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Advice for my Mum on printing her own recipe book

Coincidentally just yesterday I saw an advert for Photobox who do a special format for cook books. I haven't used it myself but might be worth a look. It's a uk web address.

Aug 23, 2014
flashria in Home Cooking

Tasty, interesting, cheapish, central?

thank you very much for your thoughts so far.

Kathryn, we are travelling from Somerset in the UK. The food market looks great and we will be there in July so could definitely get there.

Spiritchaser, yes I did mean $50 per head per meal - that's for evening meals and we'll be looking for sandwiches or snacky things for lunchtimes.

Motosport, that's very useful information. We walk a lot at home and love to do it but I'm still trying to get my head around the distances involved in NY, so it's great to hear we'll be able to cover some distance on foot.

Jun 20, 2014
flashria in Manhattan

Tasty, interesting, cheapish, central?

We've booked our first-ever trip to the US, hooray!

It includes three nights in New York and I can't wait. Travelling with Mr Flashria and two teenage boys. Could anybody please help by suggesting some places to eat which fit the bill mentioned above? Trawling online gives me so much I just don't know where to start.

-Boys are pretty adventurous but probably wouldn't appreciate 'posh' or 'fine dining'; they don't really do finesse!
-Looking perhaps 50$ a head, is that realistic?
-More interested in a good atmosphere and tasty food that we wouldn't perhaps get elsewhere than 'haute cuisine'
-We will be within walking distance of Penn Station
-Ideally it would be somewhere not just created with tourists in mind

Am I asking the earth?! If anyone could give me some ideas I'd be so grateful, thanks

Jun 19, 2014
flashria in Manhattan

What food or foods is your town known for ?

I live in Cheddar!

Sep 09, 2013
flashria in General Topics

One Week in Devon - Restaurants, Farm Shops, and Cideries

Devon is a great county with loads to see and do, I hope you have a lovely time: have you found this website yet? It has some info which may be useful.

http://www.visitdevon.co.uk/food-drink/

Sep 09, 2013
flashria in U.K./Ireland

Suggestions on New Baking Project

Here it is! I've paraphrased but it's pretty accurate, although I'm afraid it's in english measurements. I hope you have a scale or can convert!

For the dough: 75 ml lukewarm milk, 60 ml tepid water, 2 oz caster sugar, 2 1/4 tsp dried yeast, 12 oz plain flour, 2 oz butter, 2 eggs, beaten, 2 tsp vanilla extract

For the filling: 2 oz butter, 4 oz caster sugar, grated zest 3 lemons

For the topping: 3 oz cream cheese, 2 oz icing sugar, 1 tbsp lemon juice, grated zest 1 lemon, 1 tbsp milk

Grease and flour a 2 lb loaf tin. Mix milk, water, salt, 1 tsp of the sugar and yeast and leave to foam about 30 mins. Mix flour and remaining sugar. Melt butter and add to the flour with the yeast mix, eggs and vanilla. Mix to a dough and knead about 5 mins until smooth. Place in a floured bowl, cover with cling film and leave in a warm place until doubled, about 45 mins.
In this time you can make the filling. melt the butter and stir in sugar and lemon zest.
Gently knock the dough back and roll out until about 12x15 inches, then cut into 4 equal strips. Paint them with the lemon sugar filling and carefully stack on top of each other, then cut them into 6 squares. Lift each stack and place into the loaf tin cut side up. Place each stack in the tin to fill it up, packing together like a sliced loaf. Wrap in cling film and leave to rise about 40 mins. Preheat the oven 325degF and bake 35 mins until golden. Cool slightly and make the topping by just beating it all together.Spread over the loaf and decorate with more lemon zest if you like.

I hope that description explains the cut-up dough clearly. The recipe was quite time-consuming and had a few different steps in but I wouldn't call it difficult. If you try it, I'd love to hear how you get on!

PS the blueberry loaf was exactly the same but the filling was 2 oz butter, 4 oz soft light brown sugar and 7 oz blueberries. I haven't tried that one though :)

Jun 13, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Suggestions on New Baking Project

I *think* it's not the same as 'pull apart' bread which I've always used to mean items where you bake individual portions pushed together in the tin, so they are joined when baked put can be separated into individual portions for each diner. My loaf wasn't separated out again but cut into slices each containing sections of the folded strips. If you see what I mean!!??

