Chinon00's Profile

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My take on Paris Bistro in Chestnut Hill

I've never been to a brasserie at home or abroad that wasn't noisy.

about 6 hours ago
Chinon00 in Philadelphia

Ketchup on Hot Dogs

Currywurst

about 8 hours ago
Chinon00 in General Topics

Ketchup on Hot Dogs

You mix ketchup w/ mustard?

about 16 hours ago
Chinon00 in General Topics

What foods go with beer?

What's your assessment of hop bitterness and fried food?

Aug 19, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

What foods go with beer?

How about high alcohol beers w/ firm hop bitterness like west coast (I)IPAs, or Imperial Stout?

Aug 16, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

wine pairings for cigars

Recently got into cigars and have been reading books and watching videos online to learn more. I watched a video today about pairing wine w/ cigars. During the video the gentleman blew cigar smoke directly into his glass of Shiraz, placed his hand over the glass and swirled and for a good long time it appeared. He then raised his hand off the glass allowing all the smoke to escape first and took a sip. He went on to discuss the success of this marriage. So I tried it w/ an inexpensive Cabernet. It worked well, for me anyway. The lingering woody, peppery, smoke aroma blended well w/ the fat fruit of the wine.

Aug 15, 2014
Chinon00 in Wine

What foods go with beer?

I can appreciate all your exceptions except high alcohol beers. Can you further explain?

Aug 15, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

What foods go with beer?

Due to the carbonation in beer I'd say the generally fried food is a good match for all beer.

Aug 14, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

German food - undeserved bad reputation

I wouldn't say that Italian and Mexican have reputations of being as protein driven as German cuisine.

Aug 11, 2014
Chinon00 in General Topics

What words/adjectives are used to describe taste of cider?

Depends on which you choose. Something very simple like Woodchuck cider will taste like carbonated apple juice. Very straightforward. French ciders (cidre) will have more earthy, musty, funky, barnyard, complex flavor and drier. English ciders tend be more balanced, round w/o being cloying.

Jul 31, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

London’s 10 Most Important Restaurants for Visitors- Richard Vines (Bloomberg)

To be clear are you equating restaurants which "are game changers that start trends and spawn imitators" w/ "trendy" restaurants?

Jul 28, 2014
Chinon00 in U.K./Ireland

Would you add parmesan cheese to lobster risotto?

The "rule" w/ regard to seafood in Italian cooking is to never add cheese as it's strong flavor masks the delicate flavor of the fish. However you can do whatever you like.
And what is your concern w/ using 100% lobster stock in the risotto?

Jul 26, 2014
Chinon00 in Home Cooking

Stone in Berlin

So is craft beer in Berlin basically small batch, local, well made traditional styles (pilsner, marzen, dunkel) or is there more brewing of international styles and experimentation? Which is more common?

Jul 22, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Stone in Berlin

Which beers are those?

Jul 22, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Stone in Berlin

How does one sell Belgian beers in Germany such as fruit beers, beers brewed w/ candied sugar, etc?

Jul 22, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Stone in Berlin

Ok so can Stone make a noticeable and positive contribution to the Berlin craft beer scene in your opinion?

Jul 22, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Stone in Berlin

How does Stone brewing in Berlin harm the local craft breweries?

Jul 21, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Hold up so pilsner, porter, stout and IPA aren't styles either?

Jul 16, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Would it be fair to say that these beers (enkel, dubbel and tripel) are distinguished by strength rather than style?

Jul 15, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

So what is the name for Trappist beer stronger than a Tripel?

Jul 15, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Well I could really understand your strong feelings if through our influence we Americans were changing the recipes of the beers you love. We'd be robbing you of your beer and history. But we, to the contrary adore the beers of Belgium as they are and do our best to brew them like Belgians (utterly not to your satisfaction we know).
I don't see how categorizing them (incorrectly) takes away from your drinking pleasure or why it disturbs you so profoundly.

Jul 13, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer
2

Beer myths, part 1

But the beers haven't changed in 70 years. None of these American beer organizations or websites existed 70 years ago. This beer we like and mistakenly call quadrupel predates everything.

Jul 13, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer
1

Beer myths, part 1

"There are brewers outside the US who will quite happily sell their beers in the US and will name them and/or brew them according to what they read on the BJCP site or RB or BA."

But the most popular "quadrupel" (sorry) style beers in the US outdate BJCP, RB, BA and the entire American craft beer movement by decades and decades (i.e. Westvleteren 12, Rochefort 10 and St Bernardus).
This style that we American wrongly call quadrupel isn't some bastardized American concoction, the recipes for these beers are purely a European creation aren't they?

Jul 13, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer
1

Beer myths, part 1

Well for one their experience w/ wine is growing and changing (much like it is in the United States). It's a function of education and travel. So w/ their feet firmly under themselves now and w/ more experience Brits seeking out and making specific higher end purchases.
So I can imagine a Brit reading about a particular food and wine pairing or traveling to Spain and having a wine and desiring to replicate that at home as closely as possible or seeking out that experience again while traveling.

Jul 13, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

You aren't the object of my observation other Brits and Europeans I've met are.
Here's recent analysis from a market research firm in regard to trends in British wine consumption:
"...wine drinking is becoming increasingly popular in the UK, which is traditionally not a wine drinking country. Consumers have become increasingly sophisticated thanks to more education on the different types of wine and its combination with food and as a result of increasing international travel to southern Europe and other traditional wine drinking regions. Consumers are opting for quality over quantity, as demonstrated by the fact that value sales were up but volumes stagnated over the review period."
- http://www.euromonitor.com/wine-in-th...

So through education and travel at least the British consumer's taste are changing and honing onto more specific higher end purchases.

Jul 12, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

"And, if you want a particular French wine [in Belgium], you either have to go to the region where it is produced or you may have to buy a bottle of a commercial version which is shipped to Paris."
- ThomasvanDale

Well, isn't that "searching" too?

Jul 11, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

I think the word we are looking for is connoisseurship. In regard to beer, while your typical German loves beer he loves HIS beer (whatever his regional beer might be) and is not at all interested in unlocking the mysteries of British or American ale. While on the otherhand an American craft drinker is often quite the opposite. We want to figure it all out and experiment. Same is true I've found of Brits, US etc wine drinkers, again due to our historical relationship w/ wine.

Jul 11, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

For sure. Wine isn't an integral part of US, Dutch, British, etc culture. My point is people from non-traditional wine growing countries treat wine more like a hobby. So a Brit or American wine drinker might come to France and be initially surprised (as I was) that there wasn't the wider range of wines available from different countries that I was used to at home.

Jul 11, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Yes. To clarify my point, the traditional wine growing nations I listed are Italy and France (there are others). Non traditional wine growing nations I listed are Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and the US. Yes the US producing some fine wines but like in Britain, and Ireland etc Americans generally aren't raised up drinking wine from early on, it's not broadly part of everyday culture like in France or Italy. Wine is a hobby or an interest for many wine drinkers outside the traditional wine growing nations. This leads to searching and discovering of wines; similar to how some can treat craft beer.

Jul 11, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer

Beer myths, part 1

Correction: I said in Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia AND the USA people search for new wines.

Jul 11, 2014
Chinon00 in Beer