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Tarry Tavern Brunch

Since we've had a thread on "tarry tavern dinner" for quite some time now, and I've only recently discovered brunch at the Tarry Tavern, so, ...I thought it might be appropriate to start a new thread for those folks looking for a place to go at the weekend, perhaps more "middle of the day."

We've been back to the T.T. now the last few weeks for "brunch," and in each instance it has been spectacular. There's something about a restaurant when it's still daylight outside, and enough traffic on the sidewalk that's just missing in the evening. Daylight savings time changes aside.

Frankly, I might be a bit jaded about all of this, because, frankly, I absolutely hate brunch. But, there must have been at least 40-60 fellow diners in the restaurant with us each time, so the place must t be doing something right at 1:00 p.m. on a weekend.

Brunch, to me, is neither breakfast nor a decent other daily meal. The Tarry Tavern it seems, as best as it can, accommodates diversity for those who need to "brunch," by offering everything from pancakes to poached eggs to French toast. Fine, OK.

But, it's also refreshing to see a menu (for those of us who get up early enough each day), to where the "brunch" might actually be considered "lunch," or possibly, even, "dinner." The cute "Steak and Eggs -- Or Not" entree on the menu aside, -- which, BTW, is an absolutely delicious, perfectly prepared New York Strip Steak (black and blue a/k/a "Pittsburgh"), served with au gratin potatoes to simply die for, and a side of spinach, all for $22... how good is that? I didn't even bother with the optional eggs. Anywhere else (say, Morton's in White Plains, or Ruth's Chris in Tarrytown), the same quality, quantity, and presentation, would set you back twice that amount. Easy.....

Equally, the other dishes were also consistently excellent. The chicken liver mousse was well seasoned, and creamy, without being too coarse, too garlicy, and too oniony. The gnocchi appetizer delicious, the poached eggs and polenta (not for me, for the wife) excellent. Who would think to serve eggs with creamy, firm, lightly grilled polenta?

As I mentioned, the strip steak is great, and another time, I had the Maine scallops with a side of butternut squash, also faultless. And, save some room for dessert -- both the creme brulee or the cherry panna cotta will take the edge off that "brunchy" feeling.

So, if you want to "do brunch" like the boss -- consider the Tarry Tavern. It's definitely for grown-ups.

Nov 30, 2011
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Asagao Sushi in Croton

So I called.

No need to be suspect.

The gent who answered the phone ( a "Mr. Kim") said new owner, new management, new fresh food.

Nov 07, 2011
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Asagao Sushi in Croton

No, not strange.

Simply "under new management."

Don't know if that means "related" management, or truly "new."

The Internet has the answer: with a Google search of "Asagao Croton".

Nov 07, 2011
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Asagao Sushi in Croton

vinouspleasure, Marge,

When a restaurant is declared "gourmet" twice in the same sentence of a review, and a "pleasure" as well, and when another is referred to as "the best sushi in the area" (meaning, I presume, greater Westchester), then I wouldn't consider a response listing what really are considered by many the best Japanese restaurants as "misplaced."

There are too many neo-Japanese restaurants (some, as you point out, being cross-marketed by owners of Korean nail salons), that most "non-gourmet" casual diners tend to get fooled into thinking that what is served in these places is authentic Japanese cuisine.

It's not,and should be reported as such, IMHO.

Dec 31, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Asagao Sushi in Croton

vinouspleasure,

Not to disagree with two 13 year old gourmands, LOL, but the best Japanese restaurants (meaning authentic Japanese) in Westchester are:

Nanase
522 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605-2002

Arguably the best sushi in Westchester, but the chef is as selective about his customers as he is about his fish. This is a serious, authentic Japanese restaurant experience, and not a "rainbow roll" in sight.. No white tuna either.

Fujinoya Restaurant
26 South Central Avenue, Hartsdale, NY 10530

Also absolutely authentic, more "kid friendly" than Nanase, but not at the sushi bar. This is where local Japanese families eat early, the older crowd later. And, no white tuna.

Azuma Sushi Restaurant
219 East Hartsdale Avenue Hartsdale, NY 10530-3502

Also very authentic, and can also be picky about their customers. Sushi bar service is Japanese style, i.e., two pieces is one order, you pretty much have your own chef at the bar, they prefer omakase service. You should too. No white tuna, BTW.

