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best bartenders for regulars?

good question. i live in cambridge (central) but get around the city for work so would also enjoy options in south end, north end, downtown/financial.

Mar 06, 2012
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

best bartenders for regulars?

love it! any suggestions for where to get started?

Mar 06, 2012
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

best bartenders for regulars?

thanks polly! i'm not NOT interested in upscale, i just like to go to places where there's a bit of camaraderie :)

Mar 06, 2012
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

best bartenders for regulars?

are you a regular at a bar? i'm looking for spots that are good for frequent repeat visits, but not for snazzy food or well-mixed cocktails (though there could be that). i'm thinking of that kind of vibe where you have a bartender that talks to you and the other folks at the bar so that by the time you finish your first round you want to stay and have another and talk to your neighbor. got any faves hounders?

Mar 06, 2012
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

fun birthday dinner (boxing day) [London]

we are two hounds visiting london for the christmas season, and it so happens my birthday is the 26th. we have rented a flat so we will be cooking in for christmas, but it's always fun to go out for my birthday. we're staying in the islington/shoreditch area and are happy to walk if the weather's decent. we're very adventurous eaters and happy to go with any level of price as long as the place feels special (whether that means trendy and innovative, classic and cozy, or fancy). please no french or indian, as those have been done enthusiastically on recent travels. we'd be especially interested if there's a wild game component to the menu. let me know if you need more guidance.

and while i'm at it, where should we go for a really fabulous afternoon tea? i've booked brown's aready, and am interested in the langham's champagne and/or gin options...any others?

thanks all. can't wait to return to london.

Nov 23, 2010
dianalim in U.K./Ireland

Tory Row Cambridge

oh also, my frittata didn't come with toast, which was a bummer.

May 19, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

Tory Row Cambridge

went for breakfast on saturday...menu looked really good (including grilled grapefruit with honey...exciting!) so even though it was pretty much empty we decided to sit down. it was very mediocre, and i will skip mentioning service because it's been discussed and it's -still- a little early. but the food was very mediocre, which was disappointing given my deep love for the other restaurants in the group
. first of all, our coffee came with creamer packets instead of just milk, which doesn't bother me in a diner but at a restaurant like this, especially one that seems to pride itself in quality of ingredients, it seemed inappropriate. just give me a little glass of milk. anyhow.
mr. got the egg-sausage sandwich, which he said was decent but not exceptional, especially in the company of such excellent breakfast sandwiches near H Sq such as Petsi's, Darwin's, and Hi-Rise. the potatoes side was cold. i got the fritatta, which seemed promising when it came out in the skillet it was baked in, but it was bland and the broccoli was mushy. the grilled grapefruit was delicious, and a cool idea, but...anyhow, the dinner menu sounds more promising, so i'd definitely like to give the place another try, but we will certainly be going back to our tried and true breakfast regimen.

May 19, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

First time in Boston...give me Top 5 must eat at restaurants

thanks for all these side reccs on bread! i'm definitely making a trip to savenor's soon for clear flour and b&r, neither of which i've ever had. iggy's is good (esp their croissants, imo) but not great i feel. my point in the original post is that when i was growing up there were several (3+) local artisanal bread places that would have many, many kinds of fresh loaves just in my local safeway supermarket. there were small bakery shops that made their own bread everywhere, and it was unique and good. i know there's good bread to be found here and i'm happy to get more reccs (i also do love some of hi rise's), but back home it's a way of life. so if anyone ever wants bay area bread reccs, let me know and i'll tell you where to get the best garlic cheese baguette of your life :-)

Mar 18, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

ten tables cambridge...unimpressed

yeah, i hope so on all counts...we'll definitely go back because those all seem reasonable assumptions. i guess, the first impression and stressful noise/environment were so disheartening that by the time we got to the excellent food we were, as mr put it, "exhausted". so i still stand by "unimpressed", but i hold out hope to be impressed sometime in the future.

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

need recomendations for a restaurant to host out of towners for a wedding

nope....unless she's asking for a place to *host the wedding* and not just take out of town guests for a meal while they're visiting, bc clearly a wedding at barking crab is absurd. i might have misread...bb0924, are you looking for a place to take guests to while they're in town, or for a place to actually have a wedding event at?

