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billmarsano's Profile

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Where to change my e-dress on Chowhound?

At login there's a place to click re forgotten password, but nothing re changing an e-dress. And since mine has . . . what to do. I can still login under the OLD bill@billmarsano.com but I'm certain to miss something or confuse people unless I can get billmarsano@rcn.com, installed.

Aug 28, 2008
billmarsano in Site Talk

Grand Cru Trio

Gorgeous but inefficient and probably maddening design dreamt up by someone who doesn't use a corkscrew. The top of the screw--the part you'll have to grab and turn--looks to be about the size of a half dollar piece, maybe a silver dollar, and that isn't big enough.

Aug 27, 2007
billmarsano in Features

Socca

Actually, Socca developed somewhere along the Italian Riviera long before it was so called--way back when Nice was Italian and called Nizza. It is still found all along the coast of Liguria--any kitchen store selling what look like copper pizza pans is actually selling pans for this treat, which here is called farinata. Actually seeing it made is a treat--there's a very popular restaurant in Chiavari that specializes in it. It's deep in the town (not on the seafront) and I don't recall the name but Chiavari's small enough that asking around will get you there soon enough.

Aug 27, 2007
billmarsano in Recipes

Tips for a stuck cork

Stuyck pseudocork? Just push it in--you've wasted enouigh drinking time already. Lijkewise w/natural corks. so shat idf you get a bit of cork in ther wimne/ then wimne's ben in contact w/cork since it was bottled, and the only damage is to appearances. That disappears when you get out your strainer.

As to ort tongs--those are the things to use. Pincers from the hardware store are meant for pulling nails and probably won't work--they have very shallow "throats," don't open v. wide and have a 'bite' that would go parallel to the neck of the bottle rather than across. but the idea of chilling the neck after heating is correct as per demonstrated for me by Adrian Bridge of Taylor Fladgate. Instead of an ice cube he used a strip of cloth soaked in ice water.

Jul 16, 2007
billmarsano in Wine

Authentic pizza oven outdoors

Your best bet is to locate pizzerie that make good pies in wood-fired ovens ansd consult with the owners.

Pile the wood on either side; don't think it makes a difference except to traditiopn (which is good enough reason to keep t on the left). Small opening in front, small smoke hole in the rear--the idea is to retain heat, yes? Hardwood only except maybe for small amount of kindling to start not pine, fir, whatever junk is found in watse piles. the skids (only) of many shipping pallets are oak--perfect. When the interior of the oven is white with ash and the fl;ames are dancing a slow waltz, then you can cook.

Jul 16, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

your one kitchen design tip

1. Not only did Consumeer Reports find that many high-end/rendy appliance brands have poor repair records but the NYTimes reported that it can be really difficult to find repairmen outside of big cities.

2. For lower cabinets--yeah, drawers are find but always of fixed height, so there's always stuff that won't fit. And drawers eat lots of space and cost plenty. On the other hand, two dorrs opening to a cave w/a single shelf--often inconvenient and the doors are always blocking light and the hinges coming loose. So we pulled out the shelf and stuck in sliding weire baskets from effa or Ikea. wjhen rich, I will solve the door problem by having new cabinets with tambour doors. Doors that actually get out of you way--waht a concept!

3. At the building stage, adjustable-height countertops will cost more but are no problem for skilled tradesmen. Or a spring-loaded platform could be built into the under-cabinet space--the little setback rectangle that holds the cabs up and gives tioe clearance. it's always wasted pace.

4. If your contractor tries to talk you out of some special feature or other, saying it's not really any good, or otherwise vaguely running it down, here's what's happening. There's (probably) nothing wrong with the feature, it's just that your contractor has litttle or no experience with it and won't admit it). You can insist that he do it, but chances are he'll screw it up.

Jul 15, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

New Chantal Cookware - Copper Fusion

Haven't seen it and won't waste time/money on any modern copperware. All of the odern stuff I've seen consists of a thin layer of copper laminated to a thick core of stainless, aluminum or some such other metal. They will surely cook just fine, but the copper is mere decor--oh, and for a generally huge price premium. The less copper is in the pan, the less it IS a copper pan. It's just a stainless pan painted copper, so to speak. Anything added to copper essentially interferes with and mutes the effect/benefit of the copper. That's why tin lining is best for copper--by weight, there's practically no tin compared to weight of copper, esp in a good copper pan: which Julian C always said should be the thickness of 2 pennies. (Though I've seen many restaurant saute pans much thinner.)

There are 2 advantages to copper. One, which everyone cites, is even heating. That's not really such a big deal; even heat's no trick any more. Much more important and far less known is transparency to heat. Copper heats like lightning--and when you turn the heat down, it cools fast too. Either way, there's very little lag, so the pot responds to what you want to do with the food. Copper does not store residual heat that keeps cooking food after you've reduced heat--at least not to the extent of cast iron, etc.

That said, there's little reason to have copper for anything but pans used over high heat--saute pans, skillets, frypans. Copper stock pots are dramatic things, but they really don't do anything that any other well-made pot will do over well modulated heat. Copper pots have traditionally been ALL copper because laminating metal is a rather new development. Even so, high-heat pans need copper only on the bottom--where heat is applied. The old Revereware line probably had it right--copper bottoms, stainless elsewhere.

Of course, cleaning copper is a trial. Salt and vinegar is i believe the customary restaurant treatment--it gives a nice satin glow. The new-penny shine, so popular in magazine layouts, can be achieved only by elbow grease and noxious polishes--nd it disappeares the first time heat is applied.

I once got good results by boiling my copper in vinegar but the effort and expense of boiling fives gallons or so of vinegar was such that I didn;'t repeat the experiment.

What;'s your method?

Jul 15, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

Help with Corkscrews

Most "waiter's friend" corkscrews are badly designed--the distance between the fulcrum and the screw is such that you can't get a straight upward pull but instead are trying to yank the cork through the neck of the bottle. Pulltaps w.f. models are much better than the standard design--their 2-step pull eliminates awkwardness.

Hounds proposing replacing the auger are correct: after a time, the slippery coating that eases operation wears off. Cork is very abrasive, after all: cork is used to polish smooth the edges of glass slabs used for doors and tables.h

Apr 22, 2007
billmarsano in Wine

Wine Label Design [mini-rant]

In v. few cases does a "mere" winemaker have anything to say about labels. That'll be marketing's job, and marketing will yield to the art department. ADs have entrenched hostility to type, which they express by using small, sans-serif faces that have low contrast and low-legibility. They obscure them further with shiny foil, which they apparently don't realize is tacky more often than not. Both ADs and marketing types then see and approve these design under bright studio lighting, not under restaurant or even retail lighting conditions. The virus Leper cites goes far beyond wine and Wired. ADs copy each other relentlessly. As a result, even general-interest large-circulation magazines are full of fuzzy type, "white" type only 6 points high, type on colored backgrounds and other reader-hostile fads.

Apr 22, 2007
billmarsano in Wine

Creature wine labels

I liked Smoking Loon just fine--and Rex Goliath, too, the wine of the godzilla rooster. Also Mionetto vino novello (baby chicks) and several others.
As for the WSJ's "critter = bad"--if that is the conclusion the writer reached, some perspective--lots, actually--is required. First, they write for WSJ readers--and theirselections show it. Rarely do they mention anything under $50 a bottle. And not long ago they discoursed rapturously about a bottle that provided a much-longed-for moment of incandescence. Fine--but it vost $1700 a bottle.

There are lots of labels out now that seemed to have been created to jump on the critter bandwagon, and here the sweeping "critter = bad" is a safer conclusion, because crittrs have been on labels since long before "critter WINES" were dreamt of. I've enjoyed Frog's Leap, ancho Zabaco (with its dancing bull) ,Toasted Head (fire-breathing bear), Wild Horse, Firesteed and Duckhorn, among others.

In short "critter = bad" belongs with "French = good."

Apr 22, 2007
billmarsano in Wine

Restaurant Ripoffs: Wine and Water

I'm getting to hate restaurants, especially because of their ripoff policy on wine pricing. For example, recently at the Bryant Park Cafe the cheapest wine on the list was $30. Not so bad--but I know they got it for about $6 wholesale (Beverage Media Monthly tells all!)

Latest scam: selling tap water! Pretending to respond to environmental concerns about the waste involved in bottled water (glass and plastic, shipping over long distances) some fancy joints are not filtering tap water and selling it for $6+ a bottle.

