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Lamb ribs. HELP!

Today at the farmer's market I bought lamb spareribs. I've never cooked them before and was thinking of a braise but am not sure what to do. Any Chowhounds have a clue? When I searched this site, and when I Googled, I found tons of restaurant reviews referring to lamb ribs, even braised lamb ribs: but no recipes.

Anybody out there have a tried-and-true recipe? Or tips or advice? I'll be making them tomorrow.

Thanks!

Jan 12, 2008
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Help! Grass-fed beef

The local farmer's market has a new stand specializing in grass-fed beef. I bought a NY strip steak because I've never had grass-fed beef; and indeed there is very little marbling.

I've read that grass-fed steaks need to be cooked a bit differently than grain-fed beef. Anybody have any tips for me?

Jan 05, 2008
Youffraita in Home Cooking

First Thanksgiving Dinner

What has saved me over the years is: lists! The menu, the shop-for, but most of all, the what-to-make-first. As others have noted, do as much advance prep as you can. Then figure out what you can put together while the bird is roasting and reheat at the last minute, and make a list.

Sounds stupid, I know, but those lists have saved me many times, especially in terms of having everything ready simultaneously.

Nov 10, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

All PIE Menu: a Fantasy, but Can it Become a Reality?

What about spanakopita (Greek spinach "pie") as one of the sides? That has a phyllo crust.

Oct 13, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

favorite ways to prepare zucchini?

That sounds great. My all-time favorite heart-clogger, though, is Paul Prudhomme's seafood stuffed zucchini with seafood cream sauce, from "Louisiana Kitchen." It should be a once-a-year treat: but what a delight!

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Gluten Free Crock Pot Cooking

As others have noted, try a flour substitute if the issue is a thickening agent. Does he have any trouble with potatoes? Not only will mashed potatoes thicken a soup/stew, but you can buy potato starch, sometimes sold as potato flour. It acts kind of like cornstarch only moreso, so I gather (have only begun to experiment). And apparently it's gluten-free:

http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipe/ing...

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Oktoberfest/German party ideas

It is. I usually start with half lager and half broth--maybe a quart total. But to get the caramelization, you need to let it almost dry out a few times, stir, and add a bit more liquid. Needless to say, I do not cover the roasting pan. Your fresh pork will be nicely browned on top. The chops don't need to brown; keep them buried in the kraut. The sausages you'll want to brown a little bit; call it half-buried and flip them when you stir up the kraut. It's actually a really easy recipe to make, and I think choucroute garni is from Alsace, which would make it half-german to begin with. Alsatians would probably use white wine instead of beer; but I think lager adds to the color and is more appropriate for kraut, even when it isn't Oktoberfest!

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Oktoberfest/German party ideas

How about a choucroute garni? I don't know the German term for sauerkraut with a bunch of pork products, but it's pretty much the same recipe: smoked pork chops, bratwurst or weisswurst or a combination like that, and a fresh pork roast of some sort, maybe pieces of ham or bacon. I like to do the kraut with plenty of sliced onion, some caraway seeds, and a braising liquid that is part lager beer, part chicken broth. Also, I do this in a roasting pan with the meat nestled in, so that the kraut sort of caramelizes (you'll want to stir it up occasionally and add more beer/broth/water as it dries out). The classic side would be mashed potatoes, I think.

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Bratwursts in beer-What beer?

You may be right on the brats; but in general I find that lager imparts a richer flavor in cooking than typical American pilsners.

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Purple fingerling potatoes - preserving color

The local farmer's market had these cute Peruvian purple fingerlings. I had intended to do a simple roast with olive oil, salt & pepper but it's to be hot and muggy today, so the oven is out. Would a stovetop saute over low heat achieve similar results while preserving that marvelous color?

A previous thread on fingerlings included a suggestion to parboil, split lengthwise, then saute cut side down in duck fat. Aside from not having duck fat in the fridge, this sounds like a great idea; but I'm afraid cutting them might adversely affect the color.

Anybody try this? Other preparation suggestions welcome. Thanks!

Sep 09, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Turnips

They're terrific mashed 50/50 with either carrots or potatoes and plenty of butter.

Also, back in college, I made scalloped turnips and liked them. (Follow your favorite scalloped potatoes recipe except use turnips or a combo of either turnips and apples or turnips and onions. I don't remember using onions, but might have.)

Aug 04, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Saffron ?

Yes, thank you so much! Have you tried it? I loved it; but more importantly, my elderly father--hardly an adventurous eater--also loved it.

Aug 03, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

How do you use coconut milk?

Long beans aren't always available here. String beans, however, are year-round. I assume they'll work as a substitute?

Aug 03, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Weird Problem- too much creme fraiche!