Those are the best that spring to mind. There is also Sezan in Dobbs Ferry, also very good, but the chef there has more temper tantrums than one should have when the customers are paying you. Nishi, a stone's throw away, is also very good and authentic, but with no sushi bar and limited sushi menu. Go there for the nabe.

So, iIf you're looking to dine out with 13 year olds, why not try East in the Palisades mall. It won't break the bank, and the kids will enjoy the conveyor belt. Japanese owned, Japanese run, Central American chefs. But the Japanese owner does the buying, the fish quality is decent, especially given the prices, and your non-raw fish eating 13 year old gourmet will find enough selection off the conveyor belt to satisfy his gourmand proclivities.

And on that note, Oyasuminasai!

-----
Nanase
522 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains, NY 10605

Azuma
219 E Hartsdale Ave, Hartsdale, NY 10530

Fujinoya
26 S Central Ave, Hartsdale, NY 10530

Dec 20, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

BRIDGE VIEW TAVERN, SLEEPY HOLLOW NY

I agree -- being called "pal" and "buddy" by staff members old enough to be your children keeps me from the local gas station, and for that matter, this local restaurant. Neither "pal" nor "buddy" shall I be, when spending my "money."

On the beer side, well, yes, they have a good selection of microbrews, if that's your thing. Otherwise, the choice is Pabst BR in a can, or Guinness on tap. But then, microbrews are like the kit cars of beer -- some things are best mass produced in a big factory, and not hand assembled under the tree in your back yard. Not that big factories can't produce quality -- ask BMW, Mercedes, Ferrari, but if your running a tavern/pub, why not offer something like a crisp European Pilsner or Ale, along with the Vermont Butter Bacon Pumpkin Winter Ales?

As an alternative, check the Tarry Tavern on Main Street in Tarrytown. Good food, decent beer selection, and you'll always be a "guest" and "customer," but never a "buddy" or "pal."

Dec 13, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

sleepy hollow ;finalmente and villa napoli

Some additional thoughts to the above.

The place started out great. But then, schizophrenia set in -- on all fronts. For example:

-- The Owner/Manger "Dan," has a hard time deciding whether he is the gracious host (and he can be), or just the "regular guy" hanging out in front of the restaurant, leaning into the livery window, "yo-ing" the local cab drivers, and chain smoking cigarettes at the entrance. One or the other, but judging by the odor of nicotine upon his person when he approaches your table, hanging out on the sidewalk, dragging on a butt, is winning.

-- The Owner/Manager Dan, has a hard time deciding whether he should be attentive at the door as the guests arrive for the evening, or be bellying up to the bar having his dinner (admittedly during his dinner time, but then, unfortunately also everyone else's).

-- The Owner/Manager Dan, has a hard time deciding whether he is running a restaurant for dining, or an after hours singles haven for the local twenties (very young twenties, that cut their underage teeth at Michael's down the block before the place was forcibly closed), that comes alive at the stroke of eleven several times each week. Including dancing on the bar -- although, that crowd is fickle and may have moved on since this summer.

-- The chef, Donato, has a hard time deciding whether he should be cooking in the kitchen (which, when he does, the food is excellent), or schmoozing with the winsome younger (and older) ladies at the tables, telling corny, sometimes slightly ribald jokes. Lately, the Donato in the dining room is winning, which means the inexperienced staff in the kitchen is losing. So is the food..

-- The bartender Nina, who has a hard time deciding whether she should be customer oriented, or skeptical, if not downright "eeewwww" disgusted, by a customer's cocktail selection. And a classic Italian aperitif cocktail at that. Heavens to Mergatroid! Of all places, Campari in a cocktail in an Italian restaurant. The uprolled eyes and "eewwwws" not only tend to not bring the best in tips, they tend not to keep customers either.

I could go on, but there you have it -- the tale of so many restaurants. Off to a great start, but then the owner/management gets complacent, as does the chef, the bar, and the food.

What the cast doesn't understand is that, like a good show on Broadway, the performance has to be as good on the first night, as the night you pay to see their show.

Add a bit of what is written above (which, regretabbly, I've personally seen), and it's no wonder that the tables are empty, and there is a certain finality to Finalmente.

-----
Finalmente Trattoria
31 Beekman Ave, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591

Dec 13, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Tarry Tavern - Tarrytown?

No, not really.

