Leucadian's Profile

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Long-baked apple confit?

I seem to remember a dish which consisted of just apples (peeled, cored, sliced), sugar and butter, baked for a long time (18-24 hours) in a slow oven. I baked a similar tart last week, and it was great, but now I'm looking for the post that was my inspiration. I think it was invented by Pierre Herme or someone equally famous. No crust if I remember correctly.

Aug 08, 2013
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Birria de Chivo

As of 2 weeks ago Los Reyes in Vista was still serving birria de chivo on the weekends.

Feb 16, 2012
Leucadian in San Diego

ISO high quality bulk chocolate

I remember long ago I could buy 10 lb bricks of chocolate locally. WF has good selection buy I wonder if there's a better source. Ghiardelli Callebaut Vahlrona?

Feb 03, 2012
Leucadian in San Diego

ISO beeswax for canales

Hi Kudruu,

Here's the link to four very long thread on caneles started by pilinut and egged on by souschef, trewq and buttertart. There may be more. It's entertaining reading, especially if you enjoy others' OCD habits. Look for a response by gaetano with recommendations from a professional baker.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/723314

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/731123

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/732844

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/737402

Apr 04, 2011
Leucadian in San Diego

French Toast, a procedure poll

I have never heard of this, but it sounds great. I take it the tortilla is not folded over, but rather flipped on the other side? Shall we call it a roti huevilla? Or maybe omelette avec tortilla a la inde?

Jan 10, 2011
Leucadian in Home Cooking

French Toast, a procedure poll

Could you describe in more detail your SIL's dish? The roti john I'm familiar with was purportedly made for Europeans in Singapore who wanted a fried egg breakfast and the cook wound up using western yeasted bread and eggs together. John was a generic term for westerners. The roti part of the name I think came from roti prata which is an enriched unleavened flatbread, favored for snacks and breakfast. I'm not altogether sure of this etymology, but there were no chapatis in the history, and very little Indian influence either. I'm interested in what royal style means in your family.

Jan 09, 2011
Leucadian in Home Cooking

French Toast, a procedure poll

The savory version sounds like the roti john that's popular in Singapore. http://thebuddingcook.blogspot.com/20...

Jan 07, 2011
Leucadian in Home Cooking

French Toast, a procedure poll

I just checked a 1965 edition of 'Je sais cuisiner' (the French equivalent of 'Joy of Cooking'), and her method is to combine milk, sugar and eggs (400g stale bread, 1/2 liter milk, 150g sugar, 2 eggs). Fry in 125g butter, finish with powdered sugar and optionally cinnamon. She did not know about maple syrup I guess.

Jan 03, 2011
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Fresh Yeast in San Diego

I saw the small foil wrapped cubes of fresh yeast at Cardiff Seaside market the other day. Might be a seasonal item however.

Dec 29, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Fatty, filling bean dishes?

I make rice by cooking it in oil first till opaque, then adding the liquid and salt. It's a technique used in South America kitchens, and it's also the jumping off point for Indian biryani. That would add a little fat to your diet. The biryani would add a lot of fat I think.

We cook black beans all the time (mirepoix + onion and garlic sweated in oil, dried beans, stock, s&p, ham bone) and the rice is perfect with it (complete protein, and lots of flavor).

You might try sourdough breads also: it's free, and some say it reduces the glycemic index for breads. Also whole grain breads (whole wheat or rye) are slower to digest.

Dec 29, 2010
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Hazelnuts source

Thanks for the replies. I did find a small package at Vons in Encinitas, but they were quite expensive, $4 for 2.5 oz. and more for husked.

Dec 17, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Hazelnuts source

Who carries hazelnuts/filberts/noisettes in San Diego?

Dec 13, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Trader Joe's 72% chocolate changed?

