g

goldangl95's Profile

Title Last Reply

Communal dining in SF?

Lazy Bear. Pricey though.

Late Night Eats In SF

Call ahead! Sometimes they'll close the kitchen early if it's a slow night etc.

Restaurants near Union Square [San Francisco]

What type of food?

Gitane and/or Cafe Claude and/or Kin Khao is my typical answer.

Fifth anniversary coming up - Please help me plan a meal that I can cook for my girlfriend.

Limit what you need to make fresh while she is there to one course.

Everything else should be something you made ahead of time and can keep cool in the fridge or warmed on a stovetop or oven.

This serves 2 purposes - if you run out of time and have to ditch a course you will know before she gets there instead of ditching it in front of her. 2 you can actually enjoy your time together.

We usually do a cold appetizer. A warm appetizer. A veggie dish. A protein. Dessert. The only thing made in the guests presence is either the veggie dish or the protein.

Jan 28, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking
1

Favorite Filipino and Indian restaurants

Dosa on Fillmore for something more upscale. Gajalee for more hole in the wall.

Palo Alto search

I like Palo Alto Sol fine . Tacolicious and Delfina are OK.

Da Sichuan is good for hole in the wall Chinese.

Reposado, Jin sho, Evvia, Tamarine, and Lure + Till are all fine though pricey.

Mediterranean wraps and Oren's hummus shop are good for a quick bite.

It is an underwhelming area.

White truffle paste?

You can put it on a flatbread type dish. Truffles are considered a strong and expensive flavor that shouldn't be tainted with a lot of other tastes which is why it's usually used with cream and that's about it. Proteins, herbs and spices mess with the taste.

If you do find an unusual way to use the paste, do report back!

Jan 27, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Sushi Sam's - My First Time, But Not My Last [San Mateo]

If I remember right the Uni was from Mendocino and it was excellent. Clean and creamy.

Sushi Sam's - My First Time, But Not My Last [San Mateo]

Went for an omakase sashimi lunch the other day. Stand outs:

- Baby Sardine
- Uni
- Sweet shrimp

Note! If you find the regular seasoning/saucing overdone get the sashimi platter. Cuts are generous without being unwieldy and they still provide the toppings they are just on the side.

They had flown more fish in than I remember from previous visits. The flown in fish, unfortunately, was a bit too cold and so the texture was off and flavors were muted.

Also if you care about visual presentation, a couple cuts were a bit creative in shape as if they had avoided a bad spot or wanted to use up a piece. Didn't affect the taste.

I as others have stated, find this a great, consistent place (though super busy at dinner time).

Tasting menus in the peninsula under $100

Please do report back! As shown by this thread, there is a lack of reporting south of us, and I will be the first to admit that for higher end dining I tend to head north instead of south.

Anybody know good sushi places south of San Francisco?

All I am saying is that I wouldn't feel comfortable offering up Sushi Tomi as a place to eat sushi for a visitor. I've been there during lunch on weekends, and then dinner at various times after 6 p.m. I've had to wait every single time (except one time where I went lunch on a weekend right when they opened).

I also wouldn't offer up a place to a one time/occasional visitor where you have to have an in/be chatty with the sushi chef. This is true lots of places to get the best cuts (what I mean by time honored - sushi chefs often reserve special cuts for friends of the restaurant). But I don't feel comfortable going to places or recommending places where your only guarantee of quality is that relationship.

It takes effort to eat at off times, it takes effort to eat in downtown MV unless you are staying/working right there. Sushi Tomi is IMHO not worth the effort as your one shot. If you live in the area as I assume we both do, then of course it may be. But not for a visitor.

Anybody know good sushi places south of San Francisco?

World standards = if you are not from the country of origin, you would be content eating there. Not blown away - just content.

That's my standard for most recommendations I make on this board and Sushi Tomi falls short of that. I think even if you were already in Mountain View, there's a high chance a sushi lover would be disappointed by Sushi Tomi - let alone if you drove there for any distance, or carved out time in your schedule to go.

I realize that cozying up to the sushi chef is a time honored tradition - it just isn't in my personality - so unfortunately I will not be trying Sawa. Hopefully someone else will though!

Carmelizing Onions in the Oven for Indian recipes

Here is a video of what they look like:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qUchcSa...

Jan 26, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Carmelizing Onions in the Oven for Indian recipes

There are a few N Indian recipes that call for sweet soft onions reminiscent of the ones in western cuisine. It is not in my limited experience called for in many curries but the goal is to turn the onions from sharp to sweet.

Jan 26, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Dinner for 9 for under $1500 [San Francisco]

Perbacco is a great choice call them and see. If they can't accommodate, Zuni or Boulevard may work though I don't think they have private spaces and are louder.

Avant garde, modernist, quirky recs?

I'd bump lazy bear the setting/format is innovative but I found the food more straight Californian/new American than particularly modernist.

Tasting menus in the peninsula under $100

All spice does a tasting menu for $100.

Indian Cooking Tips and Recipes

Good point re carmelized onions and use of dal. I have been trying to expand my Indian cooking skills to other regions. Do you have any recipe references you find useful? Also is there a way to know which Punjabi curries require full carmelization of onions vs a more lightly sautéed brown? Because I have seen both used.

I am trying to think of a rule of thumb for dal. If it says soak overnight and takes ~ 30 whistles to fully complete they are probably using whole dal and if it is soaked only for a few hours and cooked for far less whistles probably split ?

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

How do korean fried chicken places get their chicken to have that "ballooned" look?

Good point. In this case I meant Kentucky.

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

How do korean fried chicken places get their chicken to have that "ballooned" look?

