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Easy Crab Cakes

Two cups of breading? I prefer America's Test Kitchen recipe that has no breading at all. And I do like the lemon zest. But squeezing the crab? Do you use that canned stuff from China?

Jul 07, 2013
cosmkdbree in Recipes

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Evidently there are stronger opinions on cooking ribs then there are on POTUS.

My take is this. Ribs for 90 minutes? That's grilling, not BBQ. I cook mine a minimum of 5 hours. 9 is best. You have to gauge your heat at less than 200 degrees and more than 160.

If they are parboiled, you might be able to get away with an hour or two on the grill, but the meat would still be tough.

Brining, or parboiling, will add moisture and allow longer cooking times. This will allow the fat to break down, making them more tender, and give a longer smoke time, and a longer time for the marinade/rub flavor to cook into the ribs. (Longer of course, for spare ribs. Less for baby backs, which are better for things like tailgates or when you don't want to spend all night shoveling wood chunks into the smoker.)

But if you are happy with what you are doing, don't make radical changes. I think many of us agree that Costco ribs are prime.

I do agree with misterchi, that hickory is my wood of choice. But I prefer brining over a low heat, not to long or you will get too much salt flavor, rather than parboiling. Then low and slow in a smoker. The longer the better to a point. If you put them on early in the morning, they will be perfect for dinner, or late night for lunch the next day. Look for the meat pulling away from the end of the bone.

Of course, you can do this at a higher heat, but you will lose flavor and get a char, which adds nothing to the flavor and even is a carcinogen. Brining and/or parboiling will cut down on the char and still allow a longer cook time (at a low heat).

Feb 06, 2012
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Ribs for 90 minutes? I cook mine a minimum of 5. Are you grilling, or smoking? If they are parboiled, you might be able to get away with an hour or two.

Brining, or parboiling, will add moisture and allow longer cooking times. This will allow the fat to break down, making them more tender, and give a longer smoke time, and a longer time for the marinade/rub flavor to cook into the ribs.

But if you are happy with what you are doing, don't make radical changes. I think many of us agree that Costco ribs are prime.

Feb 06, 2012
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Brining has nothing to do with fat. It infuses moisture and salt into the meat, which makes it more moist, which makes it take longer to smoke.......and we all know that smoking wrings moisture out of the meat, which is why many of us smoke over a bowl of water/beer/vinegar.......pick your poison......they all add moisture to the cooking environment. So does brining. It's science.

Jul 25, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

But we all agree on brining, right?

Jul 25, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

No, as previously stated, I do not boil. But I will simmer the bine mixture over a very low heat. You can brine it in a cold mixture, of course, but it takes longer and I usually don't have room in my refrigerator. I get virtually the same results by simmering for about an hour......very low heat though.

Jul 21, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

It's not only the tenderness, but it (brining) also adds moisture and flavor to the meat. Moisture is especially important because, by it's very nature, BBQ is a method of drying out meats. (In fact that's where the name barbeque comes from as it was originally a form of cooking used in the Caribbean as a way for people without refrigeration to preserve meat by slowly removing the moisture......like a meat jerky for example.) All I can say at this point is I recommend that you try brining sometime. It takes a little longer but I find it benefits the meat. And hey, if you don't like it or find it takes too much work, you can always go back to your standard method. We all have our personal tastes, which is one reason you can find so many different flavors of barbeque sauce around the country. Gotta love me some barbeque!! :-)

Jul 21, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

It is the same as smoking. Are you talking about parboiling, or brining? Parboiling is partially cooling the meat. Brining is a science (literally), and prepares the meat to be cooked, much as adding a rub is preparing meat. Brining doesn't effect the fat/collagen at all, other than to infuse it with salt, and actually increases the weigh of the meat, which also increases the required cooking time. Here's a decent site that describes brining. http://bbq.about.com/cs/pork/a/aa0118...

Jul 20, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

lol.....I love this thread. BBQ is low and slow, by definition. I consider anything over 280 F as grilling. I have pretty good results doing both.

Again, I highly recommend brining pork and poultry. If you simmer over low heat (I prefer a mixture with beer, not soda) under 135 F, I still get a smoke ring (although not as pronounced). Any pork flavor that is lost is gained by the brining mixture. I've never had a complaint in that regard, in fact many compliments. Then 6-7 hours on the smoker (I prefer hickory and applewood), lightly rubbed, mopped in the last 2 hours, at about 180-185 F.........and you get fantastic, tender (but not gelatinous), flavorful ribs. That's my story. Eat well my friends.

Jul 20, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Cajun.....It is true that if parboiling is done wrong (too long), it can create a gelatinous effect. Then again, I've tasted some bad ribs BBQ'ed without parboiling, and some great ones that have been parboiled. If it is done right.....yum. Best ever. But like you, it has taken years to perfect my smoking technique too. Cajun, do you brine your pork?

Jul 17, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

@nihongojoe.......Apologies. I did not read you last paragraph before posting below. I can agree with that when the last paragraph is included, and reads much like my post above (way above). I try not boil, but do heat my ribs in a pot of water (and spices) over low heat.

