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April 2014 COTM - Pok Pok: The One Plate Meal pg. 182-239, Foreign Foods pg. 240-251

Kai Kaphrao Khai Dao--Stir-fried [Pork] with Hot Basil, p. 189

I made this again (pork) a couple of nights ago, this time with the hot basil, but again subbing green beans for long. I'd forgotten that I'd dialed back the chiles by half last time and did the same this time--so still too spicy, especially for DH.

I'll be in Portland later this month and definitely will get to Pok Pok, but probably won't order this if it's on the menu because I'm sure the full heat would be more than even I can handle. Still, I'm going to try the recipe at least once more while my hot basil is thriving and remember to cut back on the chile even more.

Jul 10, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

July 2014 COTM: Radically Simple - Pasta, Fish

Lovely pasta!

Jul 07, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

No doubt something--or a couple of things--went wrong with mine. Next time, I'll try making a whole recipe in an the same pot.

*Another oops, I did use thighs, not breasts. And most of the fat came from the chicken so I suppose these were especially fatty breasts.

Jun 24, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

I agree that this dish (like many of these recipes) doesn't call out summer to me, but I wanted to try it nonetheless. This book would, I think, have been better suited to a fall or winter COTM.

Jun 24, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Ooops--I posted in the wrong place. Should have replied to Goblin.

Jun 24, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Chicken with Mustard (Poulet à la moutarde), p. 169

I wanted this to be my favorite recipe in the book. By all rights, it should have been, but this wasn't as soul-satisfying as I thought the sum of these particular parts would be. That said, my husband loved it. I will try again because I strongly suspect cook's error here.

I made half a recipe, but used a heavy, shallow LC pan (not sure of its correct name--braiser?) that would have been perfect for the whole recipe but was likely too large for four breasts and thus contributed to scorching, especially with my finely diced onion.

Mainly, I found this quite salty (not usually a problem for me) even though I used only 1/3 c diced bacon (all I had) for the half-recipe. The other problem was fat. After browning the chicken, I removed probably 3/4 cup but still ended up with a greasy "sauce" (mostly clumps of bacon, onion, and (what seemed like curdled) crème fraîche. I guess I was expecting something creamier. At any rate, mine did not look like that in delys's or rabaja's photos.

So I'll go back to the drawing board on this one.

Jun 24, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

What happened to my gumbo?

I always make roux this way--learned it from Prudhomme's first cookbook. It's done very quickly, but you must stir constantly. I like dark roux for gumbo, so I always use oil. And, yes, the roux continues to cook a bit after the veggies are added so it's important to add them before you get to the desired darkness.

To the OP: I add the roux mixture to boiling stock and then boil it (per Prudhomme's instructions) for 15 minutes and then simmer it another 10 or so. It never breaks.

Jun 23, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Yes--I have an old enamelled cast iron "flame tamer": it works great for such purposes.

Jun 23, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

What to do with a *lot* of chopped liver?

I can't be of much help other than to suggest that it's also nice on apple slices, but I have a feeling that's not what you're looking for. I would freeze it in small portions.

Jun 22, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

Cookbook of the Month March 2013 EVERY GRAIN OF RICE: Cold dishes, Tofu, Meat, Chicken and Eggs, Fish and Seafood

That looks heavenly, Joan. Every time I am in Atlanta I eat at the Buckhead Diner and always order the steamed sea bass, which seems very similar to this. It's about the only time I leave a restaurant feeling virtuous.

I occasionally see sea bass fillets here. Next time, I'll have to grab some and try this.

Jun 22, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Not at all. These:

http://orangette.blogspot.com/2005/02...

I made these with the recipe-stipulated turkey once, and they were very good, but with lamb they are divine so it has been lamb ever since. But all the chopping of raisins and pine nuts (and they really need to be chopped finely or the meatballs fall apart) is a PITB. The last time I made these I subbed pistachios for the pine nuts and, while still requiring fine chopping, they were just as good as the pine nuts in these meatballs.

A few years ago, I once brought these to a dinner at the home of some friends who often host casual get-togethers. Now every time they ask us over, the host asks me to bring these--and then adds how much his teenage daughter loves them. So they've become something of a curse. (And, wow, do those folks know how to play me.)

Jun 22, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Spiced Meatballs with Sriracha Sauce, p. 74

I made a half-recipe, with lamb (harissa in the meat mixture), and opted to sauté them in a non-stick pan. The one I tasted, fresh out of the pan, was juicy and delicious, but like MelMM, I had to hold the others (in a warm oven) so they were a bit dried out upon serving.

Mayo fiend that I am, I served them with the sriracha mayo (what looks like mustard in my photo).

We enjoyed these very much, loved the spices, and, yes, they are very merguez-ish. Although they haven't supplanted my favorite lamb meatballs, they're much easier so there's a good chance I will revisit this recipe.