By the way, eco-pals:Restaurants that use "reverse-osmosis" filtration are the worst offenders. This kind of filter WASTES 5 gals of perfectly clean municipal tap water for every gallon of filtered water it delivers.

Anybody for BYOB? How about restaurants that encourage BYOB--are there any?
(I know there are plenty that try to kill it by charging ruinous corkage fees--and would be glad to hear from 'Hounders about excesses they've experienced.

Apr 22, 2007
billmarsano in Wine

Help! I'm Lost on the Site!

Many months ago I registered--and since then illness intervened and kept me offline. On returning, I can't figure out how to post except here on Feedback, which seems to be about comment on the site itself. (I just threw in a post re white chocolate out of desperation.) At My Chow I find all my previous posts but don't see how to add a new one.

Apr 21, 2007
billmarsano in Site Talk

Is 'White Chocolate' Really Chocolate?

Or is it mere some sweet sugar concoction invented by confectioners? I've tried some and it sure doesn't taste like chocolate.

Apr 21, 2007
billmarsano in General Topics

New to site: help!

Also new. I can't figure out where/how to post a question--that, to start a new topic.

Feb 07, 2007
billmarsano in Site Talk

Risotto in a Rice-Cooker? Oatmeal?

Anybody tried these? I've been thinking about it for some time now but though I should float the idea to see whether anyone's already blazed this trail.

Variables: My wife has tried rolled oats (quick-cooking but not, I think, actually 'instant') and we have only an old rice cooker--a 10-yr vet w/no adjustments beyond ON and OFF. The newer models (which I long to splurge on!) seem to be highly adjustable.

FYO, her results were just OK. Microwave was better. But I want to move on to the tastier steel-cut oats (Irish porridge). They take lots of cooking/stirring, which I'd prefer to avoid.

Also--what about risotto? Shd work in a rice-cooker, no? Maybe after overnight soaking?

All I can offer here is the correct pronunciation:

ree-ZOHT-tow not the usual ri-Zotto (and in Lotto). Note that in Italian a single S (except at the beginning of a word) is a Z or TZ sound.

Jan 28, 2007
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Knives: Temper, Temper!

Warning: Just about all of my knife "knowledge" is opinion and experience. Feel free to disagree or correct as required.

A critical quality in a blade is temper. A fine blade is what I call a 'live blade,' it has what I call a 'watch-spring temper.' So in considering any knife I perform the infamous Marsano Tap Test:
Hold the knife lightly between thumb and index finger, just above the rivet nearest the bolster (or thereabouts) blade flat to the cutting board, and bounce the tip on the board. It should bounce right back, eagerly, gthe way a drum stick does during a drum roll (which works mainly by bouncing the stick off the drumskin). That will be, all else being equal, a fine knife.

If the blade clanks or clunks or resists bouncing, just lies there, you haven't got a knife. You've got a paint-stirrer.

The watch-spring blade will also give a cleaner, clearer skating sound on a steel than the low-quality blade will.

A 12-inch steel from a restaurant supply is a must, I think; the 10-inchers from consumer stores are lame. If like me you've got some old carbon-steel jobs (I have a swell old Deerfield and a fartoo-big Sabatier) modern steels may be too harsh. Not sure. Anyway, I lonmg ago got an old steel from the '40s at a flean market, and always use that.

As it happens I get to a lot of restaurants (and boy am I getting sick of them), but I'll try to remember in future to seek access to the kitchens and see about collecting more edgy opinion therein.

Jan 27, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

Henckels Twin Select, Wusthof Grand Prix, Global, MAC or Shun Stainless?

Soypower, you are getting tons of great advice, to which I add:
1. If big restaurant-supply stores are accessible, visit them. You can get good guidance and may get a better deal--after all, consumer shops aim at consumers, many of whom are susceptible to clever salesmanship and good looks. Restaurant suppliers cater to pros, who are mainly interested in results.
2. Don't buy a set? Right.
3. Use a steel? Yes; three strokes a side EVERY TIME and you'll get great service for a long time. However, the steels sold to consumers are crap so far as i'm concerned--oly 10-in long and really crude. Go to a restaurant supply and get a fine-grained 12incher. THEODORE: pls weigh in on steel and the very-hard Shuns abnd Rockwells Do they work/ Special steels needed?

Jan 27, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

Santoku knives -- are they that great?