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

ten tables cambridge...unimpressed

i've been dying to go to ten tables for a long time, but it's never quite worked out. we're in cambridge, so it's a bit of a hike to get to jp, especially when we have so many nearby faves. so we were stoked to find out that they were opening their cambridge location, and went to check it out on saturday. the food was excellent but the environment was not. i'm sure weekday dining would mitigate some of our complaints, but unfortunately the mr. works one of those delightful 7am-8pm kind of jobs, so we're not much for weeknight restaurant going. here's how our night went.

when we got there there were about 10 people hanging out in the front area, some having drinks, some just standing around right in front of the coatrack and front door. we stood by the host stand for a good 5 minutes, at least, before we were even acknowledged by the manager. i know the place is small, but he was very harried and while i sympathize having worked front of house, all we wanted was to be acknowledged with eye contact when we first walked in, and reassured that someone had noticed us. we checked in finally (At least 15 min after our res) and loitered around another 15 minutes or so until we were seated in the back room. the place had the feeling of being an "it" place to dine, if that makes sense, and was nothing like the laid back, good food, homey atmosphere that i'd expected hearing the jp location described. we're not fancy restaurant people, preferring smaller cambridge places to restaurants like no9 park, for example, so i was a little surprised by the vibe. it was warm and *extremely* loud (like conversation was a chore) in there, but we were still looking forward to our meal.

i had: winter greens salad (incredible) and roast chicken with a cabbage-white bean-smoked bacon preparation that reminded me of a cassoulet. the chicken was plentiful and delicious, with a perfectly crispy, salty skin and a nice ratio of light to dark meat. he had: steak tartare (yay for pickled honshimenji) and boudin blanc, which was out of this world. they both made excellent leftovers. i drank a glass of rioja and a glass of a cotes du rhone syrah blend (both were really nice); he had the lillet-tarragon cocktail and a merlot blend (i think bordeaux), they were mediocre. our desserts were divine, and i was happy to have taken advice from previous posts and order the chocolate dessert with thai basil ice cream, and the sticky toffee pudding. we have trouble with desserts at many restaurants (they never seem to match up to a great meal) but this did not disappoint.

so i guess, the food was very great, and the place was deservedly packed. but the level of crowdedness, extreme noise, and "scene"iness, like everyone was dressed up for destination dining and the place had a real "aren't we cool and french" feel, turned us off. a comparison is oleana, which we love and is often crowded but we never feel ignored or weird, like we've walked into a bunch of special occasion dinners wearing our daytime clothes. and once we sit down there it feels intimate, but we didn't get that feel at ten tables. i want to try the jp location now and see how it feels, because i was disappointed not to have found a new fave on sat.

if you have a different impression of the restaurant, or insight, i'd love to hear it!

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

need recomendations for a restaurant to host out of towners for a wedding

i don't know how casual is casual, but you can't beat the "boston" experience at the barking crab in the summer, and they do really well with groups.

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

Where can I find farro?

farro is an ancient wheat that has been in use since the time of the romans. it makes an awesome risotto, and other things. it is commonly referred to interchangeably with spelt, but a nytimes article this past fall explains that the two in fact are very different: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/mag.... cooking times appears to be the most important distinction.

if you're going to head to the north end for any kind of grain or staple, i'd go to polcari's. it's cheap, the guys are helpful, and italian is regularly spoken. and you might be distracted by some other rare deliciousnesses, such as chestnut flour which is awesome stirred into polenta!

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

First time in Boston...give me Top 5 must eat at restaurants

yeah...i hear awesome things but still haven't made the trip, since i'm in cambridge. i now feel i must. the fact that it's a trip at all is what i really lament!

anyhoo pinkwasabi, also portuguese and brazilian food are very delicious and i had never had them before i moved here. atasca is my pick for portuguese; i don't have strong convictions vis-a-vi brazilian, but i'm sure you can use the board to help you out!

Mar 09, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

First time in Boston...give me Top 5 must eat at restaurants

OH and CARIBBEAN food. we certainly didn't have that in Oakland. I don't have deep knowledge of many places, but goat curry is a must if you want to troupe over to the pepper pot in dudley square.

Mar 05, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

First time in Boston...give me Top 5 must eat at restaurants

I'm from Berkeley/Oakland and here's what we have here that I lacked at home:

- middle eastern/north african: Oleana, Baraka Cafe (both in Cambridge, off Central Square)
- Vietnamese: lemongrass pork at the Super 88 in Allston, mixed-meat pho at Pho Hoa in Chinatown (some would recommend Xinh Xinh, but I prefer Pho Hoa for soup...be sure to get the tripe if you're adventurous...it's delicious!)
- east coast seafood, which i'd never eaten before i got here. lobster sandwich: b&g oysters (south end); whole lobster and fried things: barking crab
- ice cream: christina's and toscanini's, both in cambridge
- an excellent lunch spot: parish cafe, at arlington and boylston. rotating menu of sandwiches created by local celebu-chefs, all representative of their restaurants!

if you're from the bay, you'll be depressed by the state of bread here. don't fret.