Jun 13, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Suggestions on New Baking Project

I've also been having a yeast-baking session lately, and made chocolate-and-nut filled chelsea buns topped with cream-cheese glaze only yesterday.

One thing I made recently, which you might like to try as it was quite unusual, came from the Hummingbird Cafe cookbook. It was a lemon loaf made with sweet yeast dough, but after making the dough you cut it into strips, painted each one with lemon filling and then kind of folded them together into the loaf tin. When it came out, it was a loaf shape but each slice had a nice variation of consistency and the lemon flavour went all down through the slice; this made a great change from the loaf being 'solid' all the way down through. I've never seen this done before and it was great! I could post the recipe when I get home if you're interested. IIRC there might be a similar blueberry one. Good luck with the kringle and the tea ring!

Jun 13, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Your favorite recipes that use ground almonds?

No problem, tweetie - it works every time and is so delicious with custard (out of a tin in my case, I must admit!)

BAKEWELL TART

PASTRY
5 oz plain flour
3 oz butter, diced
1 oz caster sugar
1 egg yolk (save the white to brush the pastry with)

FILLING
4 good tbsp raspberry jam
6 oz butter
6 oz caster sugar
6 oz ground almonds
3 eggs, beaten
zest 1 lemon

TO DECORATE
2 tbsp flaked almonds

Make the pastry by whizzing the flour, butter and sugar in a food processor briefly until the crumb stage, then whizz in the egg yolk and 1 tsp water until it comes together. Wrap and chill 30 mins-1 hr. Roll out thinly, use to line a 9 inch flan tin, prick with a fork and chill 20 mins. Line with baking parchment, fill with baking beans and bake blind 20 mins 180 degC. Remove baking beans, brush with egg white and return to oven 2 mins.
Spread the jam evenly over the pastry case. Beat together the butter and sugar for the filling until creamy, then beat in lemon zest, almonds and eggs. Spread over the jam, sprinkle over flaked almonds and bake 15-20 mins until golden and set. Serve warm or room temp. Yummy!

May 10, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

RHUBARB IS IN SEASON

Stew some rhubarb gently with a little sugar if you like, then layer it with broken ginger biscuits and plain yoghurt. Rhubarb and ginger go brilliantly together and this is a great mix of sweet/tart flavours and crunchy/soft textures too.

May 08, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Your favorite recipes that use ground almonds?

I love ground almonds and use loads of them - but they are very expensive here!

Our absolute favourites are bakewell tart and a flourless very dark chocolate cake. I could post recipes if you're interested. My recipe book from the Two Fat Ladies has an old recipe (they call it a 'receipt', very old fashioned usage!) for a chocolate-filled tart in which the base/pastry is made from ground almonds and egg white. I've never seen that anywhere else and it does taste delicious.

Apr 30, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Inexpensive, delicious and not melty fundraiser treats to make in advance

flapjacks are always a winner and are very easy and cheap to make in bulk - and are unaffected by all but the most boiling weather. My family's favourite have ginger in to make them more interesting; raisins and/or coconut and/or cherries make good additions. They have the bonus of being easy to eat whilst walking around.

You could also make cheese straws (I cheat and use bought puff pastry which makes them very quick to do). Tied together with some raffia in, say, threes would be attractive.

How about traditional butter shortbread too?

Home-made lemonade is easy to do as a beverage, which people always think is impressive and a nice change from shop-bought fizzy; lots of lemons and bags of sugar is not expensive and you could ladle it on the spot into paper cups and add a colourful straw.

Apr 16, 2013
flashria in Home Cooking

Tell me about lamb, please?

Hi reptilegrrl
Here in the UK lamb seems to be much more commonly eaten than it is in at least some parts of the US (only from what I've gathered here on Chowhound threads); it doesn't have the 'wariness' factor it appears to have for some people I've read about on here. Here, it's very much a staple food alongside chicken, pork and beef (it's a standard British roast dinner, for example) although it is getting really expensive - so I don't think you particularly need to anticipate that it won't be to your taste.

