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Fake Accent

alfredo is another one of those american versions of a non-existent italian sauce

May 14, 2007
Tjaart in Features

Banana Cream Pie

I live in South Africa, but in my youth was tantalized by my mother's aunt, Mama Sylvie's, amazing pumpkin and banana cream pies. She had married and lived in the South of America for some years, but returned to South Africa after her husband died. Her pies were the best in the world to me, and she refused to serve them in any smaller slices than quarters, but their recipes have been lost. I have found and used many good recipes since, so I'm not looking for recipes, but suddenly fascinated by the notion of where banana cream pie started. Does anybody have some serious historical information about the origins of the most delectable Banana Cream Pie?

Apr 27, 2007
Tjaart in General Topics

cooking with alcohol

what are the latest findings about how much alcohol in a dish/cake/etc is driven off by cooking, and how much remains. i suppose the longer you cook it the more is lost, but i have heard some very conflicting opinions

Apr 15, 2007
Tjaart in General Topics

A Haute Hunger-Awareness Campaign

Living in an African country that is ostensibly wealthy, but with starvation, hunger and AIDS a daily living reality, I can only say: Yukkh! "The incongruity etc..." with its clever "fodder for reflection" is nothing if not a nauseating reflection of first-world smugness when faced with real poverty and real starvation.

Apr 04, 2007
Tjaart in Features

What is on your menu for the holiday feast?

I am doing three small meals, one on Saturday for a friend, one Sunday night for my sister and her daughter, and one on Monday for another friend.
Saturday : start with
spicy sausage meat patties and chipotle hummus,

mains grilled tuna with a salty-sweet glaze and a ginger-miso sauce (from epicurious) with a Japanese potato salad

and Christmas pudding with rum butter;

Sunday

a cold pickled tongue with salads (we are in hot Africa) and homemade Christmas cake and true vanilla ice cream

Monday

chilled peach soup
grilled matured rumpsteaks with harissa & green beans with lemon - Nigella & oven-baked carrots with sherry and black pepper
Christmas tiramisu (made with Christmas cake crumbled and triple sec)

I will be cooking like a madman, but it will be fun!

Dec 19, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Calling all favorite fish dishes

another great way for a whole fish is cut three diagonal slits in the descaled skin both sides and stuff them with fennel and lemon butter (just chop fennel finely, and mash it into the butter with some lemon juice) and put a knob of the butter inside, then grill over coals - when the slits turn opaque the fish is done

Dec 19, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Buttermilk Biscuit Questions

if you have access to Cooks Illustrated, their recipe for buttermilk biscuits really works well - they also have a good method of shaping the biscuits by hand

Dec 19, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Buttermilk Biscuit Questions

certainly adding the cooked crumbled bacon sounds right
you could substitute bacon fat for some of the shortening or lard if your recipe calls for it, but certainly not for butter
just patting the dough into a rectangle on a lightly floured board should be just about enough kneading
dipping your very very sharp knife in flour before doing a fast cut down would help

Dec 19, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

The best anchoiade - sombre and scintillating!

This is another meek request from a cookery-book-less hound (you should hear me howl when I try to contemplate the loss)for a recipe for what is the best anchoiade I have ever tasted, which appears in Alan Davidson's book of Mediterranean fish cookery. If I remember correctly he calls it a "grand anchoiade" (like a "grand aioli") and suggests serving it surrounded by little black olives, quoting the French description - "en couronne d'un velours sombre et chatoyant": something like "in a crown of sombre and scintillating velvet". If you have the recipe, make it anyway - the flavours are rich and complex!

Dec 19, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Escoffier recipes

I did the same and found only five recipes in the first ten pages, and none of them the same as Escoffier's. Interesting information about puddings in general though. Thanx.

Dec 18, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Escoffier recipes

Thanx that's great!

