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Where to buy FORTUNA garlic press

DOES ANYONE KNOW WHERE TO BUY ONE? I just struck out again at a big cooking store with lots of different presses. The FORTUNA is the BEST garlic press, so easy to use and to clean and to store. It's far superior to any other I've seen. It's faster and easier than a knife. It's an ingenious design, efficient yet very simple, compact , and light.

In addition to the label "FORTUNA, A. Ahner, Austria," mine says "Made in Italy" on the other handle. I bought mine 25 years ago in a cooking store in Berkeley. I've been sporadically looking to replace it for a dozen years, ever since my then toddler dropped it from his highchair onto the floor, breaking off a bit of the smashing grill, making it a bit less efficient.

Caroline has written on this site: "To my great amazement, I can't find a garlic press even similar to mine anywhere on the internet! It's made of some sort of almost shiny cast metal, and inside one of the heavy handles it says, "FORTUNA, A Ahner Austria." It really is quite ingenious and convenient. You close the handles to press the garlic, pull them far apart to ream it clean. I bought it in the sixties or early seventies, and for back then, it was fairly expenisve... About ten bucks, as I recall. After looking at all the models available today, I'm feeling really lucky! Does anyone else have an old garlic press anything like this? " & in another post she wrote:
"My garlic press has to be at least forty years old, maybe close to fifty? It's a "Fortuna" from Austria, and I love it. It's quite heavy [thick, not weighty], cast aluminum, and It has a non-detachable cleaner built in as part of the handle. A quick rinse under running water, flip the handle back to clean the holes of the press of any remnants of peels [or just garlic fiber], and it's good as new. Since aluminum is rust proof, I just rinse and return it to the drawer where it lives."

Jim has written in response: "I found this site while doing a patent search for the garlic press you own. I saw them about 30 years ago and bought all 6 that the store had, which I distributed to my sisters, mother, myself and a couple friends. I have never seen another like it since.
By flapping it rapidly under running water right soon after using, it takes all of 3 seconds to completely clean it of all fiber and residue. All the ones I bought are still actively in service, though no longer shiny by any means."

Dear Caroline & also Jim, & all readers,
I also love my FORTUNA garlic press for the same reasons and because the area the garlic is smashed is enclosed on only 3 sides, leaving one side open for the garlic fiber not pressed through the holes to be easily swiped out with the back of a dinner knife (or anything else) into whatever you're cooking. So quick and easy and doesn't waste a bit of garlic!
Ingrid

Mar 14, 2009
yogrid in Cookware

garlic press--am I doing something wrong, or is this a wasteful tool?

Dear Caroline & also Jim,
I also love my FORTUNA garlic press for the same reasons and because the area the garlic is smashed is enclosed on only 3 sides, leaving one side open for the garlic not pressed through the holes to be easily swiped out with the back of a dinner knife (or anything else) into whatever you're cooking. It's an ingenious design and very simple, compact , and light.
I bought mine 25 years ago in a cooking store in Berkeley. I've been sporadically looking to replace it for a dozen years, ever since my then toddler dropped it on the floor, breaking off a bit of the smashing grill, making it a bit less efficient. DOES ANYONE KNOW WHERE TO BUY ONE? I just struck out at Sur La Table. It is the BEST garlic press, so easy to use and to clean and to store. It's faster and easier than a knife.

In addition to the label "FORTUNA A Ahner Austria," mine says "Made in Italy" on the other handle.

Mar 14, 2009
yogrid in Cookware