Nov 19, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

tarry tavern dinner

Well, I'm glad to report that things are just fine at Tarry Tavern. The interior and overall ambiance is probably the best of any restaurant in Sleepy Hollow/Tarrytown.

The service is excellent, attentive, thoughtful, and friendly.

The menu has a series of terrific choices, including both a "pub fare" side and a market selection of seasonal offerings that rivals any competitor in the area, if not in the City. Every bit as good as New York City stalwarts like the Gramercy Tavern or the Union Square Cafe, for example, and all more convenient (if you live in the area), with very reasonable "out-of-the-City" prices.

My wife and I were there last night for the first time, and had the bone marrow and beet salad appetizers, the hand (and home) made fettuccine, the and duck breast (which was superb and cook to perfection). The dessert figs baked in a blanket were also world class, as were the little details (like the fabulously prepared vanilla ice cream served with the figs), that make the place. What about simple vanilla ice cream, you say? Well, there's vanilla ice cream like everyone serves, and then there's what the Tarry Tavern produces (sourced locally and fresh) -- simply the best tasting vanilla ice cream you've ever had, and also served at the proper temperature and consistency. Like I said, it's the details, and this was a little one, but they pervade the food, ambiance, and service. Which is what makes this a great restaurant.

For example, the owner is there to greet you, makes you feel welcome, and makes sure you are satisfied during the course of your meal. The wait staff is friendly, and in sight and available. The restaurant had a respectable number of covers last evening for a deary, cold Thursday night, yet it never felt noisy, crowded, hectic or rushed. It was just a very good experience.

As I posted above, the Tarry Tavern is the best restaurant in the area right now, and certainly one of the best in Westchester.

Nov 19, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Sour Kraut in Nyack?

sixelagogo,

Well, I went -- having finally gotten past the impossibly cute (or just corny) name, depending on your point of view, I guess. They are now indeed open, albeit somewhat disorganized. While I was there, the patrons were repeatedly asked to ignore the menu that was posted in the window (a printed version was also not given), but to refer instead to the blackboard behind the bar, for what was actually available that day. That worked well enough if you were inside, but the people seated at the sidewalk tables would have to go inside, read, memorize, then go back outside to order. This blackboard was also updated several times during lunch, apparently as additional dishes were being finished in the kitchen by two chefs plus a helper.

First the good news. The waitstaff was very friendly, and tried very hard to please. The owner (Marianne Olive, as referenced above) was also on site, greeting patrons and trying to keep things running smoothly. The restaurant has the best selection of German beers west of the Lazyboy Saloon in White Plains, and north of Yorkville in the City.

Now for the bad. In general, the food was OK, but only "OK" and certainly not an OK3. While scarce, there are better, much better, German restaurants in the Westchester/Rockland area, and certainly in the City.

But, what really sets "Sour Kraut" apart from the competition, and not just the German competition, are its prices, which are just simply ridiculous. Particularly for the quality of food, how it's served, and the portions involved. I'm not a "big portion = it must be good" patron by any means, far from it, -- but $23.00 for a lunch consisting of a couple of sausages, and two "sides" served in small ramekins plopped on your plate next to the wurst, well, that's simply egregious. $19.00 for two hot dogs smothered in a supposed "curry" sauce -- but really just ketchup with some curry added (and nothing like the stuff they serve in Germany) -- is even more egregious. Again, this is for L-U-N-C-H. Further, at these prices, bread, either before or during the meal, was never offered. I would think that if you are going to serve a spoonful of potato salad as a "side," at least have some bread available.

There were no appetizers, other than a soup. A couple of additional lunch entrees were also listed on the board (e.g., Leberkäse), all priced above $20.00. The much touted Sauerbraten written up in the early press announcements was nowhere in sight, and which when available, given the sausage and hot dog pricing structure, will I presume, probably hit the lunch menu in the high twenties, if not the low thirties. The absolute lowest priced offering was a simple hot dog on a bun for $8.00, with no sides.

Just by comparison, Hallo Berlin in the City, similar in decor and better in food, serves a two (2) sausage lunch special (with three sides), for $9.00 -- at dinner, with soup added, that goes up to $17.00. At "Sour Kraut", that same meal will set you back $23.00 -- for lunch. Even the notoriously expensive hot dogs at Yankee Stadium are cheaper -- and you get an actual live baseball game to go with them.

