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Microwaves Are Essential for Things We Don't Need Them For

It's funny that this has come up on Chow, because it's a current subject of discussion in my home. Our microwave has been broken for maybe 6 months now, and it has taken ages for us to do something about it because we're stuck trying to determine if we NEED to replace it at all. But, strangely, as much as I thought the microwave wasn't particularly worthwhile when it was functional, I'm finding that I miss it SO MUCH. I can also definitely say that the loss of a microwave has significantly impacted my "kitchen life," if you will, in a negative manner. The biggest drawback is the inability to thaw things quickly--which means a) I'm scrambling to quickly feed my hangry toddler because her mac + cheese is still cold and congealed from the fridge, b) we're eating out/ordering in way more often (and therefore spending much more money) because I haven't remembered to defrost overnight whatever meat cut I envisioned for dinner. Additionally, I can't quickly reheat leftovers. And I'm washing way more pots and pans because I use them to reheat things on the stove. Overall, I am leaning more and more towards replacing it, because not having one requires much more dedicated thinking ahead in terms of meal plans, etc.

Apr 09, 2014
freelancer77 in Features

One dinner and one breakfast in Napa or Sonoma

We're leaving Monterey on Wednesday morning, driving straight to either Napa or Sonoma, dining and spending the night in one of those places, having breakfast nearby and then continuing on up to Eureka on Thursday itself.

Jun 10, 2013
freelancer77 in San Francisco Bay Area

One dinner and one breakfast in Napa or Sonoma

Dear Hound friends,

I'll start by asking your forgiveness, because I know this subject is a popular one on CH. But after months of research here and elsewhere, I'd still like to ask Hounds for their definitive answers. Here's my dilemma: My husband and I driving from Monterey, CA to Portland, OR in the first week of July. Our plans allow us one Wednesday night dinner and one (Thursday morning) breakfast in either Napa or Sonoma.

We haven't yet decided on our driving route--meaning that we're open to going to either Napa or Sonoma--and we haven't yet booked a hotel room for that one night because we'd like to stay somewhere near our dinner venue (ideally so that we can stumble, in post-prandial euphoria, back to our hotel).

We've never been to the area before, and we'd like to eat one fantastic, memorable dinner that's not more than $120 a head. We're not interested in matching wine courses, since we're not oenophiles. Here are the caveats: my husband doesn't do seafood (I know, I know) or fruit. I eat pretty much anything (and adore foie, truffles, and dessert). Expense is a big factor (we ruled out TFL, Manresa, and Etoile). After looking at menus, prices, and everyone's recommendations, we've narrowed our list down to:

Angele, Goose & Gander, La Toque, Bistro Jeanty, Brix, and Farm.

SO.... where to eat one amazing, memorable dinner, given our preferences? Please tell me which of these places you'd choose, and why.

And, since you've read this far, might you have any breakfast suggestions for the next morning, please? (We can drive there, but don't want to wait forever for breakfast, since we then have to continue on to Eureka.)

THANK YOU!!!

Jun 10, 2013
freelancer77 in San Francisco Bay Area

Mango Varieties - What NOT to Buy

Thanks very much!

May 30, 2013
freelancer77 in General Topics

Mango Varieties - What NOT to Buy

Thank you!

May 30, 2013
freelancer77 in General Topics

Mango Varieties - What NOT to Buy

I'm Indian, and grew up in England, and the mango variety that my family has always loved is called an Alphonso. Unfortunately I have never seen those in the US (unless they are sold under a different name?). Would you happen to know whether they are available in the US? And if not, what variety might be closest as an alternative?

May 30, 2013
freelancer77 in General Topics

Bringing foie gras and/or shark fin into california.

Me too! Whew! Glad to know I'm doing all I can to be good to the world.

May 17, 2013
freelancer77 in San Francisco Bay Area
1

Bringing foie gras and/or shark fin into california.

Dannyrogue, I think I love you.

