e

edub's Profile

Title Last Reply

critique my food choices in wine country

Awesome! I think I have to make this a reality!

about 5 hours ago
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

critique my food choices in wine country

Thank you all for your replies! Upon considering the wealth of top notch eats in Glen Ellen, we're actually thinking of staying there for one or two nights instead of Petaluma. What would be top choices there - Glen Ellen Inn/Fig Cafe/Olive and Vine? And any good bakeries or place for picnic supplies?

about 6 hours ago
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

critique my food choices in wine country

Hi Chowhounds,

I would love some help with the food portion of my itinerary (Wed July 16-Sat July 19). I've pored over previous posts but still have questions!

The first day (not even a half day), we have a 5pm reservation at the Mayo Family tasting room. I haven't seen a recent Chowhound review. Can anyone give me feedback?

We also have a 7:45pm at Glen Ellen Star. I was under the impression that Mayo wasn't really a lot of food - would it be overkill to do Mayo as appetizer and Glen Ellen Star as dinner? And is Glen Ellen Star all that?

We are staying in Petaluna, so breakfasts will probably be from Della Fattore and other bakeries, except that one day we'll venture to El Molino for chilaquiles (we are addicts). Has anyone been there for breakfast? Most lunches will be picnics we bring with us from Petaluma, or something quick we procure on the way. The one exception is the first day, when we'll be coming through Napa, and I'd like to stop at Oxbow. I was thinking the arepas place for lunch, would welcome thoughts.

We end our first day at Scribe, so was thinking about a 6:30pm at Girl and the Fig. Is it still top-notch, or are there other better places in Sonoma town? I adore figs but from what I see on the menu it doesn't appear I'm guaranteed them. Would welcome thoughts on the Sonoma night dinner.

Friday night we were planning on Central Market, so we could stay local to our hotel. Reviews seem to be great. Are we missing anything else in Petaluma? (I want to pick up a sandwich with Dutch crunch bread somewhere along the way too).

Saturday is our Healdsburg/rose day. If we are up early might do Healdsburg shed for breakfast but haven't seen many reviews. We want to hit Quivira, Mauritson, and MacPhail. Any good lunch options along the way?

We are taking the redeye out of SFO Saturday night, so for dinner I was thinking Picco in Larkspur (based on the raves I've read on Chowhound). Would that leave us with full tummies and happy memories before heading back East?

I really welcome other suggestions and alternatives. We went to Ad Hoc 7 years ago and had one of the most memorable meals ever, but everything I've read suggests that it's gone downhill (and for some reason that extra fifth course they offer seems to throw the simplicity of the menu off). But you wouldn't have to work too hard to change my mind. Other delicious options welcomed! Thanks.

Jul 07, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

What really happens at a restaurant when the customer can't pay?

This brought back a memory for me: my first time traveling by myself, during grad school, to Paris. It was on the heels of a devastating breakup and I felt very brave spending a weekend alone in a foreign country, using my rusty French. I wanted to eat duck and wandered around one night til I found a place, sat down with my book and enjoyed a three course meal. When the check came I reached into my bag and panicked - my wallet wasnt there, I had left it a the hotel. I explained that I was going back to get it to a dubious waiter (and I suspect the panic diminished my language skills). I rushed back, grabbed it, went back and paid, then slinked off into thenight. Only later did I realize that in my panic I had left no tip, and I was mortified. I imagined them cursing La Stupide Americaine in my wake. I still think about thatight, wishing I could go back and pay the tip, but knowing I have no idea whatsoever where the restaurant was. But I do remember that the duck was delicious.

Jun 29, 2014
edub in Not About Food

Best fresh fish markets in DC, pref. NW?

I wanted revisit this thread from nearly 7 years ago - any new good places for fish in DC/Bethesda/MontCo? I recently bought salmon at Great Wall in Rockville and it was outstanding. I don't know if it was farmed, but it was a great price ($8/lb) and looked and tasted pristine.

Any other places to buy fresh fish? I've got BlackSalt on my list and A&H when it reopens. Whole Food strikes me as crazy expensive (though they have sockeye on sale today only, for something like $13/pound.

Jun 27, 2014
edub in Washington DC & Baltimore

gooseberries and other fruits

Has anyone seen gooseberries, red and white currants or other less popular fruits in farmers markets or stores yet this year? Bonus points for cloudberries!

Jun 24, 2014
edub in Washington DC & Baltimore

Specific wine itinerary questions - I've done research!

I'm not - it was a joke. I think they're the most maligned winery on this board. Thanks for the Heitz tip!

May 26, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

Specific wine itinerary questions - I've done research!