On the drinks front (they do have a full liquor license), the beers start at $7.00 bottle, then go quickly to $8.50, with several in the $9.00 up to $12.00 range. Three German beers are available on tap.

The decor consists of natural blond wood/exposed brick walls, Formica tables on metal column bases, black and white poster photos on the wall, not a tablecloth in sight, and a unisex bathroom accessible unfortunately only past the open (and almost full) garbage can in the kitchen itself. Prices aside, the food was simply not that good. The potatoes in the "German" potato salad were hard and undercooked; the seasoning bland to non-existent -- what bacon bits? The "creamy" cucumber salad was also completely bland, and any cream that should have dressed it had long ago run to the bottom of the tiny ramekin, possibly to disappear entirely forever. The sausages (from Kocher's in Ridgefield, NJ) were also mediocre -- there's a reason why most German places in the Tri-State area either make their own (the best way), or else simply rely on Schaller & Weber or Karl Ehmer. Sour Kraut's tube steaks were heavily grilled to the point of being dry -- most German restaurants do not grill their sausages to drying out, but rather pan or griddle fry them, like, well, most Germans do as well. Finally, also on offer to try, was some kind of ham/cheese/peppers salad (loosely based, I guess, on the German Wurst-Käse-Salat or the more common and famous Fleischsalat). What was served, instead, seemed more like leftovers (I'm sure it was not, of course), and while the "real McCoy" has wurst (not ham), cheese, onions, vinegar, gherkins and/or radishes, etc., this had none of the vinegar tartness of the real thing that some of the more authentic ingredients would have produced. It simply tasted (and looked) like a generic deli salad mix. And, nothing artful about the presentation either (yet another ramakin). After the experience with the entrees, I skipped the dessert.

There you have it, -- an excellent selection of beers, priced a dollar or several higher than the competition. Mediocre food, outrageously priced significantly higher than the competition, especially for a lunch menu. Especially in Nyack. And, quality not as good as the others, i.e., Hallo Berlin, Silver Swan, Old Heidelberg, Jennifer's, Zum Stammtisch, or even the Swiss Brasserie in Ossining. All are more viable, and much better, alternatives.

I had high hopes for the place, and I wish them the best of luck.

Oct 19, 2010
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Excellent New Greek Restaurant In Westchester

chloe4ever,

See my post above from February 6, 2008. I believe we are talking about the same gentleman -- does your experience sound at all familiar to mine?

The owner actually called me after my post (he had my number from the takeo out orders I'd made) to say that I was being unfair, and I had hoped our candid discussion would help improve things. Obviously he said I was completely wrong. But, between your experience and many similar ones in the other Santorini thread: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/520324 , it's a shame that such service and attitude drags down a place that serves decent Greek fare. Very sad.

Sep 14, 2008
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Bad experience at Niko's in White Plains

As the original reviewer of this restaurant on ChowHound (see http://www.chowhound.com/topics/443596), I am somewhat sad to post this review. Like so many upstart restaurants that hit the scene with aplomb, some manage to continue what makes them so successful, others drown in it. And Santorini is definitely drowning.

It appears that the fire (and soul) has gone out at Santorini. One of the original owners "Elias" (as he has Anglicized his name), no longer keeps a firm hand on the management, and spends quite a bit less time there. Instead, he now relies on one or two uncouth, sweating fellows who lean on the very small bar at the entrance, and cannot be bothered to acknowledge your presence, -- much less interrupt their conversation with the only waitress in the place.

So you wait, and the other diners wait.

And, after waiting patiently, you may finally be noticed with a low grunt (a full syllable it clearly is not), then a jerk of the head, -- if at all. And the place is not full, nor is it busy. One would expect that the newly minted owners would use attentiveness to the customers to make up for the lousy, edgy location (and lack of parking), but that is clearly not the case.

But the disappointment does not stop there, and I, as well as many of the initial supporters of the place, have noticed that much of the original quality that made Santorini has be replaced by oil and grease.

You can see it, -- it hangs in the air, you can smell it, -- it hangs in the air, and you can taste it, -- it hangs in your mouth. On a visit the other night, the odor was palatable -- and visible -- like the haze in old days when restaurants had smoking sections.

And that all translates into your food swimming in the same grease and oil -- and it follows you out with its smell in your clothes afterwards.

