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Help Choosing New Staub Dutch Oven

I wound up getting the 9 qt. - has more capacity than our current 7 qt. (which she could choose to keep or get rid of if she felt it to be redundant), and its diameter is very close to the long axis of a 7qt. oval, but without the uneven heating.

She loves it. We broke it in with a chicken and dumplings recipe that took up over half the space in the 7 qt, but we feel we can double it in the 9. She's giving the 7 to one of our friends and now wants a 5.5 qt. to compliment. Curious to see how well the smooth enamel bottom handles being moved around on a stove.

Feb 20, 2014
wintermute2.0 in Cookware

Help Choosing New Staub Dutch Oven

I'm liking the idea of the 9 qt. Yes, it's more $ but the diameter is just a teeny bit shorter than the long axis on a 7 qt. oval, it's not redundant with our current 7 qt. round, and we can fit more sauce or soup in the thing. Thanks.

Jan 29, 2014
wintermute2.0 in Cookware

Help Choosing New Staub Dutch Oven

Hi,

I'm shopping around for a Staub DO for one of my wife's 40th birthday presents. She's a very knowledgable cook and we already own a no-name 7 qt. round enameled dutch oven as well as seasoned Lodge DO and Camp Oven. I know she's wanted a LC or a Staub for a long time, but she's been hinting pretty strongly about it recently.

We've primarily used the DO for ragu, chicken and dumplings, gumbo, coq au vin, short ribs (the usual) and stuck with our Crock Pot for slow cooking longer cuts of meat.

So, I know this is a primarily a personal decision and none of you know my wife, but here's what I'm thinking as far as size shapes:

- Just get a 7 qt. round and let her deep-six the cheapie (perfectly functional, a little banged up) - it's probably the most functional size and will be used the most.

- Get a 7 qt. or 8.5 qt. oval (not sure which) - she can still use the 7 qt. round, and this will allow us to cook the larger meat cuts. I'm not sure how academic the whole uneven heating on gas stove thing is. Braising meat has been a secondary use to date, but size may have been a factor.

- The curve ball: I noticed there's a steamer insert for the 5.5 qt. round. Less functional than the 7? Yes. But when the neighbor drops off a bushel of blue crabs (I think they'll fit) off during the summer, good times will be had. Anyone use a DO in this capacity?

Jan 28, 2014
wintermute2.0 in Cookware

Quick Help! Pubs/Gastropubs in East Village

Just found out we're meeting friends for dinners and drinks this evening, and the locale was just changed on me. Any suggestions for good pub eats in the E Village? Thanks!

Nov 27, 2010
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Suggestions on Surviving the Olive Garden? (moved from Manhattan Board)

I agree with the other posts. Soup/salad/breadsticks are the way to go. If you're looking for an entree, stick with traditional spaghetti joint picks (chicken parm or their "capellini pomodoro") and you'll be okay, as long as you don't expect too much.

Dec 16, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Chains

Good Winter Food and Patisseries/bakeries Upper East Side?

Thanks. Anything a little further south? Say the 50's-70's?

Dec 16, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good Winter Food and Patisseries/bakeries Upper East Side?

I'm taking the family to Manhattan this weekend to do our usual Xmas spiel: the tree, letting the kids rock climb in Central Park, etc. Looking for a nice cozy place to get good stick to your ribs food for not-so-much money (think pub or southern/soul food) and a patisserie or bakery to get the kids wound up on a fancy sugar high.

Dec 14, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Smokin' Al's - Massapequa

My wife and I went here the other weekend with a couple of friends and were quite impressed. Although the place was packed to the gills, we pretty easily maneuvered into a spot at the bar. Although there was a 1.5 hour wait, it was well worth it. Although the decor is sparse, it really is a beautiful space, with exposed brick walls, wide pine floors, and exposed wood ceiling. Plus, we got to bask in that glorious smoke smell the whole time, and as a bonus for those bourbon drinkers out there, they have Blanton's, and have heavy hands when pouring. Plus we got to watch as dish after huge dish passed by us at the wait station (Note: must try the nachos - giant - next time). Make sure you have someone seated facing the hostess station, since seating numbers are non-sequential, and you may not hear them call your number over the crowd - you have to rely on the placards they hold up.

We started off with an app of burnt endz - the ends of beef briskets that they scorch after smoking. Incredible! Cruncy outside and nice and tender inside. For dinner I ordered the baby back rib/smoked sausage combo with baked beans and cole slaw for sides. In true barbeque fashion, you can have your ribs wet or dry. Of course I chose dry. The ribs were very tasty with an excellent dry rub. Nice and singed outside, but very tender with an excellent smoked flavor. I tried a bit of Al's rattlesnake sauce with them - it added a nice amount of heat to the ribs and some sweetness. I wasn't sure what to expect with the sausages, and was surprised to taste that they were Italian sausages that were thrown in the smoker. A new but delectable taste for me. The beans and slaw were both homemade and excellent. No mayo to be found on that slaw and there was plenty of brown sugar and molasses in the beans.

My wife had The Melt sandwich. You get to choose what type of meat to put in the sandwich and she wisely chose the pulled pork. The best I can describe the pork is it has that texture that makes you just want to chew it with your molars and bask in that taste, if it makes any sense. The sandwich (the size of a LARGE Italian roll) was covered with onion straws and cheddar cheese.