Theodore: I've been off-line and on deadline so missed your helpful reply (thanks!). I gather you have expert knowlege in metallurgy and knives? Certainly want to know more (esp because me fell suspicion has been confirmed!!) Can you suggest where to look for more on 'vac-de;posyed atomic layers'?

Re the hardness--correct to say thet willl also be harder to re-sharpen? Can you set the edge with a steel, as w/Western knives? Or is professional re-sharpening on the cards? (Possibly a real problem for folks outside large cities.) Excellent point about sharpness not defined!

Jan 27, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

Cracking Pizza Stones

I have 3 pizza bakers:
1. a large rectangular pizza stone--quite goodl; bought for $10 at a close-out store, so originally it was pricier;
2. A 12-inch round pizza stone a neighbor tossed out, also quite good; and
3. red brick pavers of coarse texture, which I lijke best.

The rectangle is usable either side. The round job has concentric ribs on the bottom. The pavers (and this may not be the correct name, or may be a name not in universal use) are about 4x7 in, about 3/8ths thick. I adopted them as soon as I discovered them, more or less byaccident, 20-odd years ago, after I gave up on quarry tiles. Warning: In a previous pizza discussion someone with some expert knowledge said not to use them; they will splinter; splinters will stick in the dough; the result will be dental catastrophe. I say that in fairness to all readers. My own experience--quite a bit of pizza-baking on pavers since the 1980s--does not validate that opinion.

Pavers and stones alike go into the dishwasher and come out fine.
Flour is tossed (by some) onto the peel and/or stones/pavers for the express purpose of simulating real pizzeria bottom-char. Don't do it if you don't like it.

Excess moisture is I'm sure the cause of dough sticking to the peel, and I'm working on dryer dough--but still want the elusive bubbles (will advise).Certainly sticking can be damned messy! In my case it has resulted in an entire pizza--except for the dough!--sliding directly onto the bricks. Cures the sin of pride just like THAT!

Pre-heat the brick? Well, it has never occurred to me not to: if you're going to bake on stone, it has to be hot If it isn't you're baking the stone and the pzza at the same time.

Have never had trouble w/pizza sticking to stones/bricks in the oven--just on the peel. Have seen the 3-sided stone inserts--expensive, cumbersome, clumsy to store--so have never tried them. For best top baking I raise the bricks to half height or higher in the oven.

Re wet dough and semolina/cornmeal: I'll bet that won't work. The foemr will probably melt into the dough as it does when you flour bread dough too lightly. The corn meal wont be absorbed but wet dough will collapse around it, killng the 'ball-bearing' or rolling effct you desire. Important that peel is dry! Many forget this!

Cast iron? Hmm. Maybe. If you've got a large iron skillet or flat gribble, experiment.

Soapstone (these days mainly used for v. pricy sinks) has a long history in cooking--has been succcessfull made into pots, gribbles, as it's v. soft.

Jan 27, 2007
billmarsano in Cookware

Shaping Pizza Dough

Jambalaya, tks for the 'wheel' method; I'll try it. That and your floppy method sem to argue in favor of my soft-flour dough, which is what is used in Italy. Still, maybe extra rest compensates. I've been told that the better American pizzerias hold dough 24 hours in the cool dough box before using it.

Hah! we think it's 'just pizza' and only later find out how much we have to learn.

Jan 11, 2007
billmarsano in General Topics

Shaping Pizza Dough

Yes--roonm temp only. With hands, not a pin. (If a pin is actually needed, then the dough's too stiff from cold znd probably made w/too much hard flour. I recommend at least 1/3 of flour be cake flour [Swanson's is one brand] or Italian '00' flour, avble NYC at Buonitalia in Manhattan's chelsea Mkt, and probably oter specialty stores here and there.

For a clumsy person like me, using my hands or over stretching it over my fist is still a kind of ritual humiliation. I've seen real experts turn the stuff out so the disk ripples like a silk handerchief, and I hide my face in shame.

I can't imagine the wet-dough/parchment business--fine if it works for you, but I've seen masters at work: their way is absolute simplicity, and that's what I aim at. Is the wet dough extra crunchy?

Jan 10, 2007
billmarsano in General Topics

Bittman's no-knead bread recipe?