May 16, 2013
freelancer77 in San Francisco Bay Area

November 2011 COTM: Gourmet II: Desserts and Sweets

I've mentioned this cheesecake on a different board, but I just wanted to direct COTM readers to the Three Cities of Spain Classic Cheesecake recipe in this book, found on page 751. I swear this recipe alone is worth the $35 I paid when the book first came out, and I've made it so often that the giant tome actually falls open to that page when I take it off the shelf. You can view the recipe here: http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/...
It's a fantastic, creamy (not NY-style dry or crumbly) cheesecake--plus it's very easy to make, and it gets rave reviews. The original recipe is wonderful, but, depending on whom I'm feeding, I often change the recipe to make it slightly lower in carbohydrates, and it's still amazing:
- I use pulverized pecans, melted butter, powdered ginger and cinnamon to make a pecan crust instead of the graham-cracker crust that's called for.
- I use Splenda instead of sugar (but I decrease the amount of sweetener).
- I also increase the amount of vanilla and lemon zest in the cheesecake batter, and add a bit more vanilla to the sour cream for the topping.
I urge you to try this cheesecake; it's truly wonderful. The Caramel Chocolate Cheesecake that follows a few pages later (page 757) is also decadent (and requires a bit more work), but if you're looking for a foolproof, classic cheesecake, try this one.

Nov 06, 2011
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Unwelcome squid "bonus" [moved from Home Cooking]

I'm a fairly adventurous eater, but one of the more unpleasant eating experiences I've had happened last summer in Samoa. I was at a little bar where I had ordered a plate of broiled mussels. They were served with little mounds of parsley on top of the mussel meat. I scooped out the meat of the first one and popped it into my mouth -- and it crunched, quite loudly, which is really strange and disconcerting when you're expecting saline chewiness. I spat it out (as politely as I could in company) and looked at it, and there was a teensy white crab in amongst the mussel flesh. I don't know why I found this so distressing -- possibly the incongruous textural thing threw me, and the fact that the tiny crab was cute -- but I was unable to try eating another mussel from that plate, and the rest of them were surreptitiously fed to the local cats hanging around our tables. I'm still happy to eat mussels, but I look them over pretty carefully now.

Apr 22, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

Best basic cheesecake recipe

I make this one regularly: http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/....

I'm not sure what you're looking for in a cheesecake. This one is NOT a New York-style cheesecake, though--where those are crumbly, sorta dry and really dense, this one is smooth, with a lush, almost mousse-like texture and a sour cream layer on top. It's hard to describe, but ridiculously easy to make, and everyone I've served it to has been very complimentary. It's also my husband's favorite dessert, and he's a big cheesecake fan. I frequently make a "lower-carb" version of it by subbing Splenda for the sugar and using a pecan crust instead of the graham cracker one indicated. I sprinkle some cinnamon and powdered ginger into the pecan crust mixture, and I Microplane about half a lemon's worth of zest into the cream cheese batter. It sounds like you're going to have fun trying these recipes -- I hope you find one you love.

Apr 11, 2011
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

No Eggs in The Great Cuisines of India?

Yes, eggs play a hugely important role in Parsi lives and cuisine (they even feature in some of our religious ceremonies). That important role extends to the "laggan nu bhonu," or Parsi wedding feast, which is typically a long, multi-course, lavish affair traditionally featuring two egg-based dishes. One of those dishes is almost always "laggan nu custard," ("wedding custard"). This is a sweet custard, dotted with raisins and almonds or cheroli nuts, and redolent of cardamom. It's served in the middle of the meal as a very rich sort of intermezzo before the rice course (not quite your standard granita, huh?). The other egg dish is usually a savory, onion-based dish that appears later in the meal. (Yes, a LOT of dedicated eating occurs at Parsi weddings -- eating seems to be another Parsi obsession!). If you'd like the laggan nu custard recipe, let me know...

Luckyfatima, recently I happened to read Nigel Slater's recipe for chakchouka, a dish that I was heretofore unfamiliar with. It sounded like your description -- eggs cracked on top of a simmered tomato base. Is it any good? Outside of desserts, the few ways in which I'm happy to eat eggs typically involve adding a bunch of other ingredients to reduce the overall "egginess" of the dish, so chakchouka sounds intriguing.

Apr 09, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

No Eggs in The Great Cuisines of India?

