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Best "not-so-well-known" Fine-Dining-Restaurants in Manhattan?

Probably Taboon.

Feb 03, 2014
wasny in Manhattan

seeking nice and quiet village restaurant rec

I'm unsure of what you mean by "nice" but here are two suggestions for quiet restaurants that might fit the bill:

•North Square, 103 Waverly Place in the Washington Square Hotel, doesn't seem to get a lot of attention but the food is good, not trendy or pretentious.

•El Charro, 4 Charles Street, is a quintessential Greenwich Village Spanish restaurant. It's been there forever; not too many like it are left.

Jan 06, 2014
wasny in Manhattan

help me use up my ajvar

Use it as a marinade for roasted meat or fish. Toss it with steamed vegetables and pasta or grains (qunoa, rice...).

Jan 06, 2014
wasny in Home Cooking
1

Mama Leone's

Well yes, but only two decades (it closed in 1994). And the original post in this thread is from only one decade after that generally unlamented event (2004).

Dec 25, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

looking for reasonably priced breakfast in a place with atmosphere near Times Square

You might enjoy Cafe Edison (aka the Polish Tea Room) in the Edison Hotel, 228 West 47th St., west of Broadway. You'll get good old-school New York atmosphere there.

Nov 26, 2013
wasny in Manhattan
1

Very Casual Italian Restaurant Suggestions for Sunday Evening

The OP doesn't specify "Red-sauce Italian-American" however. Anyway, Le Zie touts its spaghetti and meatballs, which fits pretty well into the red-sauce category. And that restaurant certainly serves pasta, calamari and salads, as also listed in the OP (I've never had veal there though that's not to say it's not on the menu). It's also a quite casual place where keeping the bill under $150 would be manageable.

Aug 02, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Very Casual Italian Restaurant Suggestions for Sunday Evening

Maybe someone can speak about Le Zie these days? I haven't been for a couple of years, but it could fit the bill.

Jul 31, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Yes, I haven't eaten there yet(and hopefully never).

What do you mean? Does Jesus hate fast food?

Jul 31, 2013
wasny in Chains
2

Best falafel in lower Manhattan?

Taim is very good. And they have a truck, so check their website for days and locations: http://www.taimmobile.com/

Their hummus is excellent too.

By the way, get the falafel sandwich "with everything" for the full experience.

Jul 27, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Don't Yum on My Yuck ™

Thanks for providing that first link. I'm sure my daughter (she's nine years old now) wouldn't want to give up any claim she may have on this intellectual property.

Jul 27, 2013
wasny in General Topics

Unusual restaurant requests - and responses

It sure does.

Jul 10, 2013
wasny in Not About Food

Unusual restaurant requests - and responses

This reminds me of the classic "hold the chicken" scene from Five Easy Pieces, with Jack Nicholson:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wtfNE...

Jul 10, 2013
wasny in Not About Food

Louro -- New David Santos Restaurant in West Village

I agree with your assessment of the meal. The chowder and the egg (the amaranth added a nice crunch) were great. The skate dish was the weak link, only because of temperature and plating problems--probably tough to serve that dish to so many diners at once. But it's a fun environment for sure.

Oh, and I wish dessert had incorporated sea urchin somehow. I can easily imagine uni custard or ice cream.

May 08, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Best place to buy beer in bulk in Manhattan

True about Flair's prices, and their selection is much more extensive than Costco's too.

The Patacon Pisao truck on 202nd near 10th Ave. is definitely worth a visit, for a sandwich that uses plantains instead of bread.

May 08, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Best place to buy beer in bulk in Manhattan

Flair Beverages probably has the best prices in the borough. Cash only.

3857 9th Avenue at 207th Street

May 04, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

Northwestern Famous 西北 at Columbia U - food truck

Sounds good. Is the truck on Broadway or Amsterdam?

May 03, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

West Village with in-laws and 2 kids....need dinner help!

I think Louro's a good choice, especially if your kids have broad palates, as you say. My 8-year-old has been a couple of times and claims to like it. I certainly like it a lot. Go early and you'll be fine. The food is really good, the staff is friendly, and the small plates will work well for small fry.

Mar 19, 2013
wasny in Manhattan

So I finally get the annoyance behind people calling anything a martini.

Like many words, "sex" has more than one definition. In the term "same-sex marriage" it means the biological state of being male or female, not sexual intercourse. And unless we're talking about grammar, gender usually refers to behavior and social roles, not sex organs and chromosomes, so "gender reassignment surgery" would be pretty difficult for a medical doctor to perform.

To keep the discussion vaguely food-related, some gender stereotypes: Ladies lunch in tea rooms, real men prefer steakhouses.

Mar 06, 2013
wasny in Not About Food

So I finally get the annoyance behind people calling anything a martini.

The gender/sex misunderstanding certainly is widespread. However, I think your "same gender marriage" complaint is off target. "Same-sex marriage" is the correct term. Gender is a social construct--societies have developed definitions of "masculine" and "feminine" behaviors--while sex is biology. Same-sex marriage is a union between two (biological) men or two (biological) women, but each individual can identify his or her gender as male, female, both or neither. We can think about the difference between cross-dressing and sex reassignment surgery to help clarify the confusion.