Jun 21, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Lovely. (I am intrigued by that corn and potato salad, too, bear.)

Jun 16, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

I wouldn't say you can't taste the olives, but they are not pronounced, which I was expecting. Maybe a more assertive olive would work better. Or maybe more than 1/3 cup? I used Moroccan oil-cured because I really like them, had them on hand, and also because they're not really wet/briny (DL says the olives should be somewhat "dry").

We had these with hummus last night, and they were fine vehicles for that. But, for me anyway, they're nothing special on their own.

Jun 16, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Another one I have tabbed. Now I put a star on the tab.
I'll bet the leftovers make great sandwiches.

Jun 16, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Beautiful plate, mc.

That recipe is one I have planned for this week.

Jun 16, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

Your best CRISPY, CRUNCHY cookie recipe. Go!

Just made these. Very crisp and very delicious.

http://dujour.com/article/duck-fat-co...

Jun 15, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Desserts (Les desserts), Pantry (Ingrédients de base)

No, not at all. (Also, I didn't use duck fat that was seasoned. Not sure how garlicky, herby duck fat would do in this recipe.)

These are rich, but the butter is muted. I think what the duck fat contributes is crispness; it also seems to put the butter in the background.

When I wrote my review, I had only tasted a cookie that was not completely cooled. On a subsequent visit to the cookie jar, I found that they were very crisp, in a good way. Dangerous. (So glad I froze the second roll. I hope I can forget it exists.)

I love the bits of dried cherries in them, and I'll bet dried cranberries would be excellent, too. These would make lovely holiday cookies.

Jun 15, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
3

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Desserts (Les desserts), Pantry (Ingrédients de base)

Duck Fat Cookies (Sablés à la Graisse de Canard), p. 297

Ok, so I had all necessary ingredients and decided to take one for the team. (Listening, Torina?)

These are fabulous, probably the best sablés I’ve ever had—delicate and sandy yet somehow slightly unctuous with a little pop of tart.

And very easy: ¼ cup of dried cherries in my case are heated gently with 1 T of cognac (Armanac and brandy are other options) until they absorb all the liquid. While they are cooling, cream very briefly 4 T butter (softened) and 6 T duck fat (cold) and ¾ c sugar. Mix in ½ tsp vanilla. Dump in 1¼ c AP flour (whisked first w/¾ tsp sea salt) and mix just until dough comes together. Knead briefly on floured surface and pat into a rectangle. Halve that and roll the dough into cylinders and wrap w/plastic wrap. Chill.

Even after this dough is chilled, it is very soft, a little hard to slice, especially with the bits of dried fruit. I had to pat several of these into rounds. But they baked up fine. At 350F, they took 16 minutes (rather than 10) to get them just barely browned on top.

I really hope my husband will eat most of these quickly as they’ll be hard for me to resist.

Jun 15, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
3

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Desserts (Les desserts), Pantry (Ingrédients de base)

Gorgeous!

I have that recipe tabbed, so will take your notes to heart. Did you use fresh or dried bay leaves? Any ideas out there about which might offer up more flavor/scent?

Jun 15, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Salted Olive Crisps (Croquet Salés aux Olives), p. 42

These intrigued me so I whipped up a batch. Very easy: 1/2 c ea AP flour and WW flour (I used white WW), 1 T sugar, 1/2 tsp ea dried thyme, sea salt, baking soda, and black pepper are whisked together; then 1 c of buttermilk is stirred in, followed by 1/3 c ea. coarsely chopped almonds and pitted olives (I used the Moroccan oil-cured, which I rolled around in paper towels to "dry").

Just after I dumped the dough into the loaf pan (it barely covered the bottom), I realized I'd left out the sugar, so I made a second batch with the sugar.

Both loaves, after baking for 30 minutes at 350F, came out as very flat loaves, but they looked about as they do in DL's photos. Once cooled, the loaves were sliced thinly, slices laid out on baking sheets and baked again at 325F for 30-35 minutes, flipping and turning midway through the baking. (BTW, I think freezing the loaves would make the slicing easier. I do that when making similar cranberry-hazelnut crisps.)

The crackers with the sugar did taste slightly better than those without, but the truth is, these were rather meh. Oddly, the olives weren't very pronounced. I can't imagine really enjoying these as they are with a glass of wine. I did spread them with some leftover herbed goat cheese (p.110), and that was tasty. And these would probably be delicious as the base of those crostini, spread with the cheese, and dabbed with some of the roasted cherry tomato. But without some kind of spread that goes with olives, I don't think these are all that enjoyable . . . .So I'm unlikely to make these again, easy as they are.

Jun 15, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
1

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Caramel Pork Ribs (Travers de Porc au Caramel) p. 187

Yes, these were very good. DH ate several helpings!