Could you use it as a substitute for any recipe that calls for sour cream? Rose Levy Berenbaum, in The Bread Bible, has a great recipe for corn muffins that uses sour cream instead of milk, for example; the main difference is that you don't use as much baking powder but add some baking soda. It may have a bit more total liquid, too; at least, I always found them to have a nice, tender crumb when I've made them.

Aug 03, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

refrigerator pickles

I've been thinking of trying them myself. Here's a link:

http://www.marthastewart.com/portal/s...

Aug 02, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

What do you cook in your panini?

Butter, yes, gruyere, ham (I like the slivered kind) and maybe a hint of Dijon. A bit of tomato and/or onion. Very simple and wonderful. (I put the gruyere both under and on top of the ham, to glue it all together.)

Jul 23, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Fungi a la pasta, anyone?

When I've made this, I used an assortment of fresh wild mushrooms, sliced and sauteed in butter, then added heavy cream and reduced -- basically a fettucini alfredo con funghi. I usually use romano rather than parmesan, but that's personal.

Jul 14, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

I Love Anchovies!

Anchovies as a sort of bruschetta topping: Nice Italian bread, some olive oil, topped with a nice-sized piece of pimiento and an anchovy filet. Maybe a few capers?

Jun 28, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Indian sensation [moved from Texas board]

Here's a website I visit for inspiration; they have many curry recipes.

http://www.nandyala.org/mahanandi/

Jun 17, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Saffron ?

A year or so ago, the NY Times ran a recipe for fried chicken that involved soaking the chicken parts overnight in a saffron-infused whole-milk yogurt mixture. I made it a few times but have since lost the recipe. It was wonderful, though.

Jun 03, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Arepas help needed

Thanks; that sounds good. I think I'll try again tomorrow.

May 27, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Arepas help needed

I found the P.A.N. arepa cornmeal and decided to try making them.

The first batch were hockey pucks. The second batch was even worse.

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong: Overkneading? Trying to make them too thick? I'm pretty sure the problem is in my technique (i.e., I don't have one), and I couldn't find any old threads that address the issue.

Please help. Thanks.

May 26, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Flour mixture for making Latkes

I read somewhere that the baking soda is to keep the potatoes from turning brown. Never bothered with it myself.

May 13, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Hot Dog Chili

When I worked at a hot dog joint, we doctored the canned chili heavily. Definitely the cooks added a ton of extra ground beef, plus bay leaf, oregano, probably chili powder and cayenne; and the onions you mention. I don't recall green peppers, and I'm not sure about the beans.

May 13, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Lo Mein - something missing

All the comments are valid, and certainly getting your wok as hot as possible (and having a carbon steel or cast iron wok) would help. Still -- MSG might be a factor. I know! I know! But a friend from Cambodia gave me a homemade curry paste -- and made a point of giving me some MSG "in case the flavor isn't right." When I tasted it something was indeed missing, and a touch of MSG corrected that. I have since added MSG to my spice collection; it will last forever and you don't need much at a time.

Apr 29, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Frittatas: What's your favorite?

Everybody else's choices look so delicious. But I still love the spaghetti frittata I found in Marcella's Classic Italian Cookbook. It's even better if the linguine (I prefer linguine) is leftover and lightly sauced.

Apr 29, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

vietnamese rice and gumbo.

I think most gumbos would use regular rice. Paul Prudhomme recommends converted rice, but I don't think it's essential. If by Vietnamese rice you mean jasmine rice, the flavors might compete too much.

Apr 29, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Using Oven as Slow Cooker

I use my oven for slow cooking all the time. I'd follow QueenB right up until it begins to simmer on the stovetop, then transfer to a low oven (about 250, maybe less if your oven runs hot).

Apr 29, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Calling all cooking! Rice recipes

Arroz con pollo -- chicken with rice. You should brown the chicken first, but I rarely bother. Saute onions, garlic, bay leaf; saute dry rice (I like medium for this) as for a pilaf; then add the chicken back in, some chopped piementos, chicken stock and a bit of beer or white wine, or water and beer (any lager-type beer is good), and a packet of Sazon Goya con achiote. When it's almost done (after about 40-45 minutes), add a box of frozen peas and a large piece or two of piemento. Continue cooking until the peas are done.

There are many different versions; this is how a Cubana friend taught me.

Apr 28, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking

Chicken and Dumplings

As somebody noted above, this really does sound like what the PA Dutch call pot pie (or bott boi). There is another variation, called Chicken Stoltzfus, that involves creamed chicken served over a type of homemade cracker -- it's delicious if you have the skill to make the crackers (I don't) or can find an Amish/Mennonite farm stand that sells them. Or if your SO was once a pastry chef.

Apr 15, 2007
Youffraita in Home Cooking