Interesting - we don't really know that much about the stages of wine making. There's one particular Pinot we order every year and when we reached out the winemaker that's what he suggested. We'd be happy just to shake his hand and drink a glass with him!

May 26, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

Specific wine itinerary questions - I've done research!

Thanks - just looked at MacPhail's website and am intrigued. Definitely going to check it out!

May 26, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

Specific wine itinerary questions - I've done research!

Thanks SFDude - I checked and they both do roses. Thanks for the Sanglier tip. Re: Bistro Ralph - do you prefer it to Scopa? We have just one dinner in Healdsburg. Thanks much!

May 26, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

Specific wine itinerary questions - I've done research!

I've read countless threads over the past few days, and now would appreciate specific advice on my proposed itinerary. I have three days, and I am considering whether to change it around (possibly making it busier) by spending the majority of one day on Spring Mountain, per your powerful recommendations. We love pinot and quaff rose like water during our long hot spring and summers, but in addition to those we'd love to learn more about other varietals. Also love a good cava/sparkler (we did Schramsberg on a previous visit). Propensity towards smaller producers when possible.

Wed night: coming up from San Fran around 4-5pm - too late for tastings. We are tentatively staying in Healdsburg and would like to check out the Wednesday wine maker dinner at Scopa (winemaker for our week is not posted yet).

Thursday the plan was Dry Creek Valley. I'm leaning towards a couple of producers that are close to each other where we can taste roses and red zins - was thinking Quivira, Mounts, Mauriston. Appreciate additional suggestions especially for good roses.

The rest of the day is open - we just need to make our way back to Napa where we're staying. I was thinking about hitting one or two tasting rooms in Sonoma - Patz and Hall was one.

We are actually huge foodies but this is one trip where we're willing to play it fast and loose because the wine comes first. I'm sure we'll do Ad Hoc one night, and fried chicken at Addendum another time. We're too poor for French Laundry and ate at Redd last time. Is there a moderate dining experience that we shouldn't miss? We can probably be happy with arepas from Oxbow and other non-sit downs if the food is good enough.

We have a barrel tasting the next day (Friday) near Stag's Leap at 11am. Originally we were going to go to Carneros that day, but I am wondering if we should spend the day or most of it at Spring Mountain. I'd like to try Paloma, Pride Mtn, and Smith Madrone - I find the idea of tasting a lot of different varietals from small producers appealing, and If the scenery is really gorgeous, that would be a big plus. And we could hit V. Sattui on the way back - bonus.

If we do Pride Mtn et al, that only leaves us Saturday for Carneros. I would really really like to do Saintsbury, Adastra, and diRosa for an art break. I'm also a sucker for international festivals, and I see Gloria Ferrer is having a Catalan Festival that day. Has anyone been and cares to comment? I know their wines are not favorites on this board, but I'm curious if the food is good - there's a lot to be said for plentiful sparkling wine, good eats, and Spanish music and dancing. We have a 10:50p red eye out of SF.

The current Saturday itinerary with the festival puts a lot of pressure on our last day, so I'm still unsure about spending Friday at spring mtn rather than doing Carneros in two days. Change my mind?

Thanks!

May 26, 2014
edub in San Francisco Bay Area

toqueville v Italian

Sadly, I can't report on how the food was: we decided on Del Posto, but I ended up being very ill with a nasty virus and unable to eat (I can attest first hand that the toilets and bathrooms are clean!) My husband hurried through a few courses - octopus and chickpeas, which he liked; 100 layer lasagna, which he said was "very good" but overhyped; and a Flinstonian veal chop. Under those conditions, I think it's hard to judge the food, because you're not eating in a relaxed manner.

I will make these comments about the decor and service: it feels like you're in a huge cruise ship dining hall, with the wide staircase and the circular upper level balconies perching over the lower level. It's quite nice for that kind of thing, but not our style. On the service: waiters were *everywhere*. I couldn't get over it. Often two or three fussing over a single table. You never didn't see waiters. And yet, we had to ask twice for a ginger ale, which our waiter informed us was in the "queue" (note: it was a bottle of Canada Dry). Very slow even though we let the waiter know I was sick and we wanted to make it a quick meal.

All in all, we might consider going back for the tasting experience; but we are still blown away by the meal we had at Babbo's two and a half years ago and the charming atmosphere there. I'd probably plan our next celebratory New York Italian meal there, with Lincoln as a back up.

Thanks for everyone's inputs!

