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Two thumbs up for Jim Lahey's "My Bread"!

I tried the carrot bread. I liked it, but much prefer it without the cumin seeds. It makes a nice breakfast toast, spread with cream cheese.

I also just made the peanut butter and jelly bread and think there must be a typo in the recipe. it's a small loaf, baked an 8" pan, but he calls for baking it at 450F for an hour and fifteen minutes. Even with the foil tent on top, this bread is came out overcooked. I wonder if the temperature was supposed to be 350F.

The cheese bread is pretty amazing.

Jan 09, 2010
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Soi Polo style Thai Fried Chicken

I can't imagine that it wouldn't be very delicious. The main difference seems to be when the rice flour gets added--does one mix it in with the marinade so that it becomes a sort of slurry, or does one dust the chicken with it after it's already marinated?

From the photo at the top of her post, it looks like the skin is beginning to detach a little. It's hardly a flaw, but I noticed that when I made it with the slurry-like recipe from the Atlantic website, the batter seems to really fuse the skin to the meat, forming a very strong, crispy seal. It's the sort of chicken you could toss into a bucket and lug off to a picnic and not have any of the skin fall off at all.

Aug 05, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Soi Polo style Thai Fried Chicken

forgot to add photo

Aug 05, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Soi Polo style Thai Fried Chicken

Someone on the LA board a few years ago was looking for a recipe for Thai fried chicken in the style of the food stall near the polo club in Bangkok.

This recipe posted on The Atlantic website doesn't include the piles of crispy fried garlic, but the chicken itself is pretty darn close:

http://food.theatlantic.com/abroad/be...

I had never made fried chicken with rice flour before, and I was amazed at not only how crisp it turned out, but how sturdy it is--it doesn't easily detach while frying like buttermilk/flour batter sometimes can. The coating also seems to seal in the heat and juices. 25 minutes after it came out of the oil, it was still piping hot and juicy inside. Even the breast meat.

Aug 05, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

peanut butter cookie recipes using natural?

These flourless cookies (made with just pb, sugar, an egg, and some baking soda) are amazing. They are intensely peanutty, and you'd never guess that they had no flour. Every flour-based pb cookie I've had since just tastes like a peanut butter 'flavored' cookie. Oh, and they turned out beautifully when I made them with natural peanut butter, which was the whole point of this thread. :)

http://www.joythebaker.com/blog/2009/...

Jun 12, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

How do you make old-fashioned popcorn in a covered pan or pot?

I have a tiny kitchen, so I doubt I'd ever get the WHIRLEY-POP since it seems to be good for only one thing (maybe one can boil pasta in it?).

Fresh lard (not the blocks from the supermarket) makes a tasty popping medium.

May 26, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Cherry Blossom preserve?

You might look into some of the various techniques for making rosewater (some involve making a 'still', other involve an infusion in alcohol, etc.) I guess it doesn't really preserve the blossoms themselves as much as their essence.

Apr 15, 2009
F Schubert in Home Cooking

looking for Calvados in Taipei

Anybody know a liquor store in Taipei likely to have Calvados?

Ummm... Does EVERYTHING stick to SS?

Regarding potatoes, besides using higher heat, you'll be able to get them to release more easily if you leave them alone until they form a nice strong crust, and then gently pry them off with a thin metal spatula. If you try to move them around before a nice thick crust is formed, then the crust will be more likely to stick. Same thing with skin-on chicken pieces.

Feb 23, 2008
F Schubert in Cookware

Fresh Masa

So sad. Have there been any good guesses/theories as to why this is so? Seems like its not for a lack of relevant immigrant populations. This is kinda like going down to Chinatown and only being able to find Uncle Ben's rice.

Jan 24, 2008
F Schubert in Manhattan

long fresh pork shanks...what to do?

the words "Mexican", "braised" and "pork" are enough to get me excited--can you describe it a little?

Jan 19, 2008
F Schubert in Home Cooking

long fresh pork shanks...what to do?

I ordered a couple of pig's feet from a nearby farm which has excellent organic, heritage breed pork, but got much more than I bargained for when I picked up my order at the farmer's market: Two feet, still attached to very long sections of shank. Each one is comparable in length and girth to my own forearm, from my elbow to my fingertips.

I'm using one of the feet this weekend for stew--lacking a hacksaw, it was surprisingly difficult to remove the foot!

Any ideas for what to do with the two remaining shanks? It's great pork (and cheap--$10), just a little awkwardly shaped--they are too long to fit into any pot I own. My first thought is to braise them in a covered roasting pan, and then somehow crisp them up at the end.

Or just treat them like a thinner, bonier version of a Cuban/Puerto Rican roast pork shoulder, rubbing with garlic etc. and roasting until falling apart and crispy.

I'd be grateful to hear other suggestions, or especially some traditional recipes (if any exist) that address this odd cut. Maybe I'd even go to the hardware store and get a saw if it seems worthwhile.

Thanks!

Jan 19, 2008
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Arepa lady's recipe?

Is this it? I wouldn't be surprised if the A.L. uses margarine instead of butter.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

Jan 18, 2008
F Schubert in Home Cooking

The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen: Vegetables

I love this dish--maybe my favorite and most frequently cooked one in the whole book. Orange zest sounds like a great idea. I usually use twice as much chard leaves as she calls for because they cook down so much anyway, and who wants to have a few lonely leaves of leftover shard in the fridge? Same thing with the tomatoes or the fennel--an overabundance of either does no harm to the finished dish. I usually have it over brown rice as a weeknight dinner. I'm making it as I type this!

Jan 16, 2008
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Fried brown rice

I love fried white rice (especially kimchi rice) and make it often, but I'm trying to get more brown rice (which I also love) into my diet.