Hmm... so apparently we have a mystery on our hands. After speaking with my father, who then spoke to his very well-informed Parsi cousin in Pune, India, I still have no solid answers regarding the etymology of "akuri/akoori." He did, however, believe it was of Gujju origin, therefore stemming (way, way back, once upon a time) from the Sanskrit. One thing my dad and I talked about was that the direct Gujurati translation of "scrambled eggs" is "charvela eeda" ("eeda" being the Parsi word for eggs)--but, upon looking through the cookbooks, we found that "charvela eeda" is a completely separate recipe that doesn't cover what akuri really is. So it seems that the word "akuri" doesn't contain a recognizable reference to the Gujju word for eggs. (I wonder if it's like scrapple, or bagna cauda, or any of those other foodstuffs whose names don't readily indicate what's in the dish...). My dad actually said, "I would be amazed if there was any Parsi out there who could tell you the etymology of 'akuri'!" Luckyfatima, I have always pronounced it "AH-koo-ree," and I never before noticed that the word does look like "egg curry"--what a great observation!

***
My Dad's Akoori

2 T. vegetable oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
a pinch of turmeric
1 garlic clove, minced to a paste
2 green chillies, finely chopped (optional--or cut into easily-avoidable larger rings for those who want less heat)
2 medium tomatoes (preferably a non-juicy kind, like a Roma or plum), diced small
2 T. chopped cilantro, divided use
6 eggs, beaten gently
1/4 c. milk
3/4 tsp salt
1/2 T. ghee (clarified butter)

Heat the oil in a medium-sized non-stick frying pan, then add onions, turmeric, and garlic, and cook until onions have softened but not browned. Add the chillies, tomatoes and 1 T. cilantro to the pan, and stir to combine thoroughly. Fry gently -- you want some liquid to cook out of the tomato, or it'll make your eggs watery. In a separate bowl, combine the eggs, milk, salt and ghee, and whisk well. Now remove the frying pan from the heat, quickly pour the eggs into the pan, and mix well. Return the pan to low heat, slowly stirring all the time, until the mixture has set to a soft, not-quite-still-quivering consistency with small curds. Decant into a warmed (not hot) serving bowl, garnish with remaining 1 T. cilantro, and serve immediately. Serves 4 with warm, buttered toast.

***

This is the version I grew up with. For me, akoori isn't akoori unless a) it's really loosely set (which is why, to this day, I can't eat any scrambled eggs that are cooked beyond that point) and b) served for breakfast, over buttered toast (although a variant of akoori is served at Parsi wedding dinners). Many people eat it with chapatis, or tortillas, or even cooled as a sandwich filling. You can also use all ghee or all oil, and many variants use 1-2 tsp. ginger-garlic paste instead of the garlic clove. And while I love the tomato, others omit it, or use tomato paste to avoid watering down the final product. To bulk it out, you can serve it Bharuchi-style by adding 2 or 3 large par-boiled potatoes, cubed, to the onions while they fry.

Also, sorry for jumping between the akuri/akoori spellings -- I feel it's more recognizable, at least to me, when spelled "akoori," so that's what I'll stick with from now on...

Apr 08, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

No Eggs in The Great Cuisines of India?

My father is a Parsi and he LOVES eggs, as most Parsis do: Parsi cuisine is dominated by egg recipes. There are few enough Parsis left today that I wouldn't call the cuisine one of the "main" Indian eating traditions, but it certainly is a well-established and delicious one. Let's discuss this Parsi thing first, though, because there seems to be a lot of confusion about it. The word "Parsi" (also spelled "parsee") refers to a member of a specific ethnic-religious group from India. Ancestrally, they were people of the Zoroastrian faith who, fleeing religious persecution, emigrated from parts of Persia in the 8th century A.D. or so to Gujarat, India, where they were granted land. Today, for brevity's sake, it's easiest to say that Parsis were Indian Zoroastrians, but the way that Parsis practice the religion today has drifted so far from original Zoroastrianism that Parsis now have their own faith. Also, Parsis traditionally speak Gujurati, not Farsi.
Parsi cookbooks, although somewhat difficult to come across in the U.S., are worth looking for if you're an egg lover, because they're FULL of egg recipes. I have a few books, and am happy to post recipes here. According to my Parsi grandmother and relatives, the Holy Grail of Parsi cookbooks is Jeroo Mehta's 101 Parsi Recipes. Easier to find, and more recent, is Niloufer King's excellent My Bombay Kitchen. And although I'm not much of an egg eater (to my father's extreme dismay!), I grew up eating akuri regularly, and it's one of the few egg dishes I'm happy to eat. In my experience, Parsis also love to eat various breads--possibly because they're a vehicle for those treasured eggs. If anyone wants a recipe for akuri, let me know!

