sweet100s's Profile

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My favorite things from HEB

3 cheers for the new HEB Organics line of products.

Its organic shredded cheese seems to be now $1 less than equivalent at Whole Foods.

Yet another reason to appreciate HEB.
http://www.businessinsider.com/h-e-b-is-americas-best-grocery-store-2014-3

They are also a good company to work for according to the purchasing analyst I went to MBA school with.

However, HEB:

1) Please refrain from constantly relocating my favorite 150 calorie fast breakfast - the Crepini breakfast crepes filled with blueberries and soft ricotta cheese.
http://crepini.com/product.aspx?productid=288&categoryid=12&productcode=B2C+8-93190-00217-2#.U0rcIfldUkY

In most HEBs they are now around the corner from the deli in the open refridgerated case. Or, if you must relocate them, please inform your team of their new location.

2) And on a more serious note, please stop adding Propylene Glycol to your store-made muffins.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/969788

Apr 13, 2014
sweet100s in Austin
1

Noble Pig Burnet

What is on their expanded breakfast menu?

Apr 13, 2014
sweet100s in Austin

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

argh.

So I guess it's organic-only for me.

Mar 24, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Goodness...

If I post other reviews, I'll carefully edit out all effusive comments, if I really enjoyed a restaurant that has not been mentioned by the regular contributors on this forum.

===

I wanted to try Eggs & Co, but they are not open till too late in the morning. The point of needing to eat breakfast at all was for the train days when traditional lunch between 12-2pm was NOT possible.

Oddly - when I go back and read your reply to the note where I originally asked about early morning breakfast near Cafe Flore, you said
re: Eggs & Co
" I've never had just breakfast there because the hours just don't work for me..."
but you did like the brunch.

Also, you said,

"Le Flore has a very good but expensive breakfast menu that will appeal to Anglo-Saxons."

Maybe our tastes are different. Though this doesn't confuse me. Different tastes just happen! I did not enjoy what I ordered for early morning breakfast at Cafe Le Flore at all. It seemed way overpriced for what I got, and tasted like it was not freshly made. However, the historical aspect of the cafe was enjoyable.

=== To repeat:

My focus was finding an EARLY MORNING BREAKFAST place, preferably more interesting than a hotel breakfast, near my hotel.

From my original question last November:

"We'll need several early morning breakfasts during our December trip to Paris.
"early" = 6am - 9am
Hotel location is across from Cafe de Flore in the 6'th arr."

My opinion is that the weekday quiche at Cafe Louise was definitely delicious, hot, and fluffy. Many times more delicious than what's available at Cafe Flore.

Whereas their Sunday brunch quiche I didn't enjoy as much - more dense and too much salmon for my taste as I stated above.

Do the other places you mention serve early morning breakfasts?

Mar 24, 2014
sweet100s in France

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

Just tried to figure out if the part about the German beer purity law was correct. It looks like it is.

So I need to either buy organic beer, buy German beer, or embark on a research project.

Made a quick trip to grocery store before I read websites below. (the wonderful Central Market, http://www.centralmarket.com/Home)

Saw beers labeled German beers, but didn't have time to look at the fine print to determine if they were
1) Labeled "German beers" but brewed outside of Germany, or
2) "actually brewed in Germany" beers that comply with that R_______ law."

================ References

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinheitsgebot
The Reinheitsgebot, literally "purity order", is a regulation concerning the production of beer in the Holy Roman Empire and its successor state, Germany. In the original text, the only ingredients that could be used in the production of beer were water, barley and hops.

[...
]In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz only concerns imported beer.

Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it.

[...]
The revised Vorläufiges Biergesetz of 1993 is a slightly expanded version of the Reinheitsgebot, allowing, besides water, malted barley, and hops, for yeast to be used for bottom-fermented beer, and for different kinds of malt, and sugar to be used for top-fermented beer.

From: http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/be...

"Rather, the significance of the Reinheitsgebot lies in the fact that German beer is all natural! It may not contain any chemicals, preservatives, or artificial process enhancers (such as artificial enzymes or yeast nutrients) nor may it contain any cheap and flavorless sources of starch (such as rice and corn). This means, a beer made in Germany is always a wholesome and flavorful product. It is the art and craft of the brewer that turns the Reinheitsgebot's simple and restrictive list of ingredients into a cornucopia of beer styles, from blond to black, from light to heavy."

"German brewers, however, still adhere fiercely to the Reinheitsgebot as a matter of pride and tradition. German beer labels and advertisements still proudly proclaim the purity of the local brew, and many a German imbiber would not think of letting anything but a "pure" beer pass his or her lips."