Jul 17, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

You are missing the point. We are all talking about smoking our ribs on an indirect BBQ. The question at hand is brining and/or parboiling. You can't cook ribs by parboiling alone. It is the definition of the word. Parboiling is a term short for partial boiling. It creates a meat that is more tender and juicy and can, as mentioned above by others, increase the flavor with your parboil mix. Even if you do not parboil.....seriously, you should try it......I highly recommend that you brine your pork before you BBQ. Of course, since you have to brine for a minimum of 12 hours, you do not have time to do this in most competitions. But at home.......it's just the science of cooking. It tenderizes pork and poultry. I do not brine my beef.

Jul 17, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

The "true" method? That is the debate we are facing. Again, have you tried parboiling? Do you brine your pork? No mention of either. Your "true" method does not touch on the subject we are talking about, which is parboiling. I recommend you try it with a rack. Better yet, get two racks. Parboil one and BBQ the other. If you are doing them in the oven, which I do not recommend, I wouldn't use heat above 200 degrees. I shoot for 185 on my smoker.

Jul 17, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

This is partially correct. The longer and slower you cook the ribs, the better, to a point. There is a point where you begin to dry out the meat. Otherwise, I agree.

Indirect heat, of course. All BBQ is indirect heat, otherwise you are grilling. Outdoor.......kinda goes without saying.

Have you tried brining and parboiling? You can actually cook longer on the indirect heat and come up with more moist rib meat.

Jul 17, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

I think you missed the concept, Ms. Otps. I recommended brining them in warm water to gain flavor and tenderness. But I'm not against parboiling. Someone down south taught me to do it and it seems to work quite well. It adds tenderness and flavor, true about that. I prefer rotisserie chicken, or deep fried. You'd have to put a chuck roast on now.......might be good to use a crock pot. As for the 4 lb pork shoulder, if you are smoking that, I hope you had it on the smoker quite a few hours ago, but it is good to brine them also. Have a great time at your party. From Memphis to Raleigh, here's plenty of flavors out there, for sure.

Jul 16, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

As mentioned above, it can add tenderness and flavor. But it is probably against most, if not every, BBQ competitions' rules.

Jul 16, 2011
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Black Hog Barbeque in Frederick

Well, it's good, but not great. The best thing I had was the brisket, which was tender, flavorful and moist. The ribs were okay, but no better. The batch I had (wet) was on the dry side. The portions were also on the small side. Sauces were good and so were the sides. We had very good service. It's on par with Chubby's, up the road in Emmitsburg. Sure do miss the Mountaindale Store for brisket, and I do love Blues BBQ (the blue truck) on Grove Road. But Blues BBQ isn't open for dinner and it's not a real restaurant anyway. I hear they are openning something at McCutcheons when they expand. For ribs, try Urban in Rockville. They are great. But don't get any sides there, and don't expect any service there either.

Chubbies

Chubby's is good. Nothing bad to say about it. But there are other places in the area I like better. Chubby's has good size portions, some of the largest around. I like the sauces too. I usually stick with the pulled pork. For brisket, I sure miss the Mountaindale Store, but now that is gone I really like the brisket at the Black Hog in Frederick. It's great. I'll also rave about the ribs and pulled pork at Urban in Rockville (a few other locations now too), but I find the sides and service (there is none) lacking there.

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Mrs. Smith is good. But you don't need a coffee grinder.......a pepper grinder does fine. Especially if the "pepper grinder" has a coarse, medium and fine setting. As for Candy's comment........for gosh sakes brine your pork people. Duh. It is just science. See the link I posted above. I'm not saying that you have to boil anything. In fact, I don't. But brining your pork is best.

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Mrs. Smith....Stubb's is good. But the commercial version uses that fructose corn syrup. The ribs at his place in Austin are excellent though. I must say that. Perhaps a tad dry.....but excellent nonetheless.

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Gordeaux......Yuck. Please do not talk about "jello" ribs. Blech. We are talking about tender, flavorful ribs. I hate people that bring up that term "jello' ribs. I hope nobody here is cooking their ribs jello-like. If you bake them, or smoke them to long they can get dry. If you parboil them to long........yuck. But everyone should be brining their pork. Ham, bacon, ribs, shoulder.....whatever.....pork should be brined. As I posted, it is just simple science. The salt disolves some of the tougher proteins. It's that simple.

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

I really, really respect what Mrs. Smith is laying down. However, I might add that even those of you that are against parboiling and are baking or other should brine your pork before cooking it. It's just science, and it works.

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking

Parboiling Baby Back Ribs???

Shhhhh.....I know that the purests here will crucify me for even mentioning this, but it's true. Well, almost. At gal from Texas, smartest woman I ever dated, couldn't score less than 165 on an IQ test if she tried, and that's a fact, turned me on to this. First, everyone knows that you should be soaking your pork in brine before you cook it anyway. Duh. No brainer. (http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/...) So, after doing the parboil thing a few times, which makes great, tender ribs but loses a little on the flavor side, I think I've perfected the method. I parsimmer, in a brine solution. Soak your ribs, personally I prefer baby backs, but I understand that others enjoy spare, in a warm, salt-water solution. I go heavy on the salt, and soak them at about 180 degrees for 20 minutes or so. Then they are ready for any dry rub you like and on to the smoker. I use hickory, over water for a very low heat. After 7 hours or so.....yum. My friends swear by them and I've never had a complaint about lost flavor. Partly because I never boil the ribs, plus I like lots of smoke and I use a good sauce. (I prefer to make my own, but Cattleman's isn't bad if I have to used store bought.) My ribs come out tender, full of flavor, but still nice and juicy.

Jan 12, 2009
cosmkdbree in Home Cooking