Clearly, the kitchen cannot handle the new volume, and the surly waitstaff and management can't either. While the food was initially better than at Lefteris (see above), this was most likely due to the low volume the kitchen needed to produce. It's now also obvious why Lefteris maintains its following and a consistently packed dining room -- always friendly service, management that takes an interest in its customers and running the place, not dating the waitress, and reasonable, if not spectacular food and quality.

All very sad when a promising place drops the ball. But also all so very common.

Feb 05, 2008
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Excellent New Greek Restaurant In Westchester

As the original reviewer of this restaurant on ChowHound (see first post above), I am somewhat sad to post this review. Like so many upstart restaurants that hit the scene with aplomb, some manage to continue what makes them so successful, others drown in it. And Santorini is definitely drowning.

It appears that the fire (and soul) has gone out at Santorini. One of the original owners "Elias" (as he has Anglicized his name), no longer keeps a firm hand on the management, and spends quite a bit less time there. Instead, he now relies on one or two uncouth, sweating fellows who lean on the very small bar at the entrance, and cannot be bothered to acknowledge your presence, -- much less interrupt their conversation with the only waitress in the place.

So you wait, and the other diners wait.

And, after waiting patiently, you may finally be noticed with a low grunt (a full syllable it clearly is not), then a jerk of the head, -- if at all. And the place is not full, nor is it busy. One would expect that the newly minted owners would use attentiveness to the customers to make up for the lousy, edgy location (and lack of parking), but that is clearly not the case.

But the disappointment does not stop there, and I, as well as many of the initial supporters of the place, have noticed that much of the original quality that made Santorini has be replaced by oil and grease.

You can see it, -- it hangs in the air, you can smell it, -- it hangs in the air, and you can taste it, -- it hangs in your mouth. On a visit the other night, the odor was palatable -- and visible -- like the haze in old days when restaurants had smoking sections.

And that all translates into your food swimming in the same grease and oil -- and it follows you out with its smell in your clothes afterwards.

Clearly, the kitchen cannot handle the new volume, and the surly waitstaff and management can't either. While the food was initially better than at Lefteris (see above), this was most likely due to the low volume the kitchen needed to produce. It's now also obvious why Lefteris maintains its following and a consistently packed dining room -- always friendly service, management that takes an interest in its customers and running the place, not dating the waitress, and reasonable, if not spectacular food and quality.

All very sad when a promising place drops the ball. But also all so very common.

Feb 05, 2008
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

In Sleepy Hollow, Greek Cooking for the Gods

As the original reviewer of this restaurant on ChowHound (see the digest above), I am somewhat sad to post this review. Like so many upstart restaurants that hit the scene with aplomb, some manage to continue what makes them so successful, others drown in it. And Santorini is definitely drowning.

It appears that the fire (and soul) has gone out at Santorini. One of the original owners "Elias" (as he has Anglicized his name), no longer keeps a firm hand on the management, and spends quite a bit less time there. Instead, he now relies on one or two uncouth, sweating fellows who lean on the very small bar at the entrance, and cannot be bothered to acknowledge your presence, -- much less interrupt their conversation with the only waitress in the place.

So you wait, and the other diners wait.

And, after waiting patiently, you may finally be noticed with a low grunt (a full syllable it clearly is not), then a jerk of the head, -- if at all. And the place is not full, nor is it busy. One would expect that the newly minted owners would use attentiveness to the customers to make up for the lousy, edgy location (and lack of parking), but that is clearly not the case.

But the disappointment does not stop there, and I, as well as many of the initial supporters of the place, have noticed that much of the original quality that made Santorini has be replaced by oil and grease.

You can see it, -- it hangs in the air, you can smell it, -- it hangs in the air, and you can taste it, -- it hangs in your mouth. On a visit the other night, the odor was palatable -- and visible -- like the haze in old days when restaurants had smoking sections.

And that all translates into your food swimming in the same grease and oil -- and it follows you out with its smell in your clothes afterwards.

Clearly, the kitchen cannot handle the new volume, and the surly waitstaff and management can't either. While the food was initially better than at Lefteris (see above), this was most likely due to the low volume the kitchen needed to produce. It's now also obvious why Lefteris maintains its following and a consistently packed dining room -- always friendly service, management that takes an interest in its customers and running the place, not dating the waitress, and reasonable, if not spectacular food and quality.

All very sad when a promising place drops the ball. But also all so very common.