I haven't ever tried using brown rice for fried rice. Wondering if anyone has technique tips, or rice variety recommendations.

Jan 10, 2008
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Stock: do's & don'ts

I'd skip the carrot and onion peels in favor of actual carrots and onions. Onion skins are often moldy, and I've never noticed their having any particular flavor. And carrot skins contain a lot of embedded dirt that even a good scrubbing can't remove (or if you scrub them well enough, then you've basically peeled them). And if you're not buying organic, who knows what's been sprayed on your vegetables.

I often make batches of what I think of as neutral stock, adding only onion to whatever meat/bones I'm using. This allows me to take it in different directions at a later point, adding herbs, garlic, ginger, other vegetables, etc., rather than committing myself to making a big pot of really specifically flavored stock.

Dec 10, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

'natural' cream cheese in pastry dough

I'm considering using some kind of natural cream cheese in the pastry of a favorite rugalach recipe.

Will my recipe (which has turned out well in the past when I've used Philadelphia) fail without the contributions of stabilizers, gums, preservatives, antibiotics, hormones, plutonium, etc? I live near a good cheese shop that has a variety of natural cream cheeses--maybe I should just try to pick one that's nearest in texture to Philly. I'd be grateful for any tips.

Dec 10, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

any use for onions from Hazan's tomato sauce?

Onion hugger!

Dec 04, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Baked beans quest

John Thorne has a beautiful essay on baked beans in his book "Serious Pig", with several recipes, including the maple syrup/bacon variant, making your own salt pork, as well as the traditional accompaniments, brown bread and cole slaw.

Dec 03, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

any use for onions from Hazan's tomato sauce?

I'm not proud to admit that I usually toss the tomatoey onion when I make this sauce.

Maybe puree it and spread it on bruschetta with some fresh herb garnish? Or fold the puree into scrambled eggs and put it on toast for breakfast? Or in a frittata? Or mixed with some warm cooked black eye peas and tossed over rice with some tabasco sauce parsley?

Next time I'll hold onto the onion.

Dec 03, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

harder and harder to find good fresh garlic (and shallots)

Thanks, Ruth. I knew you'd shed some light. Hope to make it out to your neck of the woods again someday.

Nov 28, 2007
F Schubert in General Topics

harder and harder to find good fresh garlic (and shallots)

Nice to know I'm not alone in my garlic frustrations. The decline is still mysterious to me. I would have expected that industrialization might have led garlic and shallots to become sturdier but less tasty (like so much other produce), rather than merely less sturdy. The other day when I gave a head of garlic a squeeze at the supermarket, my thumb sank right into it. Yuck.

(Upper West Side tangent: I have to say that Whole Foods garlic and shallots are reliably good, at least in the Columbus Circle location. Fairway is often bad, unless you buy the occasionally available expensive specialty breed. Bodega garlic is almost always unusable.)

Nov 27, 2007
F Schubert in General Topics

No Knead Bread - 1 Year Later

I've gently pressed the dough into an oiled deep dish pizza pan and made sort of a thick pizza/focaccia with it.

Nov 26, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Thanksgiving BREAKFAST

That sounds amazing. I hope it turned out well.

I'm curious how you do your eggs. I used to be a runny-yolk guy, but my new wife likes her yolks more solid, so I've been experimenting with different timings, covering the pan, etc. in order to achieve an ever-so-slightly molten (but not runny!) yolk. When I get it just right, I even prefer it to runny. Hard, crumbly yolks are a bummer--might as well have boiled them.

Nov 25, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

harder and harder to find good fresh garlic (and shallots)

Anyone else notice that garlic and shallots in the supermarket are getting nastier every year? At least here in NYC, I have a difficult time finding heads of garlic that aren't moldy, rotten, blemishes, sprouting, etc. Shallots are even worse.

I can still usually find decent garlic at the farmer's market, but I remember when I started cooking about dozen years ago, you could count on getting unblemished garlic at the supermarket. What's going on?

(The pre-peeled garlic in the plastic tubs usually looks fine, but I don't like the idea of using all that plastic just to save a few seconds of work.)

Nov 24, 2007
F Schubert in General Topics

What were they cleaning? Please help identify this fruit or nut! [Moved from Manhattan board]

Ah, the tree that smells like freshly walked dog. Here's another NY Times bit about the nuts and the Asians who love them:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage...

Nov 06, 2007
F Schubert in General Topics

Matsutake Tokusen - best way to prepare?

Eating matsutakes will also help keep you regular.

Sep 23, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Durian pudding w/fresh durian at "Whatever"

http://www.deliciousorganics.com/reci...

Above is a link to a page about tropical fruits, including tips on how to tackle a jackfruit. It can be a messy affair.

May 05, 2007
F Schubert in Manhattan

what to serve with shrimp pad thai?

It's hard to find a really obvious compliment b/c pad thai already has it all: starch, protein and veggies, as well as just about every texture and flavor one can think of. In Thailand, it's often served with a small plate of sliced banana blossoms, which looks and tastes a little like endive, but is much more astringent. It tastes great with pad thai in much the same way that a hoppy beer does--resetting your palate and making you want another bite.

Lacking banana blossoms, papaya salad would of course be nice, as would anything else similarly fresh and crisp like jicama, julienned granny smith apples, a green salad with lots of citrus flavors (grapefruit?), etc.

Some type of spicy/sour/clear broth would also be nice to sip with pad thai. Simmer some hot peppers in chicken stock till the stock is spicy. Strain out the peppers, add lots of lime juice and a handful of minced thai herbs (some combo of mint, cilatro, basil).

Jan 27, 2007
F Schubert in Home Cooking

Do any foods taste good after you brush your teeth?

Elgydium toothpaste is one of a few brands out there that doesn't clash disgustingly with food.

Jan 27, 2007
F Schubert in Not About Food