Mar 05, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

Next week in Boston

Raised Italian, I personally think that Via Matta (near Arlington T stop, not too far from you) is the best Italian in the city. They have a fun bar to sit at and I would recommend it over any of the more upscale North End places.

If you can get over to Cambridge, you'd find my favorite dining options, with some fun bar opportunities. Hungry Mother (Kendall, Southern), Rendezvous on Central Square (Central), and Central Kitchen (more for snacks and bar, Central) would all be nice options. They are a little more homey, stress fresh ingredients, and less trendy than the Boston places, if you prefer that atmosphere.

Also, for French bistro and a KILLER drink menu, you can't beat Eastern Standard. Have fun!

Mar 05, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

solo long weekend for adventurous eater

hello! so i managed to get out of the city in spite of the storm by booking a last minute train ticket. i had a great trip to philly, in no small part because of all of your reccs. i'll do brief reviews here, in case anyone's curious, and for the benefit of future travelers.

night 1: shiao lan kung. flight delayed, plans canceled with friend, what better place to go to dinner at 930 than chinatown. ordered 2 pan fried dumplings, salt baked squid, and pea greens. the dumplings were excellent (i loved the bits of onion inside) and the greens were very good except that i don't do so well with large chunks of garlic (but if you're into that sort of thing they would be incredible), and the squid was good but not the best i've ever had. all in all, solid, and i appreciated that they did 2 dumplings so that i could try them without letting some go to waste.
Day 1: breakfast at dutch eating place. sooo good, blueberry pancakes and bacon. i loved the gigantic pat of butter on my pancakes, and the fresh off the griddle taste. the bacon was perfect in my opinion, a little crunchy but not hard. i thoroughly enjoyed my trip to reading terminal and got a kosher dill at the pickle patch to go.
lunch at pat's. yes, i know. i had to, on orders from the penn bf and my own curiosity. i got a with, with cheez whiz, and it was very good. my pickle was the best i've ever had. i could only take half the sandwich, but i'm glad i did it.
walked through south philly and the italian market, and did some fun antiquing and vintage shopping in bella vista. cool area! decided not to do termini's or anything...just not in the mood for more food.

night 2: dinner at horizons. very good, and refreshing to have vegan food that was inventive but not wild...i found myself a little disoriented at millennium in sf, where they stuff all kinds of flavors into one dish. i had the winter plate and the saffron creme brulee, and everything was delicious. i was especially impressed with the texture and flavor of the tempeh, which was rich and soft and delicious. it was great with the veggies and much more tasty than any tempeh i've ever encountered. i wonder who their distributor is?i was very unimpressed with the room and the muzak-type soundtrack, but in all a solid meal, and so nice to have vegetables after my two very unhealthy meals earlier in the day.

day 2: a bonte waffle to go for breakfast...got up late. it was yummy, we don't have sugar waffles here! i've had them at pain quotidien in nyc (and in brussels) and was happy to find them in philly.
after a voyage out to the art museum, i had a delicious, huge, wonderful lunch at almaz cafe. found it elsewhere on the board, because i was looking for somewhere in rittenhouse with interesting food but where my friend wouldnt be awkward for not eating. i had the cabbage/carrot/potato dish, and thought the injera was delicious, the sides were wonderful, and my strawberry smoothie was also delicious. thumbs up to that place.
for dinner i went to chifa, which i was really excited about. after all the ethiopian i wanted something light, and this really hit the spot. i just had two ceviches: the hiramasa (i think?) and the mixto with shrimp and tomato and avocado. so, one asian and one latin. they were really good, i liked the cornnuts and plantains they served with them. they also sent me a pre-course, which were like gougeres but filled with manchego, and with a guava dipping sauce, so kind of a variation of manchego and membrillo. it was delicious. i also got the white cabbage salad, which was a good idea and i love sesame but just tasted like crunchy sesame oil...there was so much of the stuff all over it. so, if they find away to do less dressing it's a nice simple dish, but as it was when i had it it was close to inedible in more than small quantities. i had the green tea/canteloupe dessert which was kindof weird in its presentation...like a giant petit four. the top green tea layers were good, but the cantaloupe gelee was not too enjoyable to me. they finally sent a little rice krispie treat, which was also very good. i had the lima bean cocktail, which was very interesting. i would also have liked to try the black tea sidecar, but i can only hold one drink. all in all, the room was beautiful, the service pretty good, and the food extremely interesting. i had an impossible time choosing. it would be fun to go with more people to try lots of things, because they're all small plates.