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch pastry table

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Suggestions menu board

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Inside menu

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Cafe Louise outside sign

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch sandwich wraps and more quiche

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch pastry selection

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch getting started

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

An uncommonly well-kept bathroom. Picture taken before the sunrise on a December morning when people were running in and out for espresso.

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch salmon quiche

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Sunday brunch. Gets busy after an hour, suggest reservations to avoid wait!

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Pretty interior for mornings

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

One bite of the croissant and I called to wake up hotel next door sleepyheads!

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Location...

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Cafe Louise sign near Hotel Au Manoir St. Germain des Pres

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Cafe Louise goat cheese and ham freshly made quiche

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Cafe Louise - a delicious early breakfast or brunch in the 6’th on St. Germain.

Part 4 of the Christmas in Paris trip report… At this rate I won’t finish before next Christmas.

So to remove the suspense:
Favorite meal of the entire trip, hands-down - Piroutte in the 1st
Most delicious budget meal - La Bastide d’Opio in the 6’th http://www.bistrot-opio.com/.
I read about Pirouette on John Talbot’s blog http://johntalbottsparis.typepad.com/ and Paris by Mouth http://parisbymouth.com/. I believe the La Bastide d’Opio came from here on Chowhound, maybe via Souphie?)

But this post is mostly about a place I completely enjoyed that I have not seen mentioned here on Chowhound or elsewhere.

Café Louise
http://www.cafe-louise.fr/
From their website:
Sunday to Wednesday: 7:00 to 2:00, Thursday to Saturday: 7:00 to 5:00
155 Boulevard Saint Germain, 75006 Paris
Tel. 01 42 22 88 98
Disclaimer: When traveling it’s always a good idea to call to double-check open / close times and any other expectations you might have, since things can change at whim despite what is written on signage or websites.

==============

Before reading more here and on TripAdvisor, I had this romantic notion of breakfast in Paris consisting of an assortment of light fluffy freshly baked quiches with a side arugula salad served by adorable yet stern waiters.

Then, I read that quiche would be difficult to find for a breakfast meal in Paris. Moreover, that early morning breakfast with eggs were not too common outside of a hotel breakfast (yawn).

However, for the 3-4 days when we had morning / late morning train trips, the itinerary left no time for lunch, I knew we’d need want a substantial breakfast EARLY morning 7am-9am-ish since our next real meal would be dinner. Substantial to me means eggs. Eggs stick to my ribs. If I have substantial breakfast with eggs early morning I can go without eating till 4:00pm. But I also wanted to find something special or at least different since this was our annual vacation. Not just what I always make at home (yogurt, granola, nuts, fruit). And something more interesting than hotel breakfast.

We stayed at the Hotel Au Manoir St. Germain des Pres in the 6’th mainly because of excellent Tripadvisor advice received that it was both a great location in the 6’th PLUS an ideal location for being immediately near multiple means of transportation: A taxi stand right in front of the hotel + buses + subway. We used them all depending on whatever would be fastest. It’s also right around the corner from a big Monoprix. Look for the big red apostrophe sign.

( I would recommend staying at Au Manoir to anyone as long as you bring your own travel router. Apparently the owner did not choose right with whoever installed their Wifi. Its sloggy slow. Worse, they transmit this obnoxiously loud video game advertisement as part of the initial challenge screen. However, unlike many hotels, Au Manoir still has WIRED ethernet ports. So you simply plug in a tiny travel router like the one I travel with:
http://www.amazon.com/Edimax-BR-6258n-150Mbps-Wireless-Broadband/dp/B005QD9CV4/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1395613550&sr=1-2&keywords=Edimax-BR-6258n
into the WIRED port. Then you have your own fast private hotel room WiFi network going in 1 minute. This makes planning the next day take 10 minutes vs 30 minutes including annoying time-outs when you’re dead tired at night.)

However, another key attribute of Hotel Au Manoir is that it is within 2 blocks of not one, not two, but THREE sources of early-morning (key being early morning) quiche and breakfast with eggs. The most delicious one I tried was Cafe Louise for breakfast and weekend brunch, located just 2 doors away from the hotel. With your back towards Café Flore, what you would see in this order on St. Germain after Emporio Armani Café is: Brasserie Lipp, Hotel Au Manoir, a jewelry store, Café Louise.

Café Flore
Had to try Café Flore just for the history of it. Their quiche definitely was NOT just made. It seemed re-heated and texture was too dense / hard.