I think they had a packaging mixup. I went back to my local TJ, and the 500g half pound plus bar of 72% Dark Chocolate (red package) was out of stock, or at least not visible. I did find the small triple package at the checkout (same label and color, but 47g bar) and it is the same as I remembered: dark, snappy, somewhat sharp, not too sweet. When I compared it to the last little block of the big package, the difference was obvious: the big block was lighter, softer, and sweeter. The color was distinctively 'milk chocolaty'. Not the same at all.

The next time I'm in the store I'll ask what happened. I just hope they're not changing the formula.

Oct 16, 2010
Leucadian in Chains

Trader Joe's 72% chocolate changed?

Nope, it's as fresh as the Southern California rain that's falling right now. Best by Dec 2011. I don't think my 'reference bars' were ever close to expiry either. They never last that long.

Oct 06, 2010
Leucadian in Chains

Trader Joe's 72% chocolate changed?

It's a tough assignment.

Oct 04, 2010
Leucadian in Chains

Trader Joe's 72% chocolate changed?

Has anyone noticed a change in TJ's Pound Plus 72% Belgian dark chocolate? I bought a bar last week and immediately noticed a significant difference in the snap, mouthfeel, and flavor. Softer all around. Before it was much crisper, and had a sharper taste to it (more acid?). The new bar is OK, and acceptable on its own, but it's not at all the same, and not nearly as interesting. I have been buying and eating this for a couple of years now, and I like to think that I know what it should taste like. Am I alone in wondering what happened?

Oct 04, 2010
Leucadian in Chains

San Diego ingredient hunt "levadura de pie"

Thanks Jan, that's it. It's sourdough, so the massive quantities in the OP refer to starter, not dried or fresh commercial yeast.

Sep 10, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

San Diego ingredient hunt "levadura de pie"

Any further information on levadura de pie?

Sep 08, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Almond paste

Stan also has specialty flours and supplies for home bakers. He's a great asset to the San Diego baking community, and I heartily recommend him.

Aug 25, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Almond paste

This was posted on The Fresh Loaf by dwcoleman a few days ago.

quote
There are two methods for almond paste that I know of. The recipe below is the quick and dirty one. The other is much longer and requires cooking sugar, etc.

If you are making paste to keep for a long time, make sure you freeze it.

Recipes - Bread - Almond Paste

454g blanched almonds
454g confectioners' sugar
3 egg whites
1 teaspoon almond extract

Grind almonds in a blender. Thoroughly mix in sugar, beat egg whites slightly, then stir into the almond mixture.

Add almond extract using hands to blend heavy mixture.

end quote

Aug 05, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

San Diego ingredient hunt "levadura de pie"

If you add equal parts 'levadura de pie' and flour, then the levadura definitely is not commercial yeast that's used for baking. You asked about brewer's yeast. There is a nutritional supplement sold as Brewer's yeast that consists of 'deactivated' (killed) yeast, so don't buy it at a health food store thinking it is for baking. I believe that all commercial baking yeast (Fleishmann's, SAF, fresh, instant, dried, etc.) is derived from brewer's yeast, highly concentrated so you use very small amounts in baking (on the order of 1-3% of the flour weight). I think that your levadura is a sourdough culture that is not very concentrated at all, so a large amount is used to inoculate the dough. But even for sourdough breads, a 1:1 ratio by weight is pretty high, so it may be that the levadura contributes something else besides just the yeast, like a different taste and texture due to the relatively long fermentation of the starter. And if the measurements are 1:1 by volume rather than weight, I would not have much hope for the recipe.

Most languages are not very precise about leavenings, and even those that have a large vocabulary often overlap the meanings, making it difficult to understand what is going on. Could you perhaps quote the entire recipe so we could parse it out a little better?

Aug 01, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Help with sourdough starter please!

Another ancient thread to jump into. Since my last post here, I've learned a lot, mostly from The Fresh Loaf community, and some from hands-in-the-dough experience. I have changed my mind in that period about the books that I like, mostly based on their recommendations for starting a sourdough culture and maintaining it, and partly on the techniques and recipes that the author promotes.