day 3: well, it was a snowstorm. so i went back to reading terminal and had flapjacks and scrapple (had to try it!) at down home diner. very delicious, and the decaf coffee was incredible! that never happens, esp at diners. i liked the scrapple, too. it was hard to resist dutch eating place but i was happy to try somewhere new. i bought some preserves, pickles, and raw goat milk (so cool you guys can buy raw milk at the market!!!), as well as a metropolis focaccia and some local goatcheese at salumeria for dinner on the train, and went on my way. i had planned to go up to northern liberties and other off the beaten path areas, but with the weather i decided just to hang out at the independence museums...much warmer.
i completed my philly eating extravaganza with a trip to naked chocolate cafe, where i had a hawaiian (i love chocolate or caramel with salt) and was very, very impressed. i loved the way they served it with the wafer cookie and the whipped cream on the side, which really helped to cut the intensity of the cocoa. i bought some truffles to go, which i'm excited to have sometime soon. it was a great way to end my awesome trip.

Mar 03, 2009
dianalim in Pennsylvania

Harvard Sq. Breakfast /Brunch?

I did Harvest for brunch with about 12 and it was lovely...and they have a gorgeous patio if the weather happens to be nice. Highly recommended. Deadalus stinks (imho).

Feb 26, 2009
dianalim in Greater Boston Area

food justice/food access in Philadelphia

i've gotten great recs for restaurants to visit this weekend when i'm in town from boston, and now i'm looking to see if i can find out more about food issues in Philadelphia. i work for a non-profit that teaches cooking classes to inner-city youth, and we're really interested to learn about how other cities approach food justice and food access issues. i haven't been able to find out much on my own, so i thought i'd ask hounders. anything from urban gardening collectives, government initiatives, or cooking classes like ours, i'd really appreciate learning about. thanks!

Feb 25, 2009
dianalim in Not About Food

solo long weekend for adventurous eater

wow, awesome. thanks so much everyone! i'll def hit reading terminal market (i love little more than a food market) and chinatown. like mazza i'm italian and don't eat italian out very often, but i love visiting italian areas because it makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside :) the taquerias are also very exciting...i'm originally from cali and mexican (and ethiopian, actually) is a cuisine we don't do that well here in boston.

any suggestions for an evening meal? will i need to make a res anywehere? bar ferdinand looks fun; i checked out fork which i've seen mentioned on the board but wasn't too enthused. i love vegan so maybe i'll check out horizons one night.

Feb 18, 2009
dianalim in Pennsylvania

solo long weekend for adventurous eater

i live in boston and i'm going to philly for a long weekend on a whim at the end of the month. and i eat anything. i'm staying at the sofitel and love walking, and want to see all the parts of the city that you would never recommend to a tourist, and eat all weekend. would love suggestions for divey ethnic restaurants, small local gems (if any of you know boston, my favorite "nice" restaurants are tw food and oleana), and anything in between. my bf went to penn so will have some ideas, but that was some time ago now so i'd love hounders' thoughts too. thanks for the reccs!

Feb 12, 2009
dianalim in Pennsylvania

sustainable food tourism

you are totally right about all that stuff...and i really think it's an educating the consumer thing. i work for/with chef didi emmons (of veggie/vegetarian planet), who has always dreamed of how incredible it would be to have an all local restaurant. and she spends a lot of time on a local farm where they cook all local, and have a great time of it. she told me of a recent soup that was all stored roots, with oatmeal as a base. chefs love that stuff, and there's a lot of creativity. i just think there's time for people to start actually wanting that stuff and making it economically viable. and for the record, that sauerkraut pizza with "boudin noir" was exceptional!

sustainable food tourism

oh yeah, and we went to Tartine in the mission. my youngest sister wants to run a cafe someday, and it was suggested to me that tartine was a really great model for a local bakery/cafe. line notwithstanding, it was incredible. the croissant was the best any of us had ever had, the croque monsieur was out-of-this-world, my pecorino, almond, and thyme sandwich was really original and delicious. we were glad we made the trip. and yes, by public transportation ;-)

vegas: good variety for adventurous eaters

the round up.

