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COOKING FROM LOBSTER AT HOME BY JASPER WHITE, WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE RECIPES?

Oh, yum. So glad you have resurrected this thread. I love this book!

about 17 hours ago
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

May 2015 COTM: EAT, Chapters 5-7, pp. 173-319

That looks and sounds wonderful. Our blood oranges are long gone, but I think I'll give this a shot with a regular orange. And I think I'll steal the pork tenderloin idea too!

Buttermilk pie? Sugar pie?

Love to hear how this comes out and whether the to is indeed crunchy. My pie looks exactly the same as JetLaggedChef's, and the recipe (above) is pretty similar (less sugar, more eggs and buttermilk), but it starts baking at high temperature and is lowered. The top has a slightly "crunchy" texture, but not sure it's what you're looking for.

May 04, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapter 5, Vegetables

Looks very good! I'm looking forward to doing a repeat of this.

May 04, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

Thrilled to see you here, mc, and so glad you liked your bruschetta! (Lemon zest mixed w/the ricotta--wish that had occurred to me as I was going through a little tub of it.)

We also had some of our arugula-walnut pesto w/ricotta on grilled ciabatta, and that was pretty tasty. Using it in potato salad sounds like a wonderful idea. I'll definitely try that.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

TUNA & EGG TRAMEZZINO, p. 97

We have had the great fortune of having spent a fair amount of time in Venice, and while my favorite memories are of shopping at the Rialto market and cooking myself and while I almost always order linguine vongole in restaurants, when I am pressed on the Venetian food I most look forward to (and certainly the one I most associate with Venice), I must confess that it is tramezzini. I can never wait to get out in the morning and start looking for those triangles, overstuffed with every conceivable filling--salads of egg, tuna, crab, tiny shrimp salad, and mushrooms, various hams, roasted peppers, cheese, arugula, asparagus. I adore them. When I told this to a friend who'd just returned from Venice and was raving about all the fine restaurants she'd been to, she looked at me as though I'd suddenly grown tentacles. "Don't you get enough of mediocre finger sandwiches at bad office parties?"

It's weird because I don't generally like squishy white bread. (My husband gave me a similar looked when I asked him to pick up a loaf of the cottony white sandwich stuff at the supermarket.)

My tramezzino was not nearly as pretty as articshark's or RN's, and it didn't taste as good as they do in Venice (I guess you have to be there!), but I still enjoyed it. Very much. (I used OO-packed tuna, which I didn't drain, and the stipulated mayo, minced, red onion, and parsley for the tuna salad.)

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

Wow--that looks and sounds delicious. I'll have to try ordering cheeks.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

I used the next-to-lowest though I was just guessing. It worked really well.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

[CHICKEN] CACCIATORE, p. 178

Another (surprising) winner. I don't usually care much for cacciatore, always finding it heavy on bell pepper and entirely different from what I grew up on. (My mom's chicken cacciatore, authentic or not, was really good. Made with mushrooms and served with spaghetti, it was a family favorite.)

I'd have happily tried this recipe with rabbit, but DH, like BC, is bunny-averse, so we went with chicken (all drumsticks as DH is also attention-averse, and he grabbed drumsticks instead of thighs--but no matter, they were delicious).

This is actually a pretty easy weeknight meal--roughly twenty minutes of prep and then everything goes into the oven (1 1/4 hours for my drumsticks, just enough time for me to get in some exercise).

This recipe is similar to that for osso buco (except for the addition of olives here); the chicken braised in the tomato and aromatics results in a luscious sauce. DH wanted risotto as an accompaniment (and he made it!)--great choice, but this would work with any number of sides. With another side of steamed broccoli, this made for a beautiful meal.

I've had a rethink on cacciatore. I'll definitely come back to this.

Apr 29, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

That looks wonderful!

Apr 29, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

ASPARAGUS, TALEGGIO, & SPECK PIZZETTA, p. 73

My taleggio was also soft and, like that of LN and BC, nowhere near grate-able (I've never encountered any that was), but "slices" of it, grated cheapo mozzarella, and blanched asparagus pieces went onto the little slab of dough, which got baked on the stone, 5-6 minutes at 550F. The finished pizzetta was topped with speck and dribbled with EVOO before getting a generous grind of pepper. Delicious.

