

I have tried primary bevel only (which is what most home sharpeners and shop sharpening is), but also done primary/secondary bevel.

Dec 11, 2010
SkipII in Cookware

Trouble sharpening Henckels knives

Sorry, Four Star. I must be prone to exaggeration.

Dec 11, 2010
SkipII in Cookware

Trouble sharpening Henckels knives

I have a full set of Henckels (mostly five-star). They are 20-25 years old with light daily use.

I simply cannot get and keep an edge on them all of a sudden, even using the techniques I have always used. I am an advanced hobbyist woodworker and can put an edge on a plane blade that allows me to make a wood shaving I can see through. I have a full set of oil and water stones. I have even paid (ughhh) to have the knives sharpened -- and within a day or two: dead.

My regular routine is to set a primary edge of about 20 degrees and a compound edge of 25-30 degrees. The knives are finished off with a 6000 grit Japanese water stone.

I use a bamboo cutting board. The knives have never seen the inside of a dishwasher.

So....I hear from Williams and Sonoma that knives this old can lose their ability to hold an edge. I'm not sure I buy that, but my experience has me spooked.

Anyone else experience this?

Dec 11, 2010
SkipII in Cookware

All kinds of problems - newbie at home pizza dough

Thanks for the help. I'll regroup!

Sep 12, 2010
SkipII in Home Cooking

All kinds of problems - newbie at home pizza dough

I used Tony Gemignani method but could not seem to get it right. He uses a first and palm. I think the back of palm (rolled into a C) sounds better to me. I was throwing the dough all over the floor. Thank goodness the floor was clean. :=)

Sep 12, 2010
SkipII in Home Cooking

All kinds of problems - newbie at home pizza dough

Pizza recipe is Peter Reinhart's

The original dough rested plenty -- overnight at first then another two hours on the counter after I stretched them out a bit. The problem may be that I messed up tossing most of them and rolled them back in a ball and started over. Maybe I need to let them site again for an hour?

Sep 12, 2010
SkipII in Home Cooking

All kinds of problems - newbie at home pizza dough

Help!!

1. I can't get my dough to stretch out much from its ball. It keeps shrinking back.

2. When I toss it, I inevitably tear out the middle well before it takes shape.

3. I do not have the toss down right either. Fist? Open palm, both?

Thanks!

Sep 12, 2010
SkipII in Home Cooking

How to "ripple" homemade lasagna noodles

I've got the noodle part down, but how do I get that rippled edge?

I can see it coming: there probably is a lasagna rippling toolk you can buy at Sur La Table, right?

Jan 19, 2007
SkipII in Home Cooking

Reposting - how to dry pasta noodles in a "nest" without sticking

I am making egg nooles with a mix of white flour and semolina. I will try the techniques. Thanks!

What did you mean, Potterstreet, when you said "shake them to make sure they are separated?" They will be in contact with each other when loosely looped into a nest.

Jan 13, 2007
SkipII in Home Cooking

Reposting - how to dry pasta noodles in a "nest" without sticking

I am not understanding something on how to dry homemade pasta noodles, e.g. fettucini.

Several web postings say to loosely curl them into a "nest" to dry but if I do they turn to a sodden mush. If I try to dry them enough ahead of time (over the back rung of a chair), they are not flexible enough to curl and they break.

It does not seem to matter how much I flour them.

I'm baffled.

Jan 13, 2007
SkipII in Home Cooking

Proper method to "next" pasta noodles for drying

Obviously I meant "nest."

Anyway, the question is how do I let the nodles dry in a "nest" as is often suggested without them sticking together.

Jan 13, 2007
SkipII in Home Cooking

Proper method to "next" pasta noodles for drying

I am not understanding something on how to dry homemade pasta noodles, e.g. fettucini.

Several web postings say to curl them into a next to dry but if I do they turn to a sodden mush. If I try to dry them enough ahead of time (over the back rung of a chair), they are not flexible enough to next and they break.

It does not seem to matter how much I flour them.

I'm baffled.

Jan 13, 2007
SkipII in Home Cooking

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

Well, since I started all this, I thought I better chime in.

Yes, uncoated aluminum needs to be seasoned -- and is seasoned routinely by professional cooks. Done well, it is far better than even Teflon -- the food slips right out of the pan.

My problem was trying a new method. What works for me -- and worked again when I went back to it in the midst of this debate -- was to mostly fill the pan with a high-temp vegatable oil (peanut, grapeseed, etc.)and bring it to barely the smoking point on the stovetop, drain it, let it cool and wipe it clean before any residue gums up. The surface is slicker than Little Richard's hairpiece.

Jan 10, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

Professor,

Thanks you for the informed response. I think I was putting too much oil on the pan.

As it turns out, since I had to use the pan later this week, I went back to my tried-and-true (though, at times, perious) method of filling the pan with veggie oil and heating it to light smoking-levels.

Works perfectly. I cooked an omelette on it at lunch and the egg practically jumped out of the pan.

Jan 09, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

Thank you for the relevant response. I live in KY and actually cannot find lard at the grocery store any more. I think I'll do the Crisco routine but then lightly fry up some lard-laden bacon I have in the fridge. My stovetop method worked great, so I guess my trade-off risk is between a stove fire or cholestrol!

Seasoning aluminum? Yes, any chef who uses aluminum seasons it.

Why use aluminum? It responds best to subtle changes in heat, needed when I am making things like omelettes. It is the only aluminum pan I have and it is reserved for that purpose. The other is a cast-iron skillet for the obvious (searing, cornbread, etc.) and the rest of stainless.

Thanks for your help.

Jan 09, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

This is my first time on this message board, but it has been interesting so far!

Yes, you do season cast aluminum. No, my problem is not melting handles.

My question is why the "coating" of oil is coming out so tacky. I nomrally have put oil in the pan on the stovetop and heated it up cose to the smoking point and then dumped it out and wiped it. Perfect. I have just never felt comofortable having that much oil near smoking point near an open flame, so I tried some of the oven methods -- with the poor results as noted.

Jan 09, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

I wonder if I should be letting it dry overnight?

Jan 08, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

OK, great. Thanks. Can you tell what directions they gave you?

Jan 08, 2007
SkipII in Cookware

Seasoning disaster with aluminum

I think I've read every post on the web to make sure I was up-to-date on the convetional wisdom on seasoning an aluminum pan.

I had a perfectly good and decently seasoned professional aluminum saute pan that a friendly house guest vigorously washed in soap (thanks!). So, I reseasoned by wiping the cleaned, heated pan with grapeseed oil (high smoke point) and putting upside down in a 350-degree oven for an hour, then letting it cool.

To start using it, I warmed it up and put in a bit of oil like I always do for cooking an ege and it glued itself to the pan.

What did I do wrong. This pan worked better than Teflon before I decided to "fix" it.

Thank you in advance -- but I am well-aware of just about every technique out there. I can't try them all. I am just wondering if it would help if I did this routine several times, or perhaps I needed to let it sit over night, or cool overnight?

Thanks for any help.

Jan 08, 2007
SkipII in Cookware