Nov 27, 2013
edub in Manhattan

toqueville v Italian

Thanks everyone for the recs! Lincoln sounds wonderful, putting it on the list for next trip. Del Posto is perfect because we are staying in the neighborhood, can take a nighttime stroll on the high line, and the 100 layer lasagna will be divine - lasagna is hub's favorite. The five course tasting strikes me as not unreasonable at $126 - but is the wine tasting ($155) only available with the 8 course captain's tasting? That price point to accompany a five course tasting would be extravagant.

Nov 19, 2013
edub in Manhattan

toqueville v Italian

No reservations via Open Table - I will try calling. I am not opposed to the price at Del Posto if it's totally worth it - thoughts? Do you recommend one over the other? We had a tremendous birthday dinner a few years ago at Babbo and it's still our standard.

Nov 18, 2013
edub in Manhattan

toqueville v Italian

I have birthday dinner reservations for my husband this Thursday eve at Toqueville but I'm getting cold feet; my husband really likes food with Asian influences, but he LOVES Italian. What's a hidden gem special occasion Italian we could check out? I was thinking about Maialino but no reservations available. Thanks!

Nov 18, 2013
edub in Manhattan

weekend cooking projects

I meant rest. The recipe (from a recent Bon Appetit) called for letting it rest while tightly wrapped in plastic for 1 hour.

I'd even be open to something multi-day - for Indian, maybe making a chutney on a Thursday night, doing naan bread on Friday night, and making the main curry on Saturday night ... I want it to be "event" cooking even if it's just for the two of us. Our kids certainly won't eat it so it's one meal all week that will be all about us!

Nov 04, 2013
edub in Home Cooking

weekend cooking projects

I wanted to revive this almost 10 year old thread! My husband and I made orecchiette this weekend and loved it -- it was so fun and satisfying to make, and yet very simple and rustic. What we needed was the time of a Saturday afternoon/early evening to knead the dough, let it rise, form pasta by hand, while slowly simmering bolognese sauce. Does anyone have ideas for future projects to share?

Nov 04, 2013
edub in Home Cooking

VietFest?

Has anyone been in past years? Trying to decide if the food is worth the trip. I can't get any menu or food booth info on the website.

Aug 22, 2013
edub in Washington DC & Baltimore

Trip report June 12-16, Part I

Sorry for the delay in posting. Thanks to the wonderful folks who provided me with insight and last minute information as we rushed to our "appointments." Now, back in the real world of making mac and cheese, going to work and counting calories, it's almost painful to write this, but I will do my best.

We went straight from the airport to the Windmill location of Bachi Burger. We were really, truly hungry and our first few bites of burger were absolutely sublime. My husband's Miyagi-san, in particular, had the most perfectly fried onion ring whose crunch contrasted with the beef and various ingredients and sauces. But after a few minutes, my husband said, It's just too rich - and that really encapsulated the burgers. My Ronin burger had a myriad of truly lux and rich ingredients -beef, fried egg, caramelized onions, two sauces (miso and a yuzu aoli, coleslaw - that none of them really could shine. The truffle fries were good. I'd never tried banana ketchup and liked it; husband liked the aioli it was meant to go with. Pickles were also a fun starter with six different kinds including whole garlic cloves and what I believe was burdock (very yum). I'd definitely go back, probably pick (maybe customize) a burger to share, and get some of the bao buns for variety. Still, a fun place the likes of which we don't have on the East Coast.

Our dinner that evening was at The Barrymore. Actually, I'd hoped we'd go for happy hour half price apps, but that didn't work out, so we kept our 7pm reservations. We liked getting off the Strip and going to a good to very good steakhouse without paying exorbitant strip prices. The octopus starter was really nice - we liked that the patatas bravas, which obviously stand alone as a dish (we have Jaleo here in DC and these were as good as theirs) really complemented and augmented the octopus in texture and in flavor. I had a kale salad - good - with bites of my husbands rib eye - great - and a side of creamed corn with lobster - not so good; the flavor was great when hot, but as I searched in vain for pieces of lobster, the cream of the corn also started to congeal, and it really wasn't all that tasty after the first few bites. And for $13 I expect at least a *little* lobster. My husband's ribeye was good but fatty, as I suppose that cut tends to be. We skipped dessert but enjoyed the free macarons. The atmosphere is fun, retro, cozy for a steakhouse. It would be great for a cheaper alternative to an on-the-strip bachelor party or group dinner. I'd go back for half price apps - the patio is quite cute, and the view of the parking lot effectively blocked - but probably not for dinner.

We had a virtuous breakfast in anticipation of LOS, where we showed up around noon to a half empty dining room that was packed when we left. Inevitably, starting with the nam kao tod leaves you with little direction to go but down. It is just so good. It's just so flavorful! As we were finishing it we were already plotting to get an order to go. We also got the green chili dip, which we'd never gotten before, and enjoyed it quite a lot.

