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where to buy goat meat in Brooklyn

In the US, mutton is adult, eg older, meat from sheep. notably stronger and usually described as an acquired taste. it is nearly impossible to find in a typical market as most US buyers prefer the milder taste of lamb.

Aug 16, 2007
1030Bourbon in Outer Boroughs

In New Orleans on business, dining alone..

If you are staying in the Quarter then I'd say NOLA because you can walk there. Make a reservation for the Chef's Bar. It is going to be French Quarter Festival so it will be busier than usual. There will be great food opportunities at the Fest--you can check it out at NOMENU.com. A cab ride away would be Cochon and Rio Mar, both very good. You could eat at the bar at Cochon. Cochon is interpreted Cajun food, very good and imaginative; Rio Mar is Latin-inflected fish. You might want a reservation at Rio Mar. Ask the waiter to call you a cab back to the Quarter (or wherever). They're used to it.

Apr 11, 2007
1030Bourbon in New Orleans

Willie Mae's Scotch House Open

I think it's closed Sunday and Monday. I am going Friday so I'll find out and post.

Apr 11, 2007
1030Bourbon in New Orleans

Dooky and Willie Mae

Dooky Chase isn't open yet. Willie Mae opened last week. It is open from about 11 to 3.

Apr 10, 2007
1030Bourbon in New Orleans

2 meals in NoLa

I'm in New Orleans 30 to 40 nights a year. Here is my two cents. If you take the level of cooking at Del Posto or Felidia as a comparison, they you are talking about August or Gautreau in New Orleans. I have not eaten at Stella! since before Katrina so I don't know how it is, but it gets enough great mentions that I'm going to eat there at Jazzfest. I eyed the menu a week ago and it's really imaginative. If it lives up to its potential, then Stella! is up there, too.

All of those are white tablecloth restaurants.

Next, I'd throw in Galatoir's and Arnand, both very old-fashioned places.

Then I would add Cochon. It's been open a year and I have been there half a dozen times. It's interpreted Cajun food and extremely inventive and good. It's comfortable and the winelist has improved a lot since they opened (many restaurants have had short winelists when they opened as a cost control--all the wine that was in New Orleans before Katrina got "cooked" after the storm because the power was off for months).

After that I'd say NOLA, Emeril's less-formal restaurant in the Quarter.

And now it's anybody's guess. There are a lot of restaurants that are good including Upperline, the Rib Room, and others. I have been to NOLA twice in the last six months--once very good and once disappointing though they were slammed the night I was disappointed.

If you want a unique informal lunch then you should try Casamento's for oysters or an oysterloaf or softshell or shrimp sandwich.

The most interesting new place is definitely Cochon. They're up for best new restaurant in the country by the Beard Association.

By the way I strongly disagree with Brightsen's as a first-time suggestion. It's an out of the way spot frequented by locals and I ate there recently but was sorry I had gone. It's stuck in a style of cooking that came out of Commander's and K-Paul 20 years or so ago. It has not evolved at all. They did ok cooking, but the recipes were not imaginative at all. I'd not waste a meal in New Orleans there.

One other place that's close to the Quarter that'w worth considering is Rio Mar, a seafood place owned by Alex Garcia. It's very good latin-influenced fish. He also owns an Argentine steakhouse called La Boca but I haven't been there yet. Friends say it's really good.

Apr 10, 2007
1030Bourbon in New Orleans

Willie Mae's Scotch House Open

Sunday night, April 1, Southern Foodways Alliance sponsored a celebration at Rio Mar to turn over the keys to Willie Mae Seaton, owner of the just-restored Willie Mae's Scotch House. The restaurant opened the next day, serving many of the volunteers and contributors who had been at the Rio Mar dinner and who helped rebuild her home and restaurant. The restaurant is open now; I had to go out of town so I wasn't able to eat there last week but will, I hope, this weekend.

Willie Mae's Scotch House
2401 St. Ann St.
822-9503
And check out Southern Foodways' website: http://www.southernfoodways.com

A video from last year from the NOVCB on the restoration efforts:
http://www.neworleanscvb.com/static/i...

Apr 09, 2007
1030Bourbon in New Orleans

Anyone have a clue about Al Pastor?

here's a link for anyone living in a Mexican-food deprived region. I have no interest in this place, have not used them and therefor caveat emptor. but if i lived now where i did much of my life, i'd like knowing about it:

www.mexgrocer.com

Jan 14, 2007
1030Bourbon in Home Cooking

Anyone have a clue about Al Pastor?

right, more or less. in Spanish, shepherd is translated from English as "pastor". There is a conical reflector contraption that's placed next to a fire AND an actual old fashioned spit. They are interpretations with the common element being thinly sliced marinated meat (often pork but properly lamb or goat).

what it isn't (really) is meat roasted al horno--whole in a pot in an oven. properly it's roasted against a fire.

but whatever method, seasoned meat against a fire is good.

Jan 11, 2007
1030Bourbon in Home Cooking

Anyone have a clue about Al Pastor?

Pastor means "shepherd" in Spanish; "al pastor" means "in the style of the shepherd". Originally it described meat that was marinated raw, then sliced thinly, and roasted on a cone placed near the campfire.

Today as generally done it's simple marinated meat, often pork, that's sliced thin and cooked on a hot griddle, then rolled in tortillas with garnishes such as marinated onion, avocado, pico, etc. The meat should be sliced across the grain so it is tender and almost falls apart. It's cooked until it's well browned but not burnt.

Jan 10, 2007
1030Bourbon in Home Cooking

It's Crawfish Season

Crawfish season is from Christmas to July 4, more or less. True local crawfish are always live when they are boiled; imported crawfish, usually from Asia (especially China) are frozen. There is a definite taste and texture difference. Local frozen crawfish clearly state that they are from Louisiana (there are packagers who refreeze imported crawfish so it's important to read the package). These frozen tails are for making cooked dishes such as etoufees. They can also be fried but not boiled.

Dec 19, 2006
1030Bourbon in New Orleans