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Mutton! (aka Old Sheep Meat)

Yes thanks for the suggestions everyone, but Detroit is far, far away from where I'm at.

Sep 28, 2011
IrisLaRue in Great Lakes

Mutton! (aka Old Sheep Meat)

Hey everyone who lives in the Michiana area! I need some help.

I am one of those really weird people who looooves the funky, musky taste of mutton. That is, fatty old sheep meat. It's not popular in the US but I have very fond memories of my grandmother roasting mutton and serving it with mint jelly. I was living with her in East Lansing, MI at this time in my childhood and I seem to remember her getting it from the butcher that worked at Meijer. Whether it was special order or she had the secret hookup for mutton, I don't know.

However, it certainly is not in any Meijer stores in South Bend or Michigan City! Or at any butcher shops or other grocery stores...I've tried Indian markets, Latin grocers, and even called a Lebanese butcher but no luck! Argh! Anyone have any sources for this? I will be posting this on the Chicago area board too. Thanks for your help!

Sep 26, 2011
IrisLaRue in Great Lakes

I've Acquired A Real Gyros Broiler...

Boneless leg of lamb is an excellent idea! I actually prefer the strong taste of mutton but you can never find it in the States :-/

RGC1982 you're absolutely right, I have NO desire to replicate the "fake meat" texture of bad commercial Gyros. I think the lamb leg will be perfect for this, just the right size.

acgold7, my bf has waxed poetic about the Greek traditional Easter whole lamb roasted on a spit. He is bound and determined to make one in our fire pit in the back yard this coming Easter. He says the eyeballs are his favorite part but also likes the kidneys (ok, Andrew Zimmern Jr...)

Thanks everyone for your great suggestions!

Sep 02, 2011
IrisLaRue in Cookware

I've Acquired A Real Gyros Broiler...

Ok, I wasn't planning on using this inside my house, ever. That would probably result in a gigantic mess. My plans were for outdoor cooking. Yes, it's electric but I'm not sure what voltage it is.

My boyfriend's father passed away years ago and he never learned how to work the broiler or make the meat for gyros as they closed the restaurant quite a while ago. One uncle still lives in Chicago but they don't talk very often, and I think he's probably not up for a gyros making lesson any time soon.

The turkey idea is interesting! When my bf traveled in Germany he says they served gyros with sauerkraut, but no mention of turkey meat.

I hadn't thought of whole chickens, that's a good idea. I bet it's just big enough to hold two large chickens on the spit. Like I said, it's really nowhere near as large as a regular commercial model.

Sep 01, 2011
IrisLaRue in Cookware

I've Acquired A Real Gyros Broiler...

The vertical kind you see in Middle Eastern and Greek restaurants, that has a rotating spit. It looks like it's from about the late 70s. It's a smaller one, not exactly a "full-size" commercial one. My boyfriend's father and uncles ran a restaurant in Greektown Chicago and this is the one they used. I couldn't let it go into the trash!

However I have absolutely no idea how to use it, or how to make the actual meat to go on it. I've done quite a bit of research on this and it seems some people make a finely ground meat mixture to pack onto the spit (how the heck does it stick and not fall off?) and some wind strips of meat around it (sounds really difficult). Also the instructions people give on preparing everything, cooking and slicing are sometimes a bit hard to understand.

Can anyone give me straightforward, concise instructions on how to make gyros on this broiler? I'd like to keep it as authentic as possible, whether the info you have is for Greek style gyros or for shwarma.

Aug 31, 2011
IrisLaRue in Cookware

Worms in my cod

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jo...

An excellent excerpt showing that parasitic cysts can survive temperatures as high as 212 degrees F in fish. The recommended internal temperature for fish steaks is 125-140 degrees F. While Heterophyes are flukes and not worms, many common parasitic worms have similar survival mechanisms.

Some cysts containing larvae can survive completely inactive and benign inside a host for a number of years, embedded in muscle tissue, with no obvious symptoms. They can then come out of their inactive state and begin to reproduce.

In general, parasitic worms are found mainly in the muscle tissue of the host, since the eggs travel through the bloodstream and embed in the muscles. The upper digestive tract is too active and chemically hazardous to support larvae.

Jan 22, 2009
IrisLaRue in General Topics

Worms in my cod

To me, having done some food sanitation study and working in a medical setting, worms in food = parasitic infestation. I would be seriously paranoid that a piece of fish containing visible live worms would also contain their larvae, eggs and cysts in higher than normal numbers. While thorough cooking would kill the live adult worms, the cysts could still survive high temperatures and infect your digestive tract or bloodstream.

Jan 21, 2009
IrisLaRue in General Topics

Making Cheetos At Home

This was sorta kinda touched upon briefly in 2006 with this thread: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/339798 but it wasn't very satisfying.

For me, Crunchy Cheetos have always been one of those weird snacks that I adore but cannot really recognize as "actual food" because I have no idea how they are made. I know from reading the package that they are made of corn meal and vegetable oil, with powdered cheese and sour cream as the main flavorings. From Wikipedia, I now know that they are a "heated dough that is extruded and then fried or baked". So, is it like a strange cousin of pate au choux? Is it really a dough made of nothing but corn meal, vegetable oil and salt, piped into hot oil? Could it really be so simple? I will experiment with any suggestions posted and then relay the results.

Jan 21, 2009
IrisLaRue in Home Cooking