The best taste of the night though was the double order of sweet potato fries that my friend got, covered in brown sugar goodness. A side dish and dessert rolled up into one.

Go there, go hungry, because you'll be bringing home plenty for leftovers.

Buffalo Fries

Never had them down here, but had them all the time when I lived up in Buffalo, where they were refered to as Buffalo Chips, were served strictly on waffle fries, and many places substituted the blue cheese with cheddar sauce and jalepeno slices. Good luck on your search!

Feb 02, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good Dessert Places in Village?

Thanks! Sweet Revenge sounds awesome I like the cupcake/wine/beer pairings!

Feb 02, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Buffalo Wings--Nassau County

Croxley Ales has some of the best wings I've had outside of B'flo (lived there 4 years). They're great at both the Franklin Square and Rockville Centre locations, and although I haven't had them yet at the new Farmingdale location, the food that I've tried there has been on par with the other Croxleys.

The other place I like 'em at is the Back Page Ale House in Massapequa.

Good Dessert Places in Village?

I guess we'll be in NoHo, technically, so anything's fine as long as it's not in Alphabet City or too west.

Jan 30, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good Dessert Places in Village?

Looking for good dessert places in the Village open past 10PM for a post show treat. Leaning toward French. Thanks.

Jan 30, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Long Island Halfway Point Needed

Try looking in Melville and Farmingdale along the Route 110 corridor. Plenty of spots around there, although I mainly frequent the Black Forest Brew Haus on the corner of New Highway and Smith Street in Melville (one block east of Rte 110). Large menu - there's a lot of interesting takes on German food, but the menu is large and ecclectic enough to make most people happy. Personal favorites include the Brew Ben (a Reuben sandwich on great soft pretzel rolls), the flame cakes - supposedly a German take on pizza - thin crispy crust, marscapone cheese, onions, diced tomatoes, bacon (although it wrecks havoc with my lactose intolerance). Wings are pretty awesome. AND they make their own beer.

If you're into that sort of thing.

Great Takeout near Bethpage, LI

Wow, that's odd about the Orient. They've been nothing but extremely gracious every time I go in there.

Cafe for Breakfast in Nassau?

I live in Seaford and it seems like there's really not much to go to in the area if I want to sit down and have a nice pastry and some good coffee for breakfast. Anyone know of any place?

Even Gordon Ramsey cannot save the Mixing Bowl in Wantagh

It didn't help that they have the Sage Bistro and Orzon Thai powerhouses across the street.

Brewpubs in Manhattan?

Like I said, I can only speak for the LI locations, but at these spots they have the best wings outside of Buffalo (and I've had plenty at the Anchor Bar, Duff's and the Buffalo Brew Pub), divine fish and chips (best thing on the menu), a really good take on chicken pot pie (served in a bread bowl). The only thing I was ever disappointed in was their steak and mushroom pie/stew. But like I said, I don't know what the Manhattan kitchen is like.

Jan 21, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Great Takeout near Bethpage, LI

The Orient on Route 107 in Bethpage has some of the best chinese takeout going (Great Dim Sum and other interesting dishes if you dine in). No frills looks inside, but one of the great chinese restaurants on Long Island.

Good French Bistro Downtown

Will do. I won't be going for a while though - early March. It's my wife's birthday, and I have the typical Teutonic flaw of having to overplan everything.

Jan 20, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Brewpubs in Manhattan?

If the NYC iteration of Croxley Ales is anything like the Long Island ones, it should have a great beer selection and amazing pub food. The Long Island branches have the best fish and chips I've ever tasted bar none.

Jan 20, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Are there any authentic French patisseries in the city?

Sorry to hijack thread, but is there anything in midtown east?

Jan 20, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good eats on Long Island?

Kazu is a WONDERFUL sushi place in Nesconsett in the Nesconsett Plaza. Only a few tables which makes it extra special. The owner (Kazu) is a sport fisherman and will bring his catch in as the daily special (although it won't really concern you in winter). If you're looking to spend some money and eat some steak, Teller's, next to the Islip Town Hall can hold it's own with any of the big names. The 20's bank building that it's in is really cool.

Jan 20, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good French Bistro Downtown

From what I've been reading on this board, sounds like Le Gigot is the spot. I was just giving cassoulet as an example of the type of bistro food we enjoy - the basics. No fusion, nothing fancy. Seems like Le Gigot is nice, tiny and romantic, with excellent food, which is what I'm going for, but please feel free to offer more suggestions. Thank you.

Jan 20, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan

Good French Bistro Downtown

Since this is my first post, let me first say "Hi".

I know this is like shooting fish in a barrel, but what's everyone's recommendation for a great French Bistro in the Village/SoHo area? I'm taking my wife into the city for a nice night out from the kids, going to see La Boheme at the Amato, and wanted to take her somewhere special in that area for a preshow dinner. We're both pretty traditionalist as far as fare (steak frites, cassoulet, etc.) and decor. If I can keep it under $100, even better. Thanks!

Jan 19, 2009
wintermute2.0 in Manhattan