Well, my scale works well enough to satisfy the Post Office. It read 1 lb when I put a 1 lb package of spaghetti on it and 5 lbs when I put a standard scale weight on it. So I doubt that the scale is at fault. Also, I did the artihmetic on 2 calculators, and they agreed. The 'weight of water' came off the web. But if you want to double check with your scale, my figures are:
1 C. unsifted flour weighs 7.1 or 7.2 oz so 3C weigh 21.5 oz or ca.595 gm. 80% of that figure = ca 480 gm.

Water weighs ca. 29.6 grams per ounce, so the 13 oz or 1-5/8th C) called for = ca .384 gms. (I'm saying 'ca.' here to stave off decimal points.) or only about 65% of the 595 gm weight of the flour. This leaves me with 96 grams of water less than the 80% weight (480). Those 96 grms = 3.25 fl oz. For an '80%' recipe the water would have to be 16oz (2 C) not 13 oz.

So something is passing strange here.

Anyway, I'm not going to worry overmuch about this, having arrived at my own solution. I followed the Bittman/Lahey recipe very closely but added one more C. flour (+ a little more salt and very little more yeast). That works out to water at a little less than 50% of flour weight. My two rises totaled 12 hrs at most and the result is a delight--great crust, very good crumb. I expect even better if I rise a little longer next time. I cut it short because it looked so ready to go.

Dec 26, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Help! I've Got a Ham for Christmas!

Website is where I went first--has absolutleynothing re using Stahl-Meyer's product. I called the company to ask--they thought I was joking. Finally 3 or 4 guys (I heard them consulting each other in the background) agreed on some ideas that didn't sound convincng at all!

Dec 25, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Bittman's no-knead bread recipe?

Bill Marsano's Revolutionary No-Knead Bread Recipe!!

I've been reading and digesting all these posts and, despite what looks like good advice from people who know their stuff, I decided to go my own way, just to get it out of my system. Sometimes I insist on learning the hard way. And sometimes it unexpectedly pays off, as follows.

Although the commonest thread in thisthread was "must maintain the water-flour ration posited by Bittman/Lahey" I went ahead with my earlier idea of avoiding my peroblems: dough that was supersticky and refusing to hold any kind of shape not imposed by gravity. so I added lots more flour--1 C, which is 1/3 more than the orig recipe. Also increased salt in proportion but yeast just a wee bit. My approach being this: let the long rise do the work w/o help from high water content.

I hurled the dry stuff into a bowl and stirred the water in w/a spatula--the work of a minute. Stuff looked exactly like the B/L original. Covered and set to rise.

After 6 or 8 hrs had a beautiful rise all bubbly on top, just as B/L require. Not wanting to rush things I waited another 2 hrs (sorry for not taking notes--I was Xmas fatigued). finally at 8 or 10 hrs I concluded that I mus do something and commence 2d rise. I turned the stuff out onto a well-floured countertop. Stuff exited the bowl readily if not with alacrity and despatch. Certainly with ease, helped by a loosening spatula. V. little left behind on sides of bowl, none stuck to spatula. I floured the counter and top generousy (I put a lot on figuring that what isn't needed will fall off, and that's what happened) and began shaping. Not kneading--I just spent a minute or less 'balling' the blob. It made a nice ball and more or less held it or something like it. The main appeal for me was that it didn't immediately flatten into a sheet and begin flowing downhill to threaten Hawaiian villages. Again, this was just a minute's work. Oiled bowl lightly. Oiled hands and rolled blob in them. Dumped into bowl, covered it, set it aside. Note: the two shaping sessions took less time by far than it took to get the dough out of the bowl the first time. And I mean shapng--no kneading action used.

FYI, I had cut the first rise short because I feared the dough would rise to the point of collapse, which I gather is not a good thing. I held the second rise to about two hours (plus oven-warming time) because it look really fine and ready, and, at 2 AMish, I was damned weary. Dumped blob on stone, covered w/same big steel salad bowl used earlier, prayed. 30 min later, uncovered--prognosis good. Half hour later (heat 450 throughout) took the thing out.

It's a triumph, I think. A nice big round healthy boule shape, lovely crust, beautiful color, good crumb w/nice irregular holes, great taste--all in many hours less than B/L with much less mess and stickiness.