Apr 08, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

Kitchen towels

It's funny to me that so many people in this post love their WS towels, because I searched "best dish towels" on Chow specifically to find recommendations to replace my WS towels. I have the red-and-white-striped ones (they're about 3 or 4 years old), and they do a decent job of drying, but they leave little fibers all over EVERYTHING, and it's really frustrating to put just-washed white dishes on the table that aren't actually clean because they're covered in visible fuzz! A while back, I read in Ruhlman's Making of a Chef that the CIA actually imports some exclusive brand of dish towels from Europe because they dry really well and don't leave behind fibers -- does anyone know what these are?

Apr 07, 2011
freelancer77 in Cookware

Anyone else on Planet who doesn't like Fruit??

Here's the list of fruit my husband will eat willingly:
1) Apples (and they have to be super-crunchy, fairly tart, and free of bruises).
That's it. Seriously. Apparently he used to like grapes when he was younger, but won't touch them now -- he once vaguely explained that he ate too many and got sick of them. His mom says that he used to like bananas as a child, but he HATES them now, with a passion. In fact he has to leave the room if I'm eating one because he can't stand the smell. He also cannot stand the smell of pineapple, and wouldn't try it if I paid him. I, on the other hand, love most fruit. We just had a baby and I'm wondering how, when she's a toddler, to eventually convince her to try various fruit, especially when her daddy is going to turn up his nose at those same items!

Mar 04, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

Ambrosial annona … on the eighth day God created the custard apple and said “Now this is REALLY good. "

I believe they grow in Mediterranean regions, too, so it's possible, weather-wise. Some time ago I heard -- and I don't know how correct this is, but it might explain why something SO delicious rarely shows up in the US -- that it's illegal to import the fresh ones into America due to some sort of crop-parasite issue. But they really are wonderful, and I hope you get to try them!

Mar 04, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

Ambrosial annona … on the eighth day God created the custard apple and said “Now this is REALLY good. "

If I could choose only one fruit to eat for the rest of my life, it would have to be the mangosteen (NOT mango -- they're good and all, but this is an entirely different fruit). I do mean FRESH mangosteens exclusively -- you can find tinned ones in Asian stores, and they are just a sad, slimy imitation of the original. The tinned ones are not even worth trying, sadly.
I don't think I can properly describe the fresh fruit's flavor, but it's absolutely amazing: bright, vibrant, intense, with notes of pear, pineapple, passion fruit, watermelon and lychee. Inside a hard, thick, fibrous purple shell, the flesh is a pale, creamy pinkish white with glossy black stones embedded in it, which you spit out. They're just incredible. I've had them in India, the Philippines and a few other countries. They're hard to find in the US (in the past I have seen them in various Chinatowns, but I think they're smuggled in, and they're usually not great, unfortunately). In the Philippines during mangosteen season, my mom and I would buy maybe 10 pounds of them at a time, and then sit and eat them, with growing piles of the deep purple shells next to us. If you're lucky enough to get your hands on some fresh ripe mangosteen, crack them open carefully -- you don't want to get any of the yellow interior-shell-lining substance on the fruit, because it tastes hideous. So scrape off any yellow that's gotten onto the white flesh, and enjoy.

Mar 04, 2011
freelancer77 in General Topics

Pickle Juice

A few months ago, my housemate and I, who are both fans of very dirty martinis, discovered that combining pickle juice with vodka makes for a fabulous cocktail. We dubbed it the "Koshertini" as a nod to the kosher pickles that once inhabited that same pickle juice. It's really good -- stiff and salty and briny and delicious, plus very quaffable -- but, as my housemate learned, Koshertinis are also an impressively fast route to a wicked hangover. My guess would be that it's due to the combination of the vodka with the extreme degree of salt in the pickling liquid, perhaps? Cheers, and consider yourselves warned.

Oct 22, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

countries that just don't have good food/overlooked national cuisines

SaltyRaisins -- did you see my post earlier? It looks like you and I might be culinary kindred spirits. I especially loved the first line of your post -- I laughed out loud, and couldn't agree more.