Feb 05, 2008
EHS in Features

Excellent New Greek Restaurant In Westchester

"gutreactions" --

What kind of food do they serve?

Nov 17, 2007
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Excellent New Greek Restaurant In Westchester

As many of you know, I have commented on various Greek restaurants in Westchester in the past. While my opinion on those hasn't changed, I want to alert you to a very good new one:

Santorini -- Sleepy Hollow, NY (175 Valley St.) 914-631-4300. Turn onto Beekman from Route 9, left at the first light, follow the road down into the "Valley" past the car wash.

The restaurant just opened, and I would rank it as one of the best in the area -- Greek or otherwise (better than, for example, Lefteris in Tarrytown -- which, BTW, isn't all that bad, as a matter of fact, it's quite good). The location leaves something to be desired (it's way off the beaten track and a bit hard to find), but the place is so good, it's worth the effort.

The decor is very nice, the hygiene exceptional, and the service friendly and accommodating. The chef(s) are actually Greek, as are most of the folks working there. Parking is on the street, immediately after the restaurant proper, which is on the right side of the one way street.

Pricing is, I think very, very reasonable, and seems a bit less than the other places. Certainly the portions are generous.

Some thoughts (all in comparison to the usually available fare):

1. Taramosalata: This was a hit! Most places these days serve a creamy style, with very little of what the dish is actually supposed to contain, fish eggs. They're not even shy about hiding where it comes from -- big plastic tubs clearly labeled "Taramosalata" from a factory in Astoria, Queens. Look up, the next time you're at Lefteris. ;)

However, the appetizer here is clearly homemade -- you can actually see (and taste) the caviar, and the minced onions mixed in aren't bad either (nor are they overwhelming). Much more flavorful than the more generic cream "dip" from the other place(s). Probably some of the best I've had.

2. Dolmadakia: Again, better than most. stuffed, crisp, with a filling that's not been overcooked. Clearly home made. If you like your rice al dente (as opposed to mush), you'll enjoy these.

3. Avgolemono: One of my favorites, and something that often resembles Campbell's Chicken with lemon added. This soup is different. Creamy. Lemony. Chunky. With a delicious addition of orzo to add body. Fabulous.

4. The "Zeus" combo appetizer: The traditional Greek staples of Moussaka, Pastisio, Spanakopita and a generous slicing of Gyro meat. With a side of pita. All absolutely delicious -- while listed as an appetizer, it's a meal in itself.

I'm usually not a fan of these Greek staples, but thought we'd try them as a measure of the place. For example, the pastisio isn't just your basic "macaroni and cheese" -- this one is nicely flavored, and the noodles (seem) to be home-made, and not out of a box. Give it a try.

5. Lamb Souvlaki Platter: Very tender lamb, nicely grilled, as good as it gets.

The desserts were also uniformly good, and complete the meal perfectly.

All in all, the food had a delicious and custom-made flavor to it (I don't want to say "home-made" because, besides being trite, it deserves better than that moniker).

Definitely worth a try, a bit off the beaten Route 9 path, but worth the drive. Make the effort to find it, you won't be disappointed.

Opa!

Sep 21, 2007
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Mighty Joe Young - Hartsdale

Dolores --

Thanks for the compliment, and yes, I just went over the bill in my mind again . Of the four drinks, only one was a "cocktail" -- the other three were glasses of beer. It's not like we even bothered with a bottle of wine, for example. Total was $146 and change. And, the quality of the food didn't even rise to that of a decent diner.

May 05, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Mighty Joe Young - Hartsdale

This thread and these posts go back to 2004, now we are here in 2007, a full three years later, -- and let me assure the readers that there can be comfort in consistency. Some things stay the same, and that includes Mighty Joe Young in Hartsdale, NY.

It remains delightfully mediocre to just simply bad, overpriced, but with a quite incredible bar scene on a Friday night -- and it was still early and daylight. The new chef that someone mentions in their post would improve the place must since have left. Also, if you've never been there, about the atmosphere and clientele, -- think that restaurant at the Animal Kingdom, the one where they require reservations, but without character actors like Chip and Dale in safari suits table hopping during the course of your meal. Lots of tiki torches, chain-sawed African masks, and stuffed faux animals (or real, perhaps, judging by the bedraggled female lion near the door).