NIGHT 1: MESA GRILL. service was decent, margarita was great. the chopped salad was AWFUL...like a salad bar chopped taco salad. they should have been embarassed to serve it, though i was interested to note that the couples on either side of us also ordered it. the standout of the meal was the wild mushroom grits, which were outrageously good. the blue corn/duck pancake was good but the duck and sauce were a little overpowering. the blue corn squid were quite good but not stellar. we loved the tamale and chile relleno, and i loved the brussels sprouts though mr thought they were too sweet.
DAY 2: brunch at BOUCHON. me: chicken and waffles. transcendent. him: croque madame. good, but nothing compared to the croque monsieur at tartine sf the week before.
dinner at ALEX. as good as we expected. they got us in and out really fast, which was quite surprising for a tasting menu, but the food was decadent and luxurious and interesting. i had squid-ink pasta with abalone and sea urchin, and the shortribs, though not an exciting dish, were exquisitely prepared and literally felt like butter in my mouth. at the end there was a monty-python-esque scene where they constantly delivered sweets to our table, apparently hoping we'd explode. we were pretty impressed with the reasonable (Read: small) portion size, though, and the service was impeccable and not overwhelming or stuffy like i sometimes find restaurants of that type. all in all, i felt i understood where my money was going and hey, we were in vegas. once a year a splurge like that is worth it.
DAY 3: NO BREAKFAST (we were stuffed)
lunch at beijing noodle no. 9 in caesar's palace. it was EXCELLENT! i decided that what i really wanted was dumplings and chinese food, so we headed here. the waiters were all chinese and the chef didn't even speak english--he had to show us in sign-language how to mix our noodles together. we got the noodles with pork and mushroom (my favorite), the chinese cabbage with vinegar (spicy, mr's favorite. the waitress was very impressed that we ordered it), and the soup dumplings, which were less good than some that we had in a strip mall in san diego once, but still tasty. all in all, surprisingly authentic in feel and taste, and delicious!
dinner at PHO SAIGON 8. THANK YOU for this recc! we had the pho, some delicious coconut/pork/noodle salad thing, and one of the bean desserts. the tea was delicious, and we were totally glad we left the strip for this place. we will definitely investigate more in this neighborhood next time.
DAY 4: bouchon beignets in bed :-)

Jan 07, 2009
dianalim in Southwest

sustainable food tourism

Alright, here I go:

What I ATE: * tasting menu at MILLENNIUM. what a fascinating menu! and i'm really interested to learn more about CHEFS, the nonprofit they are connected with. i wouldn't suggest the tasting, since it was a bit disjointed and pretty much was just them serving each of us a different item off the a la carte menu. nor would i suggest the cocktails, at least that anyone in our party ordered. but the food was interesting and delicious, complex and thoughtfully prepared. i am always so grateful when restaurants manage to make vegetarian interesting!
* ECCOLO. we were a large party for my birthday and this was the place that my family felt best could accommodate my eating-desires and our family size. i was not especially impressed with the more creative dishes, and everything was over salted, but the basic italian staples were out of this world. the bolognese, the lasagna...someone find out what kind of ricotta they use and let me know because it was incredible!!!
* UBUNTU. we were not disappointed. although it seems a little gimmicky to put the yoga studio in the restaurant, the food was incredible and, i thought, more enjoyable than millennium. the flavors were simpler and cleaner, with each dish really saying something. the cauliflower of course was a standout, as was the cheesecake in a mason jar, which we loved. we agreed hand down that this was our favorite meal of the trip.
* NEW YEARS. food fresh from the farm. i'll post pics and recipes on my blog (citiwalking.blogspot.com) soon, but it was just incredible to have all these fresh vegetables straight from the ground in the middle of winter!