Mar 06, 2013
wasny in Not About Food
1

Sandwich in a Bathroom

Don't shit where you eat, literally.

Mar 01, 2013
wasny in Not About Food

So I finally get the annoyance behind people calling anything a martini.

I'm with linguafood on the "mic" abbreviation. Not that I expect you'll change your mind, but here's an interesting column on this very conundrum, which includes at the end a mention of the pronunciation problem: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/mag...

As far as the martini debate, Luis Bunuel, another late great bon vivant, preferred a dry martini. Check out this passage from his highly entertaining autobiography, My Last Sigh (I find the comparison of martini-making to the Immaculate Conception especially amusing):

'To provoke, or sustain, a reverie in a bar, you have to drink English gin, especially in the form of the dry martini. To be frank, given the primordial role in my life played by the dry martini, I think I really ought to give it at least a page. Like all cocktails, the martini, composed essentially of gin and a few drops of Noilly Prat, seems to have been an American invention. Connoisseurs who like their martinis very dry suggest simply allowing a ray of sunlight to shine through a bottle of Noilly Prat before it hits the bottle of gin. At a certain period in America it was said that the making of a dry martini should resemble the Immaculate Conception, for, as Saint Thomas Aquinas once noted, the generative power of the Holy Ghost pierced the Virgin’s hymen “like a ray of sunlight through a window-leaving it unbroken.”

‘Another crucial recommendation is that the ice be so cold and hard that it won’t melt, since nothing’s worse than a watery martini. For those who are still with me, let me give you my personal recipe, the fruit of long experimentation and guaranteed to produce perfect results. The day before your guests arrive, put all the ingredients-glasses, gin, and shaker-in the refrigerator. Use a thermometer to make sure the ice is about twenty degrees below zero (centigrade). Don’t take anything out until your friends arrive; then pour a few drops of Noilly Prat and half a demitasse spoon of Angostura bitters over the ice. Stir it, then pour it out, keeping only the ice, which retains a faint taste of both. Then pour straight gin over the ice, stir it again, and serve.

‘(During the 1940s, the director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York taught me a curious variation. Instead of Angostura, he used a dash of Pernod. Frankly, it seemed heretical to me, but apparently it was only a fad.)

Feb 28, 2013
wasny in Not About Food

On the more disturbing side of "entertainment" food consumption......(not for the weak stomach)

Most reputable sources conclude that eating the brains of live monkeys is an urban legend. And it's almost always a "friend of a friend" who reports attending such a sumptuous dinner. So don't let the brain-eating idea freak you out too much. There are plenty of real horrors in life (and food production) to worry about.

From an NPR interview with the director of that film you reference (http://www.onthemedia.org/2012/feb/24...

BROOKE GLADSTONE: And the two that Alex happened to mention, the eating of the monkey brains after clubbing the monkey to death at a restaurant, and the man in the electric chair, those were both faked scenes, right?

JOHN ALAN SCHWARTZ: Yeah, they are. And the thing that made the monkey so incredible is that we found a monkey trainer, and so all we did is we built this special table and rented a Moroccan restaurant and put some friends of ours around a table.

Jan 29, 2013
wasny in General Topics

Looking for great wine shop in Fairfield County, CT [Moved from Wine board]

Don't be too amazed. Saugatuck Grain and Grape didn't open until 2010, and the last post before yours on this thread was made in 2008.

Always good to have current suggestions, though. Thanks.

Dec 14, 2012
wasny in Southern New England

Space for reunion group to have drinks and visit in June

We had a family reunion early this summer at East of Eighth, on 23rd St. 60 people in a nice private room upstairs. Thirty dollars per person for hors d'oeuvres and one drink ticket (then cash bar). Also a Saturday afternoon, for three hours I believe. The food is mediocre, but good food isn't the point of these gatherings, is it?

Dec 10, 2012
wasny in Manhattan

Quinoa..now feel ill..

Quinoa's boring like rice is boring, or pasta is boring. It all depends on how you cook and eat it. Although the allergy issues make it more interesting in a broader sense....

And, sadly, I haven't seen it for close to two bucks a pound for several years.

Nov 04, 2012
wasny in General Topics

Kid Friendly for Foodie Parents

Zabb Elee for Thai. But don't limit yourself to Manhattan; Queens isn't far away and Sripraphai is very kid-friendly. And Flushing has a lot of interesting seafood opportunities--look on the Outer Boroughs board.

Nov 04, 2012
wasny in Manhattan

NH chowhound Q's: best deli for out of towners, dosa (and chow-worthy) near Times Square?

Oh, the Polish Tea Room is still good. Get the soup, enjoy the ambience.

As for the rest of the restaurants pilletsh mentioned: ...? Take the five-year-old to Sake Bar Hagi for an early meal at 5:30 PM and the cynical dad should smile a lot more than at some fake diner.

Oct 16, 2012
wasny in Manhattan

NH chowhound Q's: best deli for out of towners, dosa (and chow-worthy) near Times Square?

They make egg creams too.

Oct 03, 2012
wasny in Manhattan

What constitutes a "burger" and a "sandwich?"

You're asking Orson, correct?

Sep 29, 2012
wasny in General Topics

What constitutes a "burger" and a "sandwich?"

And a grilled frankfurter on a (burger) bun...?

Sep 29, 2012
wasny in General Topics