Aug 05, 2010
freelancer77 in General Topics

under-used treasure or garbage? what ingredient do you think people are wasting?

I don't think anyone's mentioned this so far, but I love eating the core from a fresh pineapple. I grew up eating pineapple with the core and all, but when I got older I realized that most people (certainly in America) seem to cut out the core and throw it away. I can't understand why anyone would throw it away -- it's got a milder, sweeter pineapple flavor that's less acidic, and it's got a great chewy texture. These days when I cut up pineapple I cut the core, keep it separately from the other flesh, and happily eat it all myself. As far as other underappreciated ingredients: I also save parmesan rinds obsessively -- I know many people throw them away but they're great for adding richness and flavor to broth, soups, etc.

Jul 06, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Pre-pregnancy feast

I'm 5 months pregnant and I've read and read and read about all the various foods that should or should not be eaten while pregnant. I have read in several places that feta cheese is absolutely acceptable (as long as it's pasteurized, which most cheese is in the US). Goat cheese, brie and blue-veined cheeses are out, but feta is okay. As for what I miss the most, sashimi is at the top of my list, along with rare steak (I have never been able to stomach steak that's cooked beyond medium, and that's more true now than ever, which unfortunately means I'm just not eating steak these days) as well as smoked salmon, raw oysters and prosciutto. My birthday is tomorrow and my dad wants to take me to a fabulous new restaurant in town, but the menu there is laden with raw oysters, foie gras, chevre and lots of other things I would love to eat but can't, so I'm apprehensive about even trying to go there because I'll be so limited in what I can order. Frankly there are so few items that I want to eat these days that all I can think about are the things I'm not allowed to eat. My go-to pregnancy foods thus far have been Campbell's Beef Consomme, all kinds of olives, cherry tomatoes, sweet tea (preferably from McDonald's -- I swear that stuff is liquid crack) and pineapple.

Jul 06, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Vichyssoise with onions

So I've got a slightly off-the-topic question related to vichyssoise: I love eating vichyssoise, but I dislike making it. I find it very wasteful, because you have to cut off so much of the green portions of the leeks (and the only leeks I've found at the market have a lot of dark green). Can you do anything with the cut-off tops, beyond making stock? Is it worth saving them or freezing them? I'm loathe to throw them away...

Jun 24, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Cooking Club of America

I really do heart Chowhounds. I was literally in the process of sealing the CCA reply form in its postage-paid envelope when I had the thought to check Chowhound for any posts on this club, and, as usual, I'm so glad I did. I know that my husband and I are still receiving emails from Columbia House, despite the fact that we cancelled our membership, oh, 8 years ago, so I don't appreciate companies like this. I also hate all the deceit inherent to this process -- I'd be much more likely to respond positively if the marketing materials were honest in the first place. In any case, a big THANK YOU to everyone who weighed in on this! I kept the magnet and bench scraper, and have chucked the rest into the recycling.

May 05, 2010
freelancer77 in Not About Food

Crack Pie Recipe

I'm sorry, but since I haven't had the luck to try a slice of the infamous pie, I have to ask: $44?? It's a pie -- one with fairly basic, inexpensive ingredients at that -- so I'm wondering if it's really worth the whopping price tag? Even once you account for the overnight shipping cost alone, is it still worth paying all that money? I believe in simplicity of ingredients, but, that said, I'd wager the price might be warranted if the pie were made from four types of Callebaut and Valrhona chocolates plus, I dunno, pearl dust? Edible gold? So, Hounds, tell me: it's gotta be one HELL of a pie to be worth the cost -- is it?? And should I try making it?

Mar 05, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Sticky Toffee Pudding

I'm curious: does anyone know why it's necessary to add baking soda to the steeped dates? I've looked at, and made, several recipes for Sticky Toffee Pudding and they all have that step in common. What does the baking soda do at that point in the recipe?

Mar 05, 2010
freelancer77 in Recipes

Million Dollar Moroccan Chicken, Thanks Free Sample Addict aka Tracy L

I have to admit that I made the Pillsbury Cook-Off winning recipe in part because I was skeptical about how good it could possibly be... but frankly, it was delicious. And easy. And I made it with items I always try to keep in the house -- with one exception. Rather than going with the standard salsa I keep in the pantry, I figured it would be worth choosing a salsa that might better lend itself to this dish. So, after reading the recipe a few times, I wandered through the salsa section at my grocery store and eventually chose a jar of Pace Pineapple Mango Chipotle Salsa -- I thought the sweet fruit and the smokiness from the chipotle would enhance the "Moroccan" flavor aspects (although, that said, I'm not Moroccan, and I make no claims as to authenticity). (The salsa, by the way, is surprisingly good -- especially since it's something I'd usually stay far away from! -- really smoky, with large chunks of pineapple and mango. I'd never tried it before but will absolutely buy it again, particularly for this recipe.)

I changed the recipe a little: the first thing I did was toast the cumin seeds (dry, in the same pan that later gets used for the chicken) until they were golden and aromatic. I scraped them out into a bowl, and then continued with the recipe. I used chicken breasts (because that's what was in the freezer) and sprinkled them with plenty of garlic powder (omitting the fresh garlic, so it wouldn't burn) and a little sumac; I used golden raisins instead of currants, and fried them along with the chicken to caramelize them a bit. I also subbed chicken broth for the water. At the end I sprinkled a big handful of chopped cilantro over the whole thing. I served this over quinoa that was tossed with olive oil and fresh thyme, which was lovely. I could also see it being really good with rice, plain polenta, or anything that will soak up the lovely sauce -- because otherwise you'll want to lick the serving dish!

Despite any reservations you might have, I'd urge other Hounds to try this recipe.... it's really worth trying at least once, because it's easy and inexpensive to make, and delicious.

Now I'm wondering if I should re-consider my skepticism of other Pillsbury contest-winning recipes...

Mar 01, 2010
freelancer77 in Home Cooking

Why Do People Always Order Ginger Ale When They Fly?

Growing up, my dad always used to order tomato juice -- and only tomato juice -- when we were flying somewhere. I think his reasoning was somewhere along the lines of, "Its heavier/fuller consistency fills and settles the tummy more." I don't know if that's correct, but I know that I always order tomato juice whenever I fly (probably out of childhood habit), but I never feel nauseated on planes. Plus, I think it's more satiating (in terms of hunger) than thinner liquids, and lord knows free food is hard to come by on flights these days...

Mar 01, 2010
freelancer77 in Features

Do you have a favorite I'm-alone-now-so-nobody-will-know favorite dish?

This is such a great post. This thread made me remember one of my weird childhood "alone foods." As a little kid, I distinctly remember taking surimi pieces (back when they were called krab sticks) and peeling them into many little strips, a la string cheese. Then I would "fry" the strips in my tiny blue plastic frying pan over the "stove" of my play kitchen, and happily eat them from the miniature blue skillet. Odd, huh? Lord only knows how my parents decided to start keeping surimi in the house in the first place.

Nowadays there aren't many things I wouldn't eat in front of my husband, but, when home alone, I do occasionally bust out a package of ramen (the uber-cheap kind), boil the crap out of it with its seasoning, and then pour a whisked raw egg into the saucepan. Instant egg-drop noodles, whee! I have also been know to eat a bowl of salted white rice with grated cheddar cheese mixed into it, as a meal in its totality. Also, I'm embarrassed to admit that I really like cans of fruit cocktail -- the kind with the super-mushy pear pieces and neon red cherry halves. These days I try to at least drain the syrup first, but that wasn't always the case.

Sliced green apples with salt or cheese. Velveeta Shells and Cheese -- the whole box, thankyouverymuch. And those terrible, 1000%-RDA-of-sodium, packets of cup-a-soup mix. And my favorite I'm-not-ashamed meal is a can of Campbell's Tomato Soup (it HAS to be Campbell's) mixed with a can of milk rather than water. That stuff's like mother's milk.

Jan 27, 2010
freelancer77 in General Topics

Do you have a favorite I'm-alone-now-so-nobody-will-know favorite dish?

I'm pretty sure Michael Symon serves a sandwich very like your description above at his burger bar -- maybe minus the iceberg. He's apparently really into the fried bologna sandwich. So you're in good company...

Jan 27, 2010
freelancer77 in General Topics