which leads back to the discussion. i've been thinking about it and have a couple of things to say.
1. how familiar are all of you with boston food? i'd have to say it is neither the ingredients nor the chefs that have really shaped the direction of the restaurant mainstream in boston, but rather the patrons. I worked for a year in an upscale, trendy seafood restaurant that catered towards the young foodie scene but also was connected to a boston celebu-chef, so we were known by some as a "fine dining" restaurant. countless times, older bostonians/metro-area residents arrived at the restaurant to be horrified that there was no tablecloth where they were seated. this illustrates, in my mind, what has been the primary obstacle for creative, forward-thinking food in boston. bostonians are only starting to generally accept the idea that *good* food is not always *fancy* food, and without this realization, chefs have been forced to make stuffed lobster and fancy fresh stakes, or perish on the fringes. now, as most places but with a decidedly boston twinge, good food is also linked to status, and most good restaurants are sceney and unadventurous. which is why the majority of places doing work in sustainable farming, vegetarian menus, and similar, are in cambridge and jamaica plain, where the high heel and tablecloth set would never go.
2. i agree in principle with the idea that good chefs, not good ingredients, are the most important thing. but i have to say that, fundamentally, a winter dinner in boston is less fun than a summer dinner in boston. at one of our favorite restaurants, tw food, we had the best tasting menu of our lives this past august. a similar, but winter-ingredient, menu in november was only so-so. tim weichmann is a phenomenal chef, but because of his commitment to local, sustainable products, there are only so many ways he can cook stored squash and apples.
3. on the idea of "heirloom" or "heritage" being a sort of "sauce". this is a complicated issue, and stems mostly from the constant process of fringe, radical food ideas slowly being absorbed into the mainstream of culture, commodified, and subsequently marketed. when when alice waters first put the source of all her ingredients on the menu at chez panisse, this was a radical idea. it wasn't pretentious, and it wasn't to make you think the food was better. it was a simple way of letting her clients know *where their food came from*. this is something that few people think about. now, i know all you bay-area folks are tired of niman ranch this, heirloom that, but let me tell you, out here where it's often still baked lobsters and dunkin donuts, those labels are a necessary way for me to know that a chef connects with ingredients. though i do understand that some of these labels, as a result of the boom in "conscientious consumption" marketing, are now meaningless. reading on what USDA organic really means, or michael pollan's idea of the supermarket pastoral, make this abundantly clear.
4. all of this said, boston and new england are better equipped to handle some of these issues going forward, and it's really exciting. much of the land even 15 miles outside boston is small agricultural land, and the lack of agribusiness up and down new england has made the small farm more able to sustain itself, especially through creativity and good marketing. there was a great article in the times about a community in new hampshire that transformed itself from a blighted post-industrial community into a thriving, niche small-scale agricultural center. farmers markets grow and proliferate every year, and local chefs are slowly getting involved. we have innovative programs like CityFruit/Earthworks, and they are only increasing in their visibility. i could go on and on.

whew! hope that contributed to this rich, interesting discussion, and thanks to all for the advice. i didn't make it to the farms because of complications of holidays, family, and hours of operation, but i will make it a point to check them out sometime in the future.

sustainable food tourism

this is a FASCINATING conversation and very relevant to what we bostonians often discuss... some friends and i are working on getting together a fermenting/preserving/raw milk collective together, and there's other stuff that's starting to take off in the localvore community, like winter csa's, hothouse growing, etc. i'm still traveling so i'll have to write a more full response later, but i think it's safe to say that both sides of the discussion have some credence. yes it's been exciting to have fresh veggies at our disposal all the time (our new years eve/day meals were all local with produce from my grandmothers backyard and my friend's student farm in davis). but it's also been interesting to learn how to store root vegetables in my cellar in boston, make tomato sauce or minestrone soup all october so that i'll have some to eat in february, and boil stored apples into apple sauce till i'm blue in the face. new englanders have always been prized for their ingenuity and thrift, and it's a skill that i'm learning, and learning to appreciate, as i try to resist industrial agriculture. restaurant reviews later!

vegas: good variety for adventurous eaters

oh wow, well, i am totally sold on saigon 8/dakao, as banh mi is one of my favorite food items currently. raku looks incredible but it looks like it's closed sunday night, which is the one that we have free for eating...we're keeping it in mind for late night noshing though.

tonight we went to mesa grill which was hit-and-miss but a fun, low stress endeavor. i'll write more later, but would appreciate any further suggestions on the luxor-mandalay end of the strip for sunday night, since we decided to go see a show down there.

Jan 03, 2009
dianalim in Southwest

sustainable food tourism

thanks all for the thorough, thoughtful comments. it's been amazing to me how different the attitude towards this kind of eating is from how it is in boston...it's rare and exciting for us to find restaurants that demonstrate a commitment to local ingredients, whereas here all chefs seem to pride themselves on their sustainable practices. it's inspirational and informative to be here. not to mention delicious!

vegas: good variety for adventurous eaters

awesome! we've decided to do alex, since we wanted to see le reve one night and figured that was a good combo, and we were also thinking mesa grill. so apparently my research has been accurate :) pho also is very enticing, as it's one of my favorite foods...thanks!!!

Dec 27, 2008
dianalim in Southwest