Apr 29, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

PROSCIUTTO & ROCKET PIZZETTA, p. 79

This has been my favorite pizza topping combination since I first had it at a wonderful Italian restaurant here in NOLA (Domenica). I call it "salad pizza" and always feel virtuous when I eat it. I made this as directed--and it did not disappoint.

What I did discover in making Polpa pizette is that I love the dough recipe! I make pizza at home often during the summer, almost always using the outdoor grill. I've tried numerous dough recipes without ever finding one I'm crazy for.

Crazy for this one, though: dough was pretty easy to handle and stretch (oh, and I did most of the kneading in the KA stand mixer, with the dough hook!), and in a 550F oven, on stone, the crust turned out thin and crisp (and nicely salted), just the way we like it.

My new go-to pizza crust dough. Yay!

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 6 & 7, Desserts & Drinks

Just wanted to report that I made this yet again, with a few drops of orange flower water and a blueberry compote this time. I thought this an excellent combination--loved the slight orange-y floral note to the panna cotta and it worked beautifully with blueberries.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

I take it from the success of your pizette that you had no issues with freezing your dough, BigSal. I'm getting ready to make some so I came back to see if anyone had mentioned freezing the dough--and voilà. (I've read mixed reviews on freezing different pizza doughs.)

Looking forward to my own pizzette.

Apr 28, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

Cannot believe it! Actual tramezzini bread! I have never seen such a thing.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

Damn--and I thought this thread was safe. Now blue room has convinced me I need this pan, and you practically push me to the cash register, LN.!

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

Im curious as to whether you have any ideas on improving this dish, Gio. I haven't made it again, but I remember thinking this might be good with a few olives or capers (or my ubiquitous parmigiano!), though I did love that oniony sauce. Maybe pangrattato?

Apr 28, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

FWIW, I buy more than I need when they are in season here and regularly freeze them, with no discernible difference (although I've never left them in the freezer for very long--at most, probably a couple of months.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

I love grilled fennel on its own. But when you have a chance, try the anchovies. The combination is amazing.

Apr 26, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapter 5, Vegetables

ASPARAGUS RISOTTO WITH PROSCIUTTO, p. 234

I'm in total agreement with previous posters, not that I had any doubts going into this one. Risotto is one of my favorite dishes, and we love asparagus, and prosciutto. DH generally wants more of a meat or seafood component (so I draped his bowl with three slices of prosciutto).

I scaled down the recipe for two. I blanched only the asparagus tips for topping the risotto and added the other asparagus pieces (ends peeled) directly into the pot with the rice (vialone nano type), for fear of their getting overcooked. By the time the risotto was done, the asparagus was perfectly cooked (albeit a dull green rather than the bright green of the blanched tips).

The only quibble I have with the method is the covering and resting at the end. Both times I've done this, the risotto, very loose before resting, had absorbed all the liquid by the time I served it. My preference is for a looser risotto. As it was absolutely delicious, this is a minor issue. Next time, I just won't cover it.

I liked the prosciutto on top but didn't need it. DH, on the other hand, thought it really elevated the dish (but he'd no doubt vote for prosciutto on top of any risotto).

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

We don't even generally like chicken breast, but thought this recipe was just wonderful--and I will make it again.

Polpo has been one of those books that has really surprised me. I knew it was beautiful, and it looked to contain some good recipes, but my initial thoughts after buying the book were that there were (1) many things that I didn't need a recipe for (like this one) or (2) several requiring ingredients unavailable to me (pigeon, octopus, monksbeard, scallops on the shell, ox or cod cheeks). I made one very simple cicheto and put the book on the shelf--until COTM. But what a revelation! I think I've made more recipes from this than any other COTM (or it's a close second), and been very happy with almost every one. Who knew a chicken cutlet could be so delicious?

So I'm sad to see this month end too.

By the way, DK, (OT but) Chef, Interrupted arrived yesterday, and I see many recipes I'm dying to try. So far, this looks like a really interesting book. I'm glad I ordered it.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapter 5, Vegetables

It looks fabulous!