Dec 18, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Escoffier recipes

I am looking for Escoffier's recipes for Saxon Pudding and its variations - I have lost my Guide Culinaire translation and it is very difficult and time-consuming to replace it here. Can somebody help me, please?
Greetings from Africa
Tjaart

Dec 17, 2006
Tjaart in Home Cooking

Anyone else fed up with "molecular gastronomy"?

I think it will come and go as did nouvelle cuisine and all the other food fads, and maybe leave behind a few interesting ideas. I must say I find the molecular stuff particularly decadent in its most negative sense - rich people playing with their food.

Dec 10, 2006
Tjaart in General Topics

Do YOU eat the rind on Brie?

Of course I eat the rind! If it tastes bad, there's something wrong with the whole cheese.

Dec 10, 2006
Tjaart in Cheese

"Peasant" Food

In Southern Africa mealiemeal porridge (maize meal cooked in water with salt - polenta) is a poor man's staple, eaten with soured milk and sugar, or with morogo: stewed wild green leaves of any (edible)description, or with stewed tomato and onion sauce. Meat only on special occasions. Weddings and especially funerals are times to indulge in as much meat as possible (goats, sheep and oxen slaughtered at home)cooked over charcoal or boiled in large pots. Tripe is a great favourite. Softer meats like liver etc are reserved for children and the elderly. Chilli has become a favourite flavouring. In her book on Chinese Gastronomy Lin Yutang's wife writes that peasant food is often more highly spiced because that is more filling (Witness also Madhur Jaffrey in East Asian Cooking that a bowl of rice with the fiery sambal oelek chilli paste is a poor man's meal). In Chinese cooking a small portion of stir-fry helps 'to make the rice go down'.

Oct 27, 2006
Tjaart in General Topics

Fake Accent

I have just found an extensive and quite scholarly article on French toast at http://www.answers.com/topic/french-t..., which takes it right back to the middle ages. The 'answer" is taken from Wikipedia and includes links to good recipes.

Oct 25, 2006
Tjaart in Features

Fake Accent

I quote from a great site on British food - The Great British Kitchen:
Poor Knights of Windsor
The name of this very simple pudding has a certain frugal grandeur which is in keeping, for it transformed meagre stale bread into a delicious rich dessert. The Poor Knights of Windsor, incidentally, was a military order formed by King Edward III in the fourteenth century.

Oct 25, 2006
Tjaart in Features

CHOW Ginger Beer

My mother used to make it with dried stem ginger - the ones they make the ginger powder, or ground ginger, from - which was boiled in the water for quite a while. The flavour is quite different. I like to combine the two, both dried, boiled to an infusion, and then with fresh added as you do, though considerably more - which makes for a really 'hot' refreshing cold drink. No lemon peel, only a touch of juice to cut the sweetness, and white cane sugar.

Oct 25, 2006
Tjaart in Recipes

Fake Accent

French toast is fairly obiquitous in Europe as a means of using up stale bread. In Englanf it is called Poor Knights of Windsor and is often accompanied by jam, in Spain I'm not quite sure what they call it, but it is well and alive and thriving there. We grew up with it dusted with sugar and cinnamon, as a dessert - on special occasions, with apricot preserves (home-made in my youth) and/or runny cream. I often wonder why the French call it 'lost bread', which is the translation of pain perdu.

Oct 25, 2006
Tjaart in Features

Death Warmed Over

In South Africa we have a Cape Malay dish called 'funeral rice' which has been just about obligatory at all the funerals I have gone to. It is rice cooked with butter, raisins, a fair amount of turmeric (enough to taste and colour the rice bright yellow, but too much makes for a bitter flavour - say a teaspoon per cup of rice?), cinnamon sticks and a teaspoon of sugar to sweeten it slightly - to be eaten with 'bobotie', a local dish of lightly curried mince, dried apricots and almonds baked in a milk and egg custard flavoured with lemon leaves, or a saucy curried lamb stew, usually with a lot of carrots in it (again a sweet touch). I think this food is both substantial and the sweetness brings comfort.

Oct 24, 2006
Tjaart in Features