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Lunch near (but not at) the Mandarin Oriental

There isn't lots of good eats in that area. There is a Potbelly sandwich shop and a Starbucks by the hotel, the SW Maine Avenue Fish Market if you walk further down (about 10 min) w/ vendors selling crab cakes, fried fish, shrimp sandwiches, etc., and, there is the Dept of Agriculture's Cafeteria that is open to the public.

DC restaurant recs for a finicky friend?

I'm having dinner w/ a friend that's coming into town but am having a hard time figuring out a place to go. She's got a history of food disorders and is back on a healthy diet of protein, veggies and salad so that's what she's looking for, nothing more, nothing less. She can't deal with spices so ethnic is out and it can't be too fancy--the simpler the better. Any DC restaurant suggestions out there that will also keep me happy?

Leftovers: The Career Killer

Some have mentioned the issue of how to deal with food smells in the office? This is in light of the fact that some of us (who enjoy food) don't mind the smell because it's about the taste that matters the most, and the fact that everyone has different tolerance to certain smells . What's good might be "putrid" to someone else. Not the typical smelly fish being nuked, mind you, but things that are more case by case, like garlic, peppers, onion and curry. Seemingly non-offensive foods if used in small quantities. I love bringing my own lunch and often use some form of these ingrdients (sparingly, in my humble opinion) in my food prep. In my old job, someone made a snide comment about "wow, that garlic sure smells and wrinkled her nose." But I didn't think it was smelly at all. I also observed one guy nuking his food while another colleague stood around the ofc kitchen to see what he was doing and when the food came out, made comments about how "spicy" it smells and how they wouldn't be able to eat it. How to deal with such nonsense? Chalk it up to them non-chow types missing out on the enjoyment of all foods and call it a day? Or bar ourselves from eating food that are deemed offensive by others because there are workplace perceptions and judgements in these comments?

Aug 10, 2007
sliu in Features

SF Hound visiting DC - what do you think of my list?

Most of the places you listed are good. Personally, I can do w/o Sushi Taro- SF has much more options in the way of sushi and Japanese. And Vace and Five Guys= so-so. Ben's is good b/c it's a DC landmark and the half-smokes are unique but for very yummy fare--I echo the Oos and Aaahs recommendation on U Street. It's great soul food. Be sure to catch them early because lines can get long and the good stuff (ribs, chicken and gravy, etc.) starts running out. And Malaysian Kopitiam is a gem- great street Malaysian food, "mom's kitchen" kind of ambience at an accessible location. Lastly, I agree with another poster that the American Indian Museum has the best food around. Pricey for museum "cafeteria" food but it is not standard fare and it's the type of stuff you can't find anywhere else. DC breakfast-- well this is a weekend brunch kind of place and much of it is standard fare. For something different, try Vegetate (vegegtarian). Tabard Inn also has a good brunch in a beautiful surrounding. Or you could do Bombay Club's buffet brunch. Hotels- try the Kimpton hotels or Tabard Inn. The newest Kimpton is Hotel Palomar in Dupont Circle on P Street NW. Easy walking/metro access to many of the restaurants and to many of the sights by the mall.

Film Feast

301/302-- it is a creepy Korean movie that features lots of food.

Feb 20, 2007
sliu in Features

The Sweet Fruits of a Bitter Divorce

Amazing Gourmet did an article on the history of Taiwanese/Chinese food and politics. What an interesection. I definitely know firsthand about this as a Taiwanese-American. Ppl in Taiwan are very proud of their cuisine and everyone loves eating.

Unfortunately, I can't find the article on Gourmet's website. Please post it if you have the url!

Oct 26, 2006
sliu in Features