I followed the recipe, except that since I had 6 lbs of ribs, I did 1½ X the recipe. I ended up with a lot of sauce after two hours in the oven (covered). I let the ribs go another half hour and the sauce reduced a bit. Like Joan, I had a LOT of fat in the pan. I spooned most of it off and then cooked the sauce on top of the stove to reduce it some more. Unlike Joan's, mine was very thin, even after reducing, quite pourable. So I poured the sauce over the platter of ribs.

Great oven ribs. Had them with corn and salad, after hummus, and before blueberry cobbler. The Farmers Market is overflowing with abundance these days, and I have no will power.

Jun 13, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
2

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Hummus, p. 60

I made this to have with drinks before our rib-sticking rib dinner last night; had to double my workout this morning!

The recipe is pretty standard: I started with a cup of dried chick peas, soaked all day. They cooked for two hours with a 1/2 tsp baking soda in 3X their volume of water at a "low boil," a tad too long as it was hard to pick out the skins after draining and rinsing the cooked peas.

But the mushy peas, whizzed with 9 T tahini, 2 T fresh lemon juice (DL suggests 4 tsp; I like mine lemony), 2 garlic cloves (I used the microplane grater), 2 tsp salt (kosher), and a few T of cooking liquid, yielded a very smooth result. I was "unrestrained" pouring olive oil on top. I also tossed on toasted pine nuts and sprinkled the whole generously with sumac. I then made a little well in the middle for a mix of chopped roasted jalapeno and lemon juice, which I love.

So, yes, this was delicious (and hearty). But every time I make my own hummus, I think that it's no better than the freshly made quart I can get for 5.99 (with toppings) at a Middle Eastern restaurant/market less than a mile from here. And since I went there anyway to buy their freshly baked pita to go with my hummus, making it seemed like an especially pointless exercise. But if you're not so lucky, this is perfectly nice.

Jun 13, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: First Courses (Entrées), Sides (Accompagnements

Fattoush, p. 116

I served this as a side for our fish last night. Like Gio, I left out the pita (as we'd just had mushrooms on ciabatta toasts as a starter). Baby romaine had to stand in for Little Gem lettuce, but the straight-from- the-farmer's market veggies and my just-picked herbs married beautifully with the lemony dressing and sumac. Very refreshing. I'm sure I'll be repeating this often.

Jun 12, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking
2

October 2102 COTM: 660 Curries -- Legume Curries, Vegetable Curries

That is one beautiful plate!

Jun 11, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

OK, moving up on the list!

Jun 11, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

Nominations Thread: Cookbook of the Month July 2014

This probably won't make COTM but that review (and the Keralon chicken) are driving me straight to Costco for the book.

Jun 11, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Appetizers (Mis-en bouche)

Oh, how I love pissaladière! This is on my list (although DH does not share my enthusiasm). Yours looks lovely.

Jun 11, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: Main Courses (Plats)

Chicken Lady Chicken (Poulet Crapaudine Façon Catherine), p. 173

My turn on the CL chicken: I marinated the spineless bird for 12 hours and then cooked it outside on the grill, under a foil-wrapped brick--10 minutes breast-side down then flipped and cooked probably another 20 minutes. When I first checked it after 5 minutes, it was already charring from flare-ups so I moved it to a cooler part of the grill and monitored it pretty closely thereafter.

We enjoyed this. The marinade really gave the chicken great flavor, and I'd use that again. I don't know how often I'd do this whole recipe. The spatchcocking was easy enough, but I rarely cook whole birds as we are partial to dark meat here. It would be a good option for guests. I am looking forward to sandwiches made from the leftover breast meat though.

Jun 11, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking

June 2014 COTM - My Paris Kitchen: First Courses (Entrées), Sides (Accompagnements

Cherry Tomato Crostini w/Homemade Herbed Goat Cheese, p. 110

While my crostini didn't look as stunning as sfspicegirl's--I had mixed cherry tomatoes that were mostly yellow, orange , and brownish--they were utterly delicious.

My tomatoes were so good fresh that I was hesitant to stick them in the oven, but something magical happened as they mingled with sliced garlic (I used two cloves for 1/2 lb. tomatoes), herbs (chives, thyme, sage, rosemary), olive oil, salt and pepper during their 45-minute roast. The result was almost jammy, caramelized, herby, sweet. Atop the herbed cheese on the oiled and garlic-rubbed ciabatta toasts--heaven.

The homemade cheese was so easy: strained goat yogurt is mixed with minced shallot, minced garlic, minced herbs (chives, parsley, thyme, sage), salt, and cayenne--perfect as a tangy counterpart to the tomatoes. I think this would be a terrific dip/spread for crudites if you're watching carbs. If you're not, it would be great on toasts even absent the tomatoes. But do yourself a favor and make the whole recipe! (For a quickie version of the cheese, labneh would work very well.)

Jun 10, 2014
nomadchowwoman in Home Cooking