Some tasting notes:

The Shrimp Konga appetizer, on the menu with a "tangy cilantro basil glaze," arrives with the individual shrimp impaled on wooden skewers that sprout from a weary lopped-off pineapple top sitting forlornly on its plate. You can clearly tell that the shrimp are from the seafood category of the menu, because they definitely taste fishy, and the sticky glaze (think MeeTu brand duck sauce) just can't overpower that. Never mind that we saw probably our same pineapple top traveling to other tables later in the evening, but of course with new shrimp. The other appetizer was the Warm Grilled Octopus, listed as served with a "warm citrus vinaigrette and fava beans." As someone who likes to think he knows something about grilled octopus (see my recent post on Mykonos' version in Dobbs Ferry, NY), this was exactly the opposite of that -- four or five dry, stringy, chewy, listless, shriveled octopus tentacles, mixed into a warm salad that included broccoli rabe, sliced Bermuda onion, peppers of all colors, in short, everything you would find at the steam table of the local Chinese Buffet, but not at $4.49/pound.

On to the entrees. The first, the "wasabi horseradish crusted" salmon had that same "I've been out of the water a while" fish taste as the shrimp. Incredibly overpowering, so much so we left more than half, and it wasn't a big piece. The side was broccoli rabe (more on that later). The second entree was the grilled pork chop, which arrived thick and juicy -- almost too tick and too juicy, to the point of being strange, and perhaps quite a bit enhanced. Like the turkey roll, instead of the turkey breast. The side was, you guessed it, broccoli rabe.

Not quitting while we were ahead, we decided to have dessert, and I must say, the "Chiquita Banana" ice cream, homemade, the waiter told us, was quite good, as was the equally homemade chocolate pudding.

So, tax and tip, just shy of $150 for two, with a drink before dinner, and one during, for each of the two of us. For that food, that hurt.

One last note -- the restaurant advertises on its menu (twice), an appetizer and main course of "wild boar." Knowing something about federal game laws (you can read more about it here at the New York Times) -- http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.co... -- I asked our server if the boar was, in fact, "wild." He assured me that it was, which was further reinforced by the assistant manager, who came over to explain to us in vivid detail that the "wild" boar was, in fact, raised on a large Texas farm/ranch, where it was then, and I will try and be completely accurate with this quote -- "shot from a flying helicopter with a big rifle and high pressure bullets." I kid you not, I couldn't make this stuff up.

May 05, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Has anyone tried One in Irvington, New York?

This is the new seafood oriented restaurant in the old Solera space by the train station, on the river side of the tracks.

We went the other night. Nice decor (fluffed up from the prievious Solera look).

However, the charming barmaid can't make up for the egregiously overpriced drinks ($13 and up for a cocktail -- 15 clams for a flute of champagne), and the even more egregiously overpriced entrees -- $98 for a seafood platter? $4 for an oyster (yes, one oyster).

Cm'on, this is Irvington, not East 64th and Madison.

I wish them all the best, but as several others, including "yeshana" have posted, WAY overpriced.

Apr 30, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Westchester -- Authentic Japanese -- Hartsdale, NY -- Fujinoya

They used to be located in the shopping center there. Same owner, same chef, new location.

Apr 30, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Weekday lunch in Westchester or slighty north

"MisterBill2" --

Off at Exit 5 (Route 119 East), under the train bridge onto Main, left on Grove, right on Barker. 3 minutes, 11 seconds (well under four minutes); April 30th, 9:36 p.m.

I just drove it and timed it for you.

Apr 30, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Ultimate Westchester Restaurants 2006

South of South Lexington by the Ford dealership -- looks like a diner, because it was.

They now also serve a pretty authentic mixed grill (Peruvian).

Apr 30, 2007
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Mykonos in Dobbs Ferry.

Let me be the first to strongly disagree with the two posts so far. This is not only one of the best Greek restaurants in Westchester, but probably in the Tri-State Region, including New York City (and that includes those in Astoria, Queens). I have eaten in a number of Greek restaurants over the last thirty-five years, starting with the Symposium by Columbia University during my college days. It is interesting that "sausagekingofny" mentions Nikos in WHite Plains, because having eaten there a number of times, we compared it last night to Mykonos, which stands head-and shoulders above that place. Also Mykonos is much, much better than some other Westchester favorites like Lefteris in Tarrytown (and now Mt. Kisco as well). BTW -- I happen to like Lefteris, given that I live in Sleepy Hollow, but, in short, Mykonos served one of the best meals I've ever had, the staff was friendly, and the service perfect. No, I'm not in any way affiliated with this place, but the word should get out.