Les Deux Magot
Quiche was also available early morning at Les Deux Magots but I didn’t try it, because by the time I saw it on the menu, I had already enjoyed to Café Louise quiche and staff.

Café Louise
I discovered Café Louise unintentionally one eeeeearly morning at 6am-ish when I woke up and couldn’t get back to sleep. So I decided to wander around St. Germain. I didn’t get very far. The door was open, chairs still mostly up, but I saw people going in and getting espresso which sounded like a fine idea.

What I enjoyed about Café Louise:
- Very pleasant interior for morning. Light Yellow – black/brown – white interior, natural stone, perfect to encourage waking up.
- Clean
- Cute and exceptionally nice servers.
- Good / very good coffee and espresso
- Delicious croissants and pastries

And the 2 biggies:

- Starting at 7am delicious hot fluffy quiche. Suggestion: Always call to double-check things,but 2 for 2 times, starting at 7am

- A diverse Sunday brunch, including THE best oven roasted chicken drumsticks I have ever tasted in my life.

The goat cheese & ham quiche at Café Louise during the week was especially delicious; tasted like it was just made. Well thought out flavor balance and crust. Sunday’s salmon quiche was a little strong on the smoked salmon taste for my liking.

At Café Louise when I arrived the first time at 6:30am-ish it was completely empty except for people getting espresso to go. At 7:15am-ish a couple families showed up for breakfast, as well as several people having a business breakfast. Sunday brunch requires reservations.

Other snippets of Christmas in Paris report:
Part 1
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/931355
Part 2
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/960451
Part 3
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/962857

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in France

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

RB Hound>> Not trying to go the beer snob route here, but why are you limiting yourself to "domestic light beers"?

Only because
- I stick to a 1400 calories/day budget for 3-4 days, and 2000 on the 4-5'th.
- It scopes the problem to solve to a narrower one.

Beer has an interesting complex taste to me (though I'd guess most here would consider my beer tastes wimpy.) Beer is a VERY welcome alternative after mostly water, milk, tea, coffee. I make my own roasted nut mixture with rosemary, garlic powder, italian seasoning, olive oil, salt and pepper, and my favorite raw unsalted almonds. It's a favorite with beer.

My favorite 2 beers are
- Alaskan Amber (181 calories)
- Sam Adams Light (At 120 calories per, it's probably the most caloric light, but the taste is the most interesting to me of all the lights.)

I wish I could remember the ingredient that makes me wince. I had a beer flight eons ago and really disliked a couple of them. The server said, "This means you don't like beers with a lot of ______ in them." Need to have another beer flight with a knowledgeable person around to remember :-).

The bad news is the calories.
The good news is the fine print in the bottom.
http://winefolly.com/update/calories-...

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

JessKidden,

Very informative links, thank you. That explains the rationale for why a beer maker would decide to include it:
>> STABILFOAM is a food grade propylene glycol alginate, specially developed and produced as foam stabilizer for beer. It gives to beer a more stable, longer-lived, creamier foam.

Another detail I meant to mention in first post -
I've read propylene glycol is on the list of things not allowed in baby products because it's a known skin irritant. So if you want to avoid it, buying baby shampoos and skin creams can shorten the grocery trip (reading each label takes time).

Also, if something has glycerin in it, that seems to be a substitute for the things propylene glycol does for hair/skin products, but it's a more expensive ingredient. So typically only the more expensive products will have it. But once you read see glycerin on the label, it's less likely the rest of the list will contain propylene glycol.

PS: If anyone reading this happens to be a dermatologist and would like to see a picture of what my reaction looked like at its worst, and suggest an alternate hypothesis for the diagnosis, I'm game. (I did take high res pics to document progression.) It literally felt like something was cooking my hands and feet from the inside.

The fire feeling stopped within 24 hours of removing propylene glycol from everything I touched. I guess my body just had enough of that chemical after a certain point.

Mar 23, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

Thanks for the link Jim.

From Mitch's response in the article >> I have heard of some beverages where small amounts glycol were added to add body or flavor, but I have not heard of this being done in beer.

Since the dermatologist only warned me to look for it in hair and skin products, I didn't think to look for it in food.

I also had never heard of it being in breakfast muffins, much less my favorite local Austin grocery store's (HEB) freshly-made blueberry muffins.

But there it was, propylene glycol, listed right there on the label, plain as day.

It's also listed as an ingredient in my (former) favorite ice cream sandwich (Skinny Cow Vanilla).

It's an interesting article, and it does present an impression that craft beers would likely not contain it.