Here's where things got hairy. We had ordered things at a 4 spice level, and when we ordered our main course - after a LOT of debate, sea bass on drunken noodles, and crispy duck on chili mint leaves - he asked us what level of spice. We said, 5 - 4 had been tolerable and we really like spicy spicy food, especially since we rarely have it at home because of our toddler eaters. In anticipation of the spiciness, and because the list is so celebrated, I got a glass of Riesling, the JJ Plum Kabinett. I don't normally care for Rieslings though admittedly have drunk them indiscriminately; the wine was really, really lovely and balanced, and a powerhouse when eaten with the few remaining bites of the green chile dip. I savored enjoying the rest of it with the main courses.

When they arrived, the sea bass was truly delicious - and heatless. I could have easily served it to my kids. I'd never had any kind of fish on drunken noodles, and the frying and the flavors were brilliant, but the lack of heat was breathtaking, and not in the good way that spicy food is. We debated with each other: did he not hear us? Didn't we clearly say, did we get a four for the appetizers? Because we'd like it a little spicier. Did he not believe us because of our extreme whiteness and obvious tourist-ness? By the time we realized it, we were halfway through the dish and the waiter was so hard to track down, we didn't feel it worthwhile to send it back. The duck was equally unspicy. We were underwhelmed with it. The duck was actually a little mealy-tasting in some parts. The sauce was probably the wrong choice (I KNOW that Dave Feldman and others sang the praises of the cognac sauce but it just sounded so rich for a warm day.) I found it was improved when I really pressed it into the sauce to saturate it with flavor. It wasn't terrible, but not anything I'd ever order again, even at appropriate heat levels. The sea bass I'd eat either way - it was still really delicious - but my lovely mid-day Riesling indulgence was wasted on the unspicy food.

Bonus points to the waiter for being honest with us - when we attempted to order the nam kao tod to go and asked if it would be good later, he told us it truly wouldn't, that it would be soggy by then (which is when it dawned on me that part of the reason it's so good is that it's so fried). We had loved the idea of eating it late night with a cold beer.

My verdict on LOS after this second trip: we probably will go whenever we are in Vegas when we have a rental car; but in a lot of ways, it's only a truly special experience if you are a local, who can pop in once a week; or if you have a large enough party to appreciate the breadth of dishes offered. If they make a mistake (kind of a big one in our case, I'd say) with one or two of your few dishes, it's harder to appreciate the restaurant as special. I've now done my research into nao k t and seeing that it's offered in a Laotian restaurant and Northern Virginia and sometimes at the esteemed Little Serow, which we haven't visited yet, I am somewhat less saddenned not to live in the same town as LOS.

That evening: Raku. Certainly one of the highlights of the trips with one or two special standouts. We loved the cold appetizers: the creamy tofu was truly game-changing, especially for someone like my husband who has only despised tofu his whole life. I had done a bit too much reading for my own good and all the talk about its textural similarity to burrata had me jonesing, without realizing it, for actual burrata, so that I was slightly let down by the first bite or two. But we loved the element of adding ingredients, especially the green tea salt, and then the green onions, bonito and soy sauce. I loved also getting that level of direction from the wait staff (basically, direction to do it yourself and mix it up). I also loved the sparse but warm elements on the table - the four condiment jars lined up just so with information beneath the jars; the soy sauce canter that let out just a drop or two at a time (where can I get that for my house!) Really special and different from the izakayas we've tried here.

The kampachi was my favorite of the night, one of my favorite bites of the trip. I can't really describe it - so fresh that it's sweet, creamy and pristine - I could have eaten it steadily for an hour in between sips of beer. I could have eaten nothing else. Also from the specials, the corn cob with mashed potato center - very good. More visually alluring than delicious if you were to measure the two against each other, but also very good.

From the grill we had the iberico pork: I broke my rule of no pork to try a chunk (when in Vegas!) It was scrumptious. Husband loved both but preferred the steak with Wagyu, was was very good but less primal and juicy than the pork. We got a whole eggplant, which I enjoyed, husband didn't care for; I liked it loaded with bonito shavings. While I hadn't loved them on the tofu, I came to enjoy their chewy, almost Parmesan-like flavor.

I could be forgetting something - I know we decided against the green tea soba because it was more than we could eat (we were still pretty full from LOS lunch). It was all excellent. We will definitely, for sure, return again next time.

Next up: poke lunch, appetizer crawl, Le Cirque and what I did for love (hint: sandwiches.)

Jun 23, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Thanks Dsve and QAW. Will write up LOS and full trip Monday - we had a sad snafu with spice levels that dragged down our experience.