I think I respectfully disagree with ZoeLouise about cuts to try first; I think a lamb shank would fit the bill to start off with because it's easy to deal with, (just comes as one piece), is the right size for one, and if you braise it for a couple of hours it will fall off the bone so won't be hard to chew or dry. I braise mine in a lidded casserole dish in red wine, tinned tomatoes and rosemary very gently for as long as four hours (time consuming but very easy and hassle-free). Lamb is also very good in a curry or a moroccan dish: I use neck fillet for that which goes very tender - although of course the strong flavours will mean you won't get the 'pure' lamb taste. You may think that's a good thing or you may not! Good luck with it anyway, let us know how you get on.

Nov 19, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

WEIRD SANDWICH SPREADS

When I saw these recipes I immediately thought of something I used to make a few years ago that was retro even then - it's called 'liptauer' and is Hungarian in origin.

Having looked at my recipe I see it's not exactly the same as mine calls for caraway seeds and paprika, but the result, I guess, would have similar savoury overtones with quite strong flavours mixed in with the cheese - and maybe comes from the same original roots? Either way, it's surprisingly tasty as a snack. Try it and see! Also you could look at Nigella's link below.
http://www.google.co.uk/#hl=en&ou...

Sep 26, 2012
flashria in General Topics

Uses of corn flour???

Wow! who knew?.....well, you did, obviously :)).....the OP clearly can't thicken sauces with polenta! the idiosyncrasies of language, eh?

Sep 21, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Uses of corn flour???

hmmm, maybe.....either way, it's clearly labelled as 'cornflour' on my box - is that not what the OP meant? do you think it's something different then?

Sep 21, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Uses of corn flour???

The only thing I've ever used it for is for thickening sauces, when it really is invaluable. If you've made a stew or similar where the cooking liquid is still very liquid and too runny to put on a plate, remove a big spoonful to a small bowl and mix thoroughly with a heaped tsp of cornflour. when you put the mixture back into the stew and heat through your sauce will thicken magically.
I'm interested to hear the other uses mentioned below as I've never really seen it used for anything other than thickening - hence one packet has lasted me several months in the cupboard!

Sep 21, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

The Parsnip Challenge

I also am not keen on the way that parsnips are sweet when somehow you think they ought to be savoury. Making a curried parsnip soup really does turn that sweetness into a good base for the other flavours, making it seem much less obvious and obtrusive.

Here's the recipe I use:
Soften an onion and a garlic clove in butter. Stir in 1 tsp cumin and 1 tsp coriander and cook 1 min. Add about 1lb peeled, sliced parsnips and stir well, then add 2 tsp medium curry paste (or to taste). Add 3/4 pt stock and simmer 15 mins until parsnips are tender. Then blend with a stick blender until smooth and add 3/4 pt milk. Heat through and add 2 tbsp sour cream or yoghurt and a squeeze of lemon juice. Season and top with a swirl of yoghurt and chopped coriander leaves if liked; good served with naan bread.

As you say, this is really cheap to make but very tasty and satisfying.

Sep 21, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

The Parsnip Challenge

Their sweetness goes amazingly well in soup with curry flavours. You can use any combination of curry-type spices that you like or have handy, or just add a dollop of good-quality tandoori curry paste or similar. IMHO this is by far the best use for parsnips which I agree can be very uninspiring.

Sep 21, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Cullen Skink Anyone? Unappetizing and strange foreign food names!!

cullen skink is soup with smoked haddock in......

Sep 04, 2012
flashria in Not About Food

Help me like green bell peppers

Ratatouille.

Jul 20, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

What's your best pork tenderloin recipe you can share with me?

my favourite thing to do is rather a hassle, only do it when you've plenty of time and don't mind some fussing about...but it's really worth it as it's a delicious and unusual combination of flavours: slit the tenderloin lengthways, but not all the way down, then open it out like a book. Down the middle place some prunes you've soaked in brandy, some sausagemeat and some wilted spinach leaves. Bring the sides together and tie in several places with string. Brown in butter in a pan, cover and bake at 180 deg for 40 mins. Serve in a red wine sauce thickened with a beurre manie. Quite rich and only for special occasions maybe! but will get you praise:)

Jul 20, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Sifting brown sugar for cookies

+1. Never sifted brown sugar, can't imagine it would ever go through any sieve I possess....the most I'd do to it is squash it with the back of a spoon if there were visible lumps.