Yes I believe there has been influence by the KFC pressure cooking method when creating their methods. Could be wrong though.

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Why do Vietnamese restaurants close early?

Yup like big wheel said - If they are serving Vietnamese customers , they have pho for breakfast/lunch same with banh mi. Think of it like the equivalent of a breakfast/lunch diner, or sandwich shop.

Indian Cooking Tips and Recipes

So each Indian website seems to have different whistle information so it varies widely. I usually look at a few dal recipes from the same source average the whistles and then look at the western chart. So if the average is 3 whistles and the chart says 3 minutes than 1 whistle = 1 minute.

I've found if the pressure cooker is on high a whistle often equals about 2 minutes if the dal has been soaked. But unfortunately takes some experimentation to get right.

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Indian Cooking Tips and Recipes

Yes if anyone tries the recipes from the website I listed the author is talking in Indian spicy levels (Kerala spicy levels) which are pretty darn spicy especially fresh chilies.

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Indian Cooking Tips and Recipes

Which patak's curry pastes do you like best?

Yes some of the commercial garlic/ginger pastes are pretty bad. Luckily there is a lot of choice in my area so there are some that aren't loaded up on preservatives and salt.

I would say bad indian food is the result of death by a thousand cuts. Almost everyone takes one shortcut or two because the process is so involved, but with each shortcut the flavors mute a bit and the curry often gets watery/slides off the main ingredients. Once you are pre-making and freezing everything it's just better to use commercial paste or frozen food instead.

Jan 23, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Italian on the Peninsula or South Bay

Donato Enoteca is decently good.

Carmelizing Onions in the Oven for Indian recipes

I'm with everyone else on the no to adding garlic/ginger. The problem with adding garlic/ginger is that the pieces are much smaller and have much less water. They burn very quickly and you can't check every couple minutes if they are in the oven. They are also supposed to be a bit fresher in flavor than the onions.

Did you notice any difference in flavor texture in oven vs stovetop?

Jan 22, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

What are some of your favorite kitchen tricks that you'd be hesitant to admit to foodies?

Started a post here, I am of limited use as I'm not super curious about Indian cooking and stick to a couple regions but hopefully other people jump in =)

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1002894

Jan 22, 2015
goldangl95 in Home Cooking

Indian Cooking Tips and Recipes

I know what I've picked up over the years, but I am no expert on this subject nor am I a huge stickler for authenticity as long as it tastes amazing =) But hoping to share tips and recipes and get some good online sources. What have you learned? Any good recipe sources?

The backbone of my cooking is home food and this website: http://www.vazhayila.com/p/recipe-ind...

She is not the best recipe writer (ingredients listed in the wrong order, occasionally steps left out), but has a great variety of recipes from Kerala. When she says something is hot or spicy it is very hot or spicey by American standards:

To this some tips (Indian cooking is rather involved unfortunately):

1. Onions are the most important step to curries. The onions need to be cut to a uniform size and then cooked hot enough so that they get soft and slightly browned, but not so hot that they burn.

If you are using a lot of onions, add them slowly and see how they cook before dumping them all in. Also once they are in the pot, they can take forever to get soft. But you want them soft and slightly browned (if they are crunchy it makes for a lumpy texture). If you use a food processor to chop the onions, make sure to drain any liquid thoroughly before cooking.

If the onions are taking a long time, you may need to add more oil to the pot.

2. Every household has their own garam masala recipe, and that is the one spice blend that many home cooks bother to do the whole process themselves (sun dry the spices - or oven bake - or sautee on a pan briefly and then grind). Different regions vary dramatically on what spices are used. Garam masala is often tossed in towards the end and therefore the uniqueness/freshness matters more.

3. You can use pre-made garlic/ginger paste (available in Indian stores or you can make your own) instead of crushing garlic and ginger yourself. It does compromise the flavor some, but the garlic/ginger is less essential than the onions.

4. When you add whole spices or spice powders to the pot, there needs to be enough oil in the pot so that the spices cook in the oil and don't just sink and burn at the bottom. Let the spices cook and jump (if whole spices) or darken before moving on to the next step.

5. Once everything's added, the main ingredient (meat or vegetables) usually are done before the curry comes together. The spices often need to simmer for a really long time before they start integrating and stop tasting 'raw.'The more you follow #4 the less of an issue this will be, but this is often why the meat in Indian food gets overcooked.

6. Always buy split dal. When a recipe mentions dal, they are almost never talking about whole dal. Also if you have an electric pressure cooker instead of a stovetop pressure cooker, I've found this chart useful for trying to convert 'whistles' to minutes:

https://fastcooking.ca/pressure_cooke...

7. Don't forget the salt! It's easy to forget, and the curry tastes dull without it.

8. If the curry is too spicy, you can add potato, milk or coconut milk to try and take the spicy-ness level down.

9. If it is a curry - it will taste even better the next day.

Anybody know good sushi places south of San Francisco?

Coming back to this late. I will say if no one explains what is on the omakase - that is not a good sign. You should be told what variety and from where each piece is coming from.

A lot of white fishes especially can look very similar - almost no one is enough of an expert to call what species and from where based on looks.

Sorry OP about your disappointing experience at Sushi Tomi. It is mediocre by world standards but there isn't much available in the Bay Area to my eternal dismay.

Will have to try Seto.

What are some of your favorite kitchen tricks that you'd be hesitant to admit to foodies?

Lots of Indian home cooks do this as well. No it doesn't quite have the same bite and loses it's bite/flavor decently rapidly as exosed to air but so easy and reduces the absurd amount of chopping time for curries.