After having some complimentary Skordalia (with excellent warm pita), we started with the Shrimp Saganaki, which was a delicious variation on the traditional broiled cheese with lemon. The shrimp were perfectly grilled, with a nice charcoal flavor bite, and blended into the cheese with a delicious tomato-based sauce. Next, as a fan of Taramosalata, I was impressed that Mykonos actually makes their own, and does not get it in the five gallon plastic tubs like some other Westchester restaurants do ;) -- the dip was neither too bland, nor too salty and briny. Just delicious. For a main course, the grilled octopus was simply the best that I've ever had in the U.S. or on the Mediterranean -- and I am addicted to things like grilled octopus. Nikos' grilled octopus does not even compare to this -- this was fresh, again with a hint of char-broil flavor, and critical to this dish, it was tender and moist, but without being too soft and gooey. All served on a bed of thinly sliced and grilled eggplant -- fabulous eggplant -- finally with flavor that is often missing in this vegetable.

The meal was accompanied by an excellent retsina -- I'm sorry I don't remember the name -- but ask the bartender or the manager for the imported Greek retsina that does not taste like any retsina you have ever had -- not at all like drinking wine mixed with a baseball pitcher's resin rag. For dessert, finish it with a thick, gritty, incredibly strong Greek coffee (unprompted, the server offered three choices -- regular, moderate, or sweet).

I just cannot recommend Mykonos highly enough. The best Greek food in Westchester.

Give it a try, listen to the menu recommendations of the manager, -- I don't think you will at all be disappointed.

Apr 30, 2007
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Westchester -- Authentic Japanese -- Hartsdale, NY -- Fujinoya

Don't have the new phone number, and they do not have lunch specials, although they have a less expensive lunch menu.

Feb 24, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Weekday lunch in Westchester or slighty north

"MisterBill2"

You are correct, it's "not likely 5 minutes" off 287, --- more like 4 minutes, according to Google Maps and my own experience.

Jan 25, 2007
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Westchester -- Authentic Japanese -- Hartsdale, NY -- Fujinoya

Fujinoya Restaurant just opened on Route 100 near the "Five Corners" intersection in Hartsdale, NY on Route 100 (the former "Texas Cowboy" place).

As someone who enjoys (and is always seeking) "real" Japanese cuisine, I highly recommend this place.

We are talking authentic Japanese, no fake Korean or Chinese imitations. No rainbow kitchen sink rolls.

But, if you want real Kitsune Udon for lunch, fabulous Battera (all flavors, with the clear seaweed topping), OMG simply unbelievable Bara-Chirashi, Shishamo every day, etc. etc., all at reasonable prices and with the expected Japanese style service, this is the place.

No liquor license, or credit cards, but Meijiya and the Japanese liquor (sake, awamori, plum wine, shochu) store are a half block away -- simply BYO.

In any event, please help this place stay in business. While the interior layout isn't the greatest, the service, food, and authenticity more than make up for anything else in Westchester. And, don't be afraid to order sushi just because there is no formal sushi bar.

Oh, speaking of authentic Japanese...., be sure to check out the bathroom. Apollo, launch control......

Dec 29, 2006
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Ultimate Westchester Restaurants 2006

1. Fujinoya, Route 100, Scarsdale, NY (new) Japanese
2. Lazy Boy Saloon, Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY Beer
3. Miski, East Post Road, White Plains, NY "real" ceviche
4. Abis, Mamaroneck, NY Japanese
5. .....errrr,

Dec 29, 2006
EHS in New York State (exc. NYC)

Irvington, NY (not too expensive if possible)

As a twenty (20) year resident of Tarrytown, stay away from Horsefeathers at all costs.

Terrible place, your basic bean chili and bad burger joint.

Get your muzerell' stick fix somewhere else.

The owners, especially the wife, well... enough said.

Dec 29, 2006
EHS in General Tristate Archive

Todai in Galleria Mall

Well, I agree with KarenNYC, the food isn't that bad if you know your way around Japanese food, and know how to pick and choose.

All irrelevant now, because the place is out of business.

Dec 29, 2006
EHS in General Tristate Archive