Maybe it's just dumb luck, not to be repeated, but if you want to try my way, I used 4C flour (King Arthur white) to 13 fl oz water, a little more salt and yeast. If you want to weigh: My postal scale said the King Arthur (unstirred,unsifted) was 7.1 to 7.2 oz per cup. If you go to http://www.fourmilab.ch/hackdiet/www/...
you'll find a metric conversion guide that will do the grams for flour and also tell you the weight of water per fluid oz.

Good luck all!

Dec 25, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Bittman's no-knead bread recipe?

TKS. Might try something like that. I didn't want to risk my Iittala wonder pot--the magnificent one designed by Timo Sarpanava, which has just gone (expensiverly) back into production after a long and lamented time off the market. It's glazed inside and I just didn't know whether it was a good idea to put such a pot empty into an over to heat to 450--and then dump in a blob of dough that would be say 375 degrees cooler. Scary!

But for all Bittman/Lahey followers I have come up with another approach, which I will detail in a post at the end of this string. Check it out!

Dec 25, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Bittman's no-knead bread recipe?

Father Kitchen: I tried the Lahey again yesterday; it was another semi-failure. Low rise but great crust. However, I want to discuss it in terms of yr post in which you say the water shd be about, by weight, 80% of the flour weight, because my calculations suggest that's far from the Lahey proportions.

Lahey/Bittman say:
3 C flour + 1-5/8 C (13 fl oz) water.
3 C flour = 21.3oz = 595 gm
13 floz water = 13.56 oz weight = 384.4 gm

So far, so good (I think!), but 80% of 595gm = 476gm!
The water weight (384) = 65%, a serious difference.

At 80% water by the above calculations I'd think the mix would be close to wallpaper paste. Obviously I'm missing something or mis-calculating, but I did weigh carefully, use a metric conversion guide and doublecheck but switching back and forth from Avoi. to metric on my electronic scale.

As for my 2d try: Dough not as wet/sticky this time, possibly because I just dug my Cup measure into the flour and excavated. First time I stirred the flour to break any clumps; that probably had a sifting effect, incorporating air. Dough looked fine at all stages, nice and bubbly. Was just barely able to 'fold' it--was more like flopping and slopping. I left 2d rise go 2 hrs + time to heat oven. Baked on stone under inverted steel bowl. I'd hoped to use a smaller bowl but the dough was still in lava-flow mode. Baked @ 450 throughout (in a previous post I said I'd forgot to reduce heat after uncovering--don't know where I got that idea; recipe says 450 period. Uncovered after 30 min, baked 30 min more and cooled. Remain perplexed. Comment, pls?

Dec 24, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

pizza dough questions

Well, I use it when I can, which is often because I travel a few times a year to Italy and always take a spare suitcase to fill w/food. I've found I can get 0/00 in NYC at Buonitalia (swell store) in Chelsea Market, so it is imported. Will try to remember to get a brand name for you. But ask your stores to check Buonitalia--I think that is the importer's name as well as the store's. Otherwise, I was told American cake flour can be blended in w/success.

Dec 22, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

pizza dough questions

Maybe our pavers differ or nomenclature differs, but I have used them repeatedly for 20 years--the same ones, too. Yes, the temp diff is drastic, but heating oven to 550 is hardly fast (the pavers are in the over from get-go).

Dec 22, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

how to time no-knead bread?

Seefood: Blv me I did flour my hands--repeatedly! And, in desperation, heavily. Nevertheless, may try again the original way. Re temp: may have misread recipe but I recall it saying bake under cover 30 min/450; remove cover & reduce to 300 or 350. Have to find recipe to be sure, though. May use my Iittala enameled-iron pot next time--though spreading, at the baking stage, was no problem. It was really unmanageable--like a lava flow--after the first rise. More to come.

Dec 22, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking

Bittman's no-knead bread recipe?

I hope to try the bittman recipe again over the next couple of weeks with some variations, and will report to you all, disasters included. My bittman was a semi-success. Dough like lava--IMPOSSIBLE to fold. Looked great in the bowl, bubbly surface and all, but wouldn't let go of the bowl. Went the full length on both rises, baked on stone under a big mixing bowl--probably too big per one of the above posts. Plan to increase flour-to-water proportion. May even try a wet towel instead of a bowl.

Great thing about terry cloth--no baker makes that mistake twice!

Dec 22, 2006
billmarsano in Home Cooking