Apr 23, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

Yes, those olives put the baby 'chokes in perspective!

May 2015 COTM: Voting Thread

I think you will be so pleased that you'll change that to "cookbook fairies"!

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapter 5, Vegetables

Glad you reminded me of this one. I'm always throwing away bread. (And on a bed of arugula sounds perfect.)

Apr 23, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 3 & 4, Fish & Meat

BEET-CURED SALMON, p. 130

When my husband saw me prepping this, he asked why in the world I wanted my salmon to look like raw beef when I've often remarked on the beautiful coral color of lox or smoked salmon. Add to this that the few times I've made my own gravlax, I haven't been thrilled with the results, and this may sound like a questionable undertaking. (Truth be told, I really love the color of beets and that aspect of this recipe intrigued me.) But when DH questions my sanity in the kitchen, as he is wont to from time to time, he often gets a stock response: yours is not to reason why; yours is just to enjoy the results.

And did he--did we! (So much that he went out in search of hand-made bagels this morning BEFORE his morning papers. Folks, that is something.) The result was a mildly-flavored gravlax, slightly peppery (I upped the pepper quite a bit), with vague hints of orange. I couldn't detect much beet (or dill) flavor, but I loved this nonetheless--my favorite home-made gravlax so far.

I made a half-recipe. After my 325g piece of salmon had languished in its salt-beet-orange zest-dill-pepper-vodka bath for 30 hours, it appeared to still need some time, and since I liked the way LN's looked, I decided I'd check again at 36. But I forgot about it, and it ended up curing for 42-43 hours. So it was deep red almost all the way through when I rinsed it of its cure (and looked a bit like dry-aged beef)

I am a truly lousy photographer, but, yes, those things that look like bacon strips are slices of the cured salmon. I'm also including photos of salmon pre-cure and washed, post-cure as well as one of the crostini I made with it last night.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapter 5, Vegetables

Zucchini [Spiral] Shoestring Fries, p. 215

Following MelMM's lead, I used my spiral slicer to make these fries. I do hate deep-frying, but I have to say that this treatment, which blue room has covered above, really transforms the humble zucchini. In fact, I think I like these better than shoestring potatoes. These disappeared very quickly.

Apr 21, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

May 2015 COTM Announcement: EAT by Nigel Slater

Thanks for all the effort, MelMM. I'll be able to find at lease a few from your links that I'll be willing to give a go.

Apr 21, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

April 2015 COTM: POLPO, chapters 6 & 7, Desserts & Drinks

Panna Cotta w/Blackberries, Take 2, p. 270

We were having guests for dinner so we needed dessert, right? I decided to try this again and thought it worth reporting since this time the panna cotta released their molds (custard cups) quite readily and turned out as intended.

First, I made these the day before and made a half-recipe (which yielded five servings). But the main change from my first attempt was that I upped the gelatin (10g bloomed in 2 T ice water), and this seemed to be just right. (An Italian man once told me that a perfect panna cotta should jiggle just a little, "like a woman's breast." I won't share some of the comments from others present that followed.)

I didn't have any vanilla beans but used vanilla (caster) sugar and stirred in 1/2 tsp vanilla with the grappa. I used the proper amount of sugar for the proportions this time (I accidentally doubled it last time) and found that I prefer this a bit sweeter so would add more sugar next time. Made the blackberry compote as directed.

These were a hit; one of my guests insisted I give her the recipe on the spot.

This is such a lovely, easy make-ahead dessert that I'm planning to make it again next week when we have guests in town for Jazz Fest, and I'm going to omit vanilla and use orange flower water in place of the grappa for flavoring.

April 2015 COTM: POLPO - Chapters 1 & 2, Cichèti & Breads

BRESAOLA, ROCKET & PARMESAN WRAP, p. 55

What a surprise hit: my husband and guests couldn't get enough of these and marveled at their simplicity.

Hardest thing about these was finding bresaola and getting the folks behind the counter to slice it thinly enough. Since it was pretty small in diameter, I had to overlap two slices and then use skewers so the rolls wouldn't fall apart. Just can't get over how delicious these were.

Apr 21, 2015
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking