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Coconut Frosting Recipe

Entirely possible that she did. We had different points of view on cooking/baking techniques. However, my hope was to find something similar enough that it could pass without having to resort to using cool whip.

Oct 16, 2013
Delairen in Home Cooking

Coconut Frosting Recipe

Unfortunately the King Arthur one won't work. I have a lot of faith in King Arthur's recipes, they're almost always fabulous, but in this particular case, I need the coconut to be mixed in to the frosting, not garnish. If I was starting from scratch with 'Make Coconut Cake', I'd totally go for it, but I'm trying to recreate a family recipe, and it had the coconut mixed in to the frosting.

Oct 15, 2013
Delairen in Home Cooking

Coconut Frosting Recipe

So, a friend of mine lost her mother a couple of years ago, and as part of a day of the dead celebration this year, she asked me if I would make a coconut cake for her, like her mother used to make. The cake I'm not too worried about, it was simply a white cake. But the frosting is giving me a real headache. Because her mom passed, we can't really ask her, but I guess the frosting was mixed together the night before and allowed to refrigerate? The only recipes that I can find that are similar to that A) Call for Cool Whip, which I simply can not, can not, see myself ever using or buying and B) are kind of vague on the ingredient types (Coconut? What kind of coconut? Sweetened flakes? Frozen? Unsweetened? BLERGH!)

So I was wondering if any of you good chowhound folks had a good, tried and true, overnight Coconut Frosting recipe that does not use cool whip that you could share with me?

Thanks!

Oct 14, 2013
Delairen in Home Cooking

Strawberry Bundt (or Pound) Cake Recipe?

Hey all -

I'm looking for a fantastic, tried and true, strawberry bundt (or pound) cake recipe. I've been looking and looking, but most of the recipes I've seen are either A) Plain cakes *topped* with strawberries, B) Plain Cake with chunks of strawberries in it, or C) Box Mix cakes that use Jello and other ingredients to provide the flavor.

I'm hoping to find a recipe for a moist, finger friendly snack type cake with a natural pink color. Anyone got one? :-)

Del

May 03, 2012
Delairen in Home Cooking

Dulce de Leche from Whole Milk (And other ideas for excess milk?)

Thanks for the help, everyone - and the side discussion about cheese was interesting. :-) I'll try some of the cheeses suggested the next time I have excess milk. I ended up making the dulce de leche on the stovetop (and it came out epic); figuring it was better to try making it the sort of official way to get a feel for it before trying to tinker. If I decide to try playing with different methods later I'll post an update. :-)

Del

Sep 15, 2011
Delairen in Home Cooking

Dulce de Leche from Whole Milk (And other ideas for excess milk?)

Hey Chowhounders -

I have an excess amount of milk at the moment, and was thinking about making some Dulce de Leche from scratch, but I had some questions, and I was hoping some of you might have some ideas, because unfortunately the majority of web articles on the subject have to do with the kind made from boiling a can of sweetened condensed milk (and I just got plumb tired of wading through them! >.<)

So the basic process seems simple enough. Heat milk & sugar together, simmer, add baking soda, stir constantly and cook until reduced. Which takes hours from what I understand.

My first question is; has anyone tried doing this in a Sous Vide, Crockpot, Bain Marie or even in the oven? It seems to me that a steady, consistent temperature that any of those options would provide would be much preferable to the vagaries of the stove top.

My Second question is; If you do use one of the above methods, is it required to stir constantly, or does the gentler heating method protect and insulate it enough that it wouldn't be as necessary. In other words, does the stirring serve another purpose, such as preventing clumping from forming, as opposed to merely being to prevent scorching.

My third question is, is it possible to Can Dulce de Leche in a shelf-stable format? I have both a pressure canner and a waterbath canner - and I know Dairy is a big no-no in both, but I'm wondering if Dulce De Leche is still a danger if it's been reduced down so far, since both the acidity level of it and the sugar levels would be pretty high.

Also, if anyone has any other ideas for things to make with excess milk, I'd love to hear them.

Thanks!
Del

Sep 14, 2011
Delairen in Home Cooking

Must-Eat San Diego?

Thanks Josh!