Jul 20, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

An Olympic Challenge

any of the suggestions so far encapsulate what's thought of as 'traditional English' food; good and solid and not particularly creative - delicious but a bit heavy and not what you'd call subtle! I must admit I've never really heard of a London broil though.....

You could go with a ploughman's, which you can still find a variation of in many pubs and has the benefit of being much better quality depending on the produce you buy. So if you get some really good quality crusty bread, tasty Cheddar or stilton (or both) and some really fresh salad, it is a meal well worth having (don't forget the pickled onion).

However, what no one's said yet is that curry is now our national dish according to many sources! So that's definitely an option - you need to pick one that's not-terribly-authentic such as chicken tikka masala or balti, which I gather doesn't much resemble anything anyone eats in any part of India, but is something that most of the british population would recognise and eats regularly. according to the BBC it's even spreading back to India now....

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/503680.stm

Jul 13, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Unrefrigerated Cheeses Left Out for a Week or so?

NO, NO!!! don't get rid of any of the cheese! It'll be great! Cheddar lasts basically 'forever'. cheese was around long before refrigeration! The semi-soft could probably do with eating now as it'll get unmanageable but will still be delicious.

(I probably would get rid of the butter as it's a different thing altogether and sounds as if it is now a bit yucky.)

Jul 12, 2012
flashria in Cheese

how to roast a juicy and tender silverside

what a shame, lemony, how disappointing...what will you/did you do with the tough meat? just brave it in a sandwich and do lots of chewing? or did you have a really clever plan b?

Jul 11, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

how to roast a juicy and tender silverside

that's interesting, I'm glad it's not just me! I've never cooked a rib of beef but perhaps I ought to experiment with that next time... I think I'm a bit intimidated by the bone, although I don't know why as I always cook lamb bone-in..I'll give it a go for a change when I'm next at a proper butcher's.

Jul 11, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

how to roast a juicy and tender silverside

I always feel very suspicious when I see that supermarkets have started to label silverside as as a 'roasting joint' (I am in the UK too) because IME it is too tough and stringy to be good. I think you'll have extra problems because your joint is so small it's hard to keep the middle pink. HOWEVER, I did recently have an interesting conversation with the butcher in my local Sainsbury's about this very topic because of the extortionate cost of topside, and he said that he would always pick silverside to roast but the mistake everyone makes is to try to roast it uncovered. He said that's what everyone's mums used to do, so everyone still tries to, but now beef is produced so fatless it just dries out in an instant. He said he would put some liquid in the roasting tray and cover it with foil, and cook it on a lowish heat like 180deg. Having said all that I bottled it and didn't do it though! so this advice may be useless......
I have had a lot of success with this Jamie recipe though, including the resting which I never believed could make a difference but actually does. I always add a slosh of wine into the veg, too. It also specifies topside but maybe you could try it with your joint....

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/be...

I'd be interested to hear how you get on because uninspiring roast beef is an enduring problem of mine too.

Jul 11, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

Sardines

I love tinned sardines although I don't disagree with you that the appearance isn't the best thing about them! I often have them just as you say, fork-mashed on toast, but find that a sliced raw tomato on top turns it into something really yummy - and also hides the fish itself which you may think a good thing! On a similar note, as a more substantial meal I would suggest lightly toasting some crusty bread like a split panini (sp - panino?), spreading with pesto, mashing sardines on top, then covering with tomato slices and grated cheese which you then grill until melted. Really tasty!

Tinned sardines also make a great pate when mashed up with some butter, some cream cheese, the juice of a lemon and a spoonful of mustard. As you say, useful storecupboard ingredients....looks aren't everything!

Jun 28, 2012
flashria in Home Cooking

"Water Weight"

I've had a kind-of-related curious question also forever - can anyone give me an opinion please?

If I am given a box of chocolates, and it's highly likely that I'll end up eating them all myself (however much I pretend otherwise), does it make any difference to my ultimate weight gain whether I eat the whole box at once (= one instance of overeating) and then go back to my reasonably restrained usual diet, or whether I eat one choc each day for the next 20 days (blowing my restraint out of the window on many occasions but only by a tiny bit each time)? I'd love to know the answer to that......

Jun 01, 2012
flashria in Not About Food