Are there any domestic lite beers that do list their ingredients, so I can be sure it doesn't contain propylene glycol?

Mar 22, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

Does anyone happen to have already researched which domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

I have developed an allergy to propylene glycol. My reaction that I endured several years ago: the skin on the soles of feet and palms of hand turn into dinosaur skin. Skin gets thickened, then it cracks, bleeds and is very very itchy. It was so painful I started to think of ways that I could convince a doctor to amputate my feet and hands.

Took 9 trips to an uber-expensive dermatologist and diagnoses of psoriasis, ezcema, etc. Nothing helped. Then, I (yes, me, not the doctor) said, "What about an allergy test?" One allergy test + eliminating propylene glycol completely eliminated the problem. In 4 months, perfect skin.

Eliminating propylene glycol is not easy, It's in almost all skin and hair products unless they use the more expensive glycerin. I believe it's an ingredient used as a (what's the word...something that helps maintain the product's desired consistency?) I have seen dog food commercials on TV advertise they no longer put it in their dog food.

Recently, I started feeling the beginnings of the same problem in my feet. I couldn't imagine what it could be since I read every single label for all products I purchase.

Someone forwarded me a link to the Subway bread controversy. A few clicks later I see this:
http://foodbabe.com/tag/propylene-gly...
(ick - it's also an ingredient in antifreeze

)

Never realized beer could contain propylene glycol. I started drinking mostly lite domestic beers. This could definitely be the source of the problem.

2 of the solutions Ms. Foodbabe suggests I'll be doing in the meantime:
1) Buy organic beers
2) Buy german beers by law they can't have the extra crap in them
but those are probably so much more caloric. Even my favorite domestic lite beer, Sam Adams Light, has 120 calories per, last I checked.

Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone else in the world with adverse reactions to propylene glycol has already made all the phone calls or done the research needed to figure this out?

And if you happen to know of someone who was diagnosed with ezcema or psoriasis, do suggest they get an allergy test. Turns out, the ingredient I was allergic to was present in the $100/tube cream that I was prescribed!

Mar 22, 2014
sweet100s in Beer

Best risotto in Austin is at...

Soto, in Cedar Park.

http://sotoaustin.com/

I thought that the risotto part of the :
"O-Toro Sashimi on a bed of shaved truffle companied by creamy sushi rice risotto with wild mushroom"
http://sotoaustin.com/menu

would be iffy. Who would expect a Japanese restaurant to serve incredible risotto?

Should have known better. Everything I've tried at Soto meets my 2 criteria of what makes an ideal restaurant dish:
1) It's delicious.
2) It requires either more skill, more time, or more creativity than I possess.

especially that risotto. Even the way they sliced the sashimi complimented the risotto texture. More with soft edges than angular ones.

Here's the Austin Chronicle's Soto review:
http://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2...

Feb 27, 2014
sweet100s in Austin

Saturday Lunch?Brunch

Completely enjoyed the

Big Pig Sandwich
Braised pork butt, house-made pickles, smoked
onions, slaw, chipotle cider aioli $8
http://greenhousecraftfood.com/our-me...

at greenhouse craft food. More meat than the Noble Pig.

If you approach from I-35, it's easy to drive past it. It's in a small shopping center *before* the light.

Also, if you like sweet potato fries, they do have excellent sweet potato fries. Crisp and delicious.

Feb 27, 2014
sweet100s in Austin
1

Onion Rings

The problem with onion rings is
- Either the batter is too thick and separates from the onion
- Or they are too greasy

Feb 24, 2014
sweet100s in Austin

RIP VII

Ya gotta have extra caffeinated coffee to keep up with rudeboy.

Feb 13, 2014
sweet100s in Austin
1

Favorite train food, knives, mustards from Paris and Reims, Part 3

hychka, Those knives were on an upper floor of Le Bon Marche, in a display with many others like them in all different colors. The display was visible immediately upon exiting the escalator.

Price was low enough to not give me pause... maybe between 10 - 15 Euro.

I wish I bought the beautiful red handled one too. The other colors were too loud for me (purple !?!) , but the brown, vanilla, and red caught my eye.

Suggestion: Save that picture to your cell phone. Show someone in the kitchen section of Le Bon Marche the picture and I bet they will point you to where they are now. (Hopefully it wasn't just a Christmas thing).

One thing I completely forgot to buy - a Le Bon Marche shopping bag! I remembered one from the big 3-lettered store in the Marais, but forgot the one I really wanted!

Feb 10, 2014
sweet100s in France