Hit up the Linkery last night for dinner and found it to be amazingly good. Really appreciate the rec. I'm definitely making plans to hit the Hillcrest Farmers Market on Sunday, and then will probably try out one of the other restaurants you mentioned. :-)

While I was at the Linkery, I grabbed some of their cured meats to take back to the Bay area with me, NOM!

Are there any other food, dining or cooking places I should hit up for souvenirs (edible or otherwise)?

Thanks again for all your help!
Del

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Linkery
3794 30th St, San Diego, CA 92104

Jul 30, 2010
Delairen in San Diego

Must-Eat San Diego?

Hey Chowhounders -

Decided at the last moment to come down to San Diego for this weekend, and wanted to find & check out some of the best that San Diego has to offer.

Anyone have any recommendations for fantastic restaurants with a focus on local, organic, seasonal & sustainable produce that they want to point me towards?

Bonus question: Best farmers market to check out?

Thanks Chowhounders!
Del

Jul 29, 2010
Delairen in San Diego

Canning in an oil bath instead of a pressure cooker?

Thank you, Monocle. That is an excellent point. Darn, guess I'll have to save up and get that pressure cooker after all. <sigh> :-)

Del

Jul 19, 2010
Delairen in Home Cooking

Canning in an oil bath instead of a pressure cooker?

I'd hardly call 240 degrees super-heated oil - most deep frying takes place at much higher temperatures. If you were concerned about the jars exploding due to temperature changes, you could submerge in oil first and then bring up to temperature - the same as you would do when canning with European style canning jars.

I'm hearing a lot of hand wringing and haranguing about how it's just not done that way, but not anyone actually thinking about the science of it.

Pressure canner makes food safe because it heats it to 240 degrees which kills botulism.

Water bath canners cannot 212 degrees without pressure.

Ergo, canning in oil - which can reach and hold a steady temperature of 240 degrees, seems like a possibility.

Is it one I'm going to try? No - but not because I don't think it could work somehow.

For one, oil would be more expensive than water, you'd need an awful lot of it, and you couldn't really save it and reuse it more than a few times because you'd be risking contamination from rancid oil.

And then the sealing issue, as I already mentioned about oil getting between the rubber seal and the jar.

It would also be more persnickety. You'd have to sit there and monitor a temperature gauge.

As for timing... 240 degrees is 240 degrees, if your recipe says to process under pressure for 20 minutes, then I would assume processing at 240 degrees in oil would be about the same.

There might be very good reasons why it wouldn't work - I just haven't really heard any yet.

Delairen

Jul 19, 2010
Delairen in Home Cooking

Canning in an oil bath instead of a pressure cooker?

My husband and I were just talking about this earlier this evening, when we decided to see if anyone else had ever tried it, lol. I, too, have recently gotten in to canning, but am hesitant to buy another gadget to store. My geek-hubby came up with the idea of oil, too - and we were trying to figure out if it would work.

After giving it some thought, I think I wouldn't try it - mostly because I'm afraid that when submerging the jars, while the air is being expelled but before there is a good seal, some oil would get in between the rubber seal and the glass - causing an improper seal. Smarter heads than mine might be able to come up with a solution to that.

If you decide to try it though, I'd do it as a limited run, and store for a few months to see how the seal holds up before trying again. Also if you try it - please post and let us know if it works. :-)

Regards,
Del

Jul 19, 2010
Delairen in Home Cooking

Buying a Quarter (or Side) of Grass Fed Beef (and other local meats)

I'm about to take the plunge and purchase my first (probably) quarter or (maybe) side of beef, and I was looking for recommendations from people who've done this sort of thing before. Anyone have any personal experiences they would like to relate?

Things I'd like to know:

Where did you buy?
What (amount) did you get?
How was the quality?
Would you do it again?

If you have experiences with Goat, Lamb or Pig, I'd also be interested in that. We just bought a big ol' chest freezer, and Mama's looking to fill 'er up.

Thanks!

Apr 02, 2010
Delairen in San Francisco Bay Area

Identify the mystery bean?

At the farmer's market recently, I picked up some fresh beans in-pods. The lady didn't know what they were called, but said they were similar to Blackeyed Peas - can anyone identify these mystery beans for me?

Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
Del

Sep 12, 2009
Delairen in General Topics