The best explanation and technique for growing a sourdough culture is here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1085...
and a day-by-day account of one person's experience is here (predates the pinapple post):
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1025...

The essence is that the yeasts and bacteria for SD are contained in the flour, and mostly on the bran, so don't bother with 'catching' yeast from the air, but do use a whole grain flour (rye is best) to start your starter. The 'Pineapple solution' in the above link is a reference to the use of a low pH to help the desirable bacteria and supress the undesirable bacteria. The first growth of many sourdough cultures is actually undesirable bacteria, not yeast, and the whole mess seems to die while the microbes sort out their environment.

Good luck with your starter and your baking.

Other methods of SD starting seem very idiosyncratic, and Silverton's especially winds up with huge amount of discard.

Jul 29, 2010
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Fresh Yeast in San Diego

Try New York Bakers (here in San Diego):
http://www.nybakers.com/index.html
He also has specialty flours in small quantities.

Jul 29, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Bread yeast and flour in SD

Since this thread has already been resuscitated, I'd like to add that there's an interesting source for flour and supplies in SD. http://www.nybakers.com/index.html

He has reasonable prices and a very interesting selection of specialty flours. And fresh yeast. And malt. It's really an on-line operation, not a store-front, so call ahead. The owner Stan Ginsberg is working on a book with a retired NY baker named Norm, from The Fresh Loaf, and I can say that his onion roll recipe is a sure winner. I used All Trumps High Gluten flour (14.2% protein) from General Mills last weekend and it was great.

Jul 29, 2010
Leucadian in San Diego

Passing of Sam Fujisaka - Please share Memories

Sam set high standards for the rest of us, in his writing, his breadth of knowledge, his adventurousness, and his graciousness. And now, I'm sure, in his courage. He's a hard act to follow.

Apr 15, 2010
Leucadian in Site Talk

how to use up my heavy cream

Hot cocoa (I call it bitter-sweet-cream to remember the proportions):
1 part Drostes/Dutch Style cocoa (1 tsp)
2 parts sugar (2 tsp)
3 parts cream (1 Tsp)
10-20 parts hot water (fill the cup)

Jan 08, 2009
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Let's talk about tomatoes

And here in southern California, I just bought the vendor's last 4 tomatos at the Farmer's market. Mine gave out a couple of weeks ago (we do have seasons here). I'll be looking for Isis Candy when I order seeds for next year. Have a great summer.

Oct 05, 2008
Leucadian in General Topics

Question about french toast

I'm with you. The only purpose of the milk is to allow the mixture to be absorbed into the bread. I put a few tablespoons per egg, and using good open crumb bread, it works perfectly.

There is an alternate version, however, where thick slices bread are soaked overnight in a more milky mixture, yielding a definite custard-like interior. When I made it a few months back, it turned out delicious, but not the classic American french toast. see http://www.chow.com/recipes/10859

Sep 15, 2008
Leucadian in Home Cooking

Ethnic Markets in San Diego

There was a shop in the Sorrento Mesa food mall (near Staples) that sold all sorts of meat pastries, and the owner was South African. Went out of business about 7 years ago. Is this the same fellow? If so, he's well worth a special visit. And if not, I'll drop by when I'm in the area.

Sep 07, 2008
Leucadian in San Diego

Compendium of Dishes: Super Cocina (SD)

I dropped by SC the other day, and had a pork dish they called 'cebollinas'. It looked like puerco en chile verde con verdolagas, except that the verdolagas were replaced with the 5-6" pieces of green onion. When I questioned the lady at the steam table, she agreed that it was the same except for the substitution. It was pretty good, but I liked the verdolagas version better (more substance to the sauce, and more flavor). So, there's a variation, and not a seasonality issue I'm sure, because the volunteer verdolagas in my garden are doing quite well.

Sep 01, 2008
Leucadian in San Diego