Le cirque tonight - prob doing a la carte. Please suggest away! Ellenost, couldn't find your last trip report but would love to know what you had on your special degustation.

Jun 15, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Thanks! Favorite sauce for duck? How about the catfish salad?

Jun 13, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Dave - does crispy duck come w a specific sauce, like Penang? Going for lunch today - thinking duck over fish and khaki soi, maybe the off menu chicken dumplings w crispy rice. How's green papaya salad?

Jun 13, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Our trip is fast approaching! Does anyone want to share their favorite meals at Bachi and The Barrymore? I'm super interested in hearing about your most loved burgers at Bachi.

What do people love at the Barrymore? Has anyone been for happy hour when they have the great selection of discounted apps?

Based on reading the site, I'm thinking crispy duck and sea bass at LOS (probably crispy rice, which we had last time - husband is allergic to shrimp so the crispy shrimp is a no go). But would always welcome other recs. I'm all about being a glutton there and bringing back leftovers for late night eats. Also based on reading other threads, I'm thinking we will probably do a la carte at Raku, partially because of hubs' allergy; I know we'll do wasabi beef, fresh tofu, poached egg w urchin and check out the specials. Going to look more closely at Le Cirque and Kabuto choices when we get there but looking at doing set menus at both.

We might do a tacos el gordo lunch b/c we loved it last time. Any thoughts on China Poblano for a lunch or late night snack? Anything else outstanding for a lunch on the strip that I'm missing? We won't do Milos again - liked it fine but not love.

Thanks chowhounders!

Jun 07, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Thanks Zach! We are definitely keeping both Kobuto and Raku. What a wealth of different and exceptional Japanese restaurants you have in Vegas.

We did the lunch special at Milos last time -- it was quite good, but probably not enough to merit a return visit for us. I'm haven't heard much about Comme Ca, thanks for the suggestion!

And thanks for the happy hour list! Love Eater!

May 20, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Help me with my (Asian heavy) food itinerary

Hounds, please take a look and share your thoughts. We are in Vegas for four days and will have a car. Still, we want to do some drinking. At least two of these dinners are off strip, but thinking to eat on the early-ish side so we can do our drinking in pedestrian friendly areas. We are staying at MGM signature. My husband thinks it's a bit "Asian heavy" - but to me the three experiences are so diverse that it works. Appreciate thoughts!

Wed lunch - Bachi burger on way from airport
Wed dinner - reservations at The Barrymore (has anyone been to happy hour?) or, Lotus of Siam

Thu lunch - Lotus of Siam if not for dinner
Thu dinner - reservations at Raku

Fri lunch - ?? (take it easy by the pool)
Fri dinner - Le Cirque

Sat lunch - ??
Sat dinner - Kabuto

I feel we're missing a good Italian meal ... and we were also thinking of doing some happy hour eating for dinner and getting a late night snack if needed. I wish either Kabuto or Raku was open for lunch!! Is one of them missable?

Thanks friends!

May 17, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Sage?

We ate there on our trip last year and I remember not a thing that we ate. I put it on the list of places where we might stop by on this year's trip to have a bite in the lounge, but I doubt we'll do it. Our splurge meal is Le Cirque (per ellenost's recommendation!)

May 17, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

New restaurants sine June 2012

Making a second annual June trip - what's new and exciting since last year? Thanks!

Apr 27, 2013
edub in Las Vegas

Edge brunch

Is it worth it? $65 without cocktails or $80 with? Is it truly a food truck surrogate experience? (hard to believe at the Four Seasons). How isthe stone crab? Could you get your money's worth with fresh fruit, fresh seafood, and some choice entrees like short rib chilaquiles? I don't mind paying for top notch food, but I don't plan to gorge myself or eat overly decadent food just to get my monet's worth. But I'm intrigued by the concept and reports of top-notch ingredients.

Mar 09, 2013
edub in Miami - Fort Lauderdale

Corduroy

Does anyone know if they still do the $30 bar menu? Has anybody been lately and have any feedback on either the bar or the prix fixe?

Feb 28, 2013
edub in Washington DC & Baltimore

DGS Delicatessen in Dupont Circle - Report

Oy, aren't we all mispacha?

Seriously, though, I just caught wind of this place a week or two ago, and it reminded me of the restaurant concept that Sheldon had on Top Chef - refined, reimagined Filipino cuisine. Isn't that what they're doing - taking some of the homiest elements of a homey cuisine (Ashkenazit Jewish), and reimagining it with flavors and traditions of other branches of Jewish and American cuisine. Or like Raskia is to Indian (just about to post my review from there).

Feb 10, 2013
edub in Washington DC & Baltimore