satoorisme's Profile

Title Last Reply

Most boring one-dimensional food - Persian Kebab and rice!

Sababa sounds good because I'll be in the area tomorrow. Juno, if it's not too much bother, please do tell what Sababa's must-have items are! Does it compare to Me Va Me (the one at 330 Steeles Ave W, Thornhill)?

Where is the best Mexican in Toronto?

OMG, you've got to be kidding me. The one down in Ajax is an ABSOLUTE DISASTER that puts all other bad Mexican joints to shame. How they managed to take exactly 52 minutes to prepare something so simple as guacamole and quesadilla is just beyond me. This was a take-out order on a slow night, y'know. And, they are CUBAN, not Mexican! Take my advice and do not go to this place, EVER.

KRINOS 100% Goat Milk Feta and Spanakopita (Spanakotyropita)

Which of the three Krinos fetas (100% goat milk, sheep milk, and the greek) that one should use to make spanakopita (spanakotyropita) in order to be as authentic as possible? I'm very curious about this Greek feta from Krinos you mentioned; does that mean they import it from Greece as opposed to their g.m and s.m, which are entirely domestic?

I'd also be very grateful if you could recommend the best of Highland Farms in terms of feta and alikes! I've heard about the Dodonis one as well; I always thought it was available only below the border? Do Highland Farms carry it or do you know of any other places in town that do?

KRINOS 100% Goat Milk Feta and Spanakopita (Spanakotyropita)

So sorry jayt90, but did you mean the three as in both Krinos' g.m and s.m fetas AND the Bulgarian cheese from Highland Farms? And, could you be so kind as to recommend which middle eastern stores in Lawrence and Warden that are not to be missed (for their feta and possibly similar products)? :)

KRINOS 100% Goat Milk Feta and Spanakopita (Spanakotyropita)

Alright, I am a total a noob when it comes to cheese, let alone feta. I understand that there's quite a variety of places in Toronto that one can get hands on good quality feta. Which I plan on exploring at some point.

For the mean time, I chose a shorter path for my suburban convenience by purchasing one at Loblaw's nearby; 100% Goat Milk Feta Cheese from Krinos for the purpose of making Spanakopita, that is. I found the goatiness way too pungent for my palate, but I couldn't detect any of it when I tasted the finished mixture, so that was definitely a bit of relief.

The problem is, I have absolutely no idea what GREAT TRADITIONAL feta should taste like! So, here are my questions to anybody out there that knows... is Krinos 100% g.m. feta worth my money for me to keep using it? How about their 100% s.m. feta? (I haven't tried their s.m. feta yet, but, thinking about it now, it makes more sense that I should've used this one instead since it's usually made from sheep milk, I believe?) If both of them are a no-no, do share the goods, I mean better alternatives in Toronto.

Thanks a mega bunch in advance!

Korean Dogmeat?

AMEN!

Nov 21, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Lunch in St. Lawrence Market?

YES!

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

Korean food is "one of those cuisines where the less authentic it is, the better it tastes"!?!? Elaborate, please.

Buk Chang Dong Soon Tofu - Uptown

NO, NO, NO!

avoid this place, especially the one at this location, at all costs! trust me, it ain't worth even a penny from your pocket.

Korean gam ja tang (split from Ontario board)

Don't they all, I mean, really, dont they all? *sighs*

Mar 09, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Bamiyan Kabob - Afghani Restaurant

Oohhh la la, thanks for the tips! I shall have to check it out:) Is it non-Afghani friendly though?

Korean gam ja tang (split from Ontario board)

No, I haven't seen it, but I do remember hearing about it from family friends who were total maniacs for the soap version of it! Then again, I can't recall the last time I actually watched a Korean movie... I just can't stand them! and that goes the same with their soaps:P

Tteokbokki as we know today is actually the accidental creation of one Korean woman named Ma Bok Rim in the 1950's. But yeah, I've heard about that special tteokbokki that the Chosun kings ate at one time. It's nothing close to what we know today as tteokbokki though... first of all, it's cooked in soysauce marinade, instead of red pepper paste, with lots of beef and the way rice cakes were cut at the time were much thicker and larger than today. It would be much more apt to call the dish a tteokjjim than tteokbokki due to its texture. Nowadays, we have the advantage of machinery that do all the labour-intensive work for us when making tteok, but back then, it had to be done by hand completely, especially gaeraetteok (rice cake that was used to make the dish back then) because of its circle shape. Tteok was also considered relatively rare and prized back and keep in mind of the addition of beef on top of that... So, it's no wonder only the kings and the rich aristocratic folks got to eat it! And, the 100 Foods is a book by the way:P

Mar 06, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Korean gam ja tang (split from Ontario board)

Koreans are known for coming up with new names for their traditional dishes that have existed for hundreds of years before and GJT is no exception to this trend. In fact, GJT was almost an exclusive regional dish in the Jeollado area known as a broth stew made with pork bones up until workers all over Korea moved to Incheon with their families for the construction of Gyoung In Sun (the Seoul-Incheon Line). Naturally, these people brought their regional culinary specialties with them to Incheon and food like Ppyeodaggi Haejanggook(Bone Broth Stew with Beef Bones) and GJT became more or less of staple meals to feed them, which eventually led the dish to become Incheon’s “stolen” specialty. Ask anybody who lives in Incheon for long enough and they will tell you that there are probably more GJT joints in their city than anywhere else in Korea. And, yes, both pork backbones and neck bones have always been used interchangeably when making GJT.

As for the history, Jeollado has a deep-rooted reputation in Korea for their pig rearing __as well as being GJT’s originating region, naturally__ and if you search in any of Korean internet engines such as empas, daum, naver etc., you will have no trouble finding articles that support this fact. If you are fluent in Korean, I highly suggest a further reading of 'The 100 Korean Foods that Koreans Ought to Know' (우리가 정말 알아야 할 우리 음식 백가지) by Han Bok Jin (한복진). I have actually never heard of GJT being eaten during wartimes, but yes, certainly of stuff like all kinds of bone broths, gookbap, barley and brown rice etc... And I, too, also know of several relatives and their acquaintances who share the same sort of disdain for these things because of their experience growing up during hard times. However, I know just as many people from the same generation who crave for the very same things! I noticed that my first cousin twice removed, who served in the Korean War, always makes a point of eating barley rice and virtually almost all of my other relatives from his generation including my grandparents mix their rice with broth, even when they are served in separate bowls, from time to time. Another thing is that they always drink water from the same bowls as they ate and sometimes I even do it for fun... I guess I picked it up by watching them doing it so many times.

Koreans are not the only ones known to have an intense pride for their regional roots and all other sorts of specialties despite it being a small country. But, I can attest that I am a total tojongin who happens to love all Korean food and yes, including all the regional stuff that I know of;)

By the way, contrary to another popular belief, the word ‘Gamja’ which means potato does not refer to the actual potato. It is said the name refers to the meaty part right between pork backbones because of its colour has a striking similarity to broiled potatoes.

Mar 06, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Korean gam ja tang (split from Ontario board)

Nam Jing Lap Bun? Funny, that sounds more Chinese than Korean to me... I don't know about websites but, Soon Dubu (Tofu) literally means uncurdled bean curd. If you add the word jjiggae after Soon Dubu, ya guessed it... uncurdled bean curd stew!

Mar 06, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Need a T.O. restaurant - cool vibe, great food, 4 can eat/drink for $400 or under

second vote for Foxley!

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

If you do plan on going to the Galleria Korean Supermarket, make a must stop at Kiva's Bagel Bakery & Restaurant, which is about 5 minutes away by drive from the GKS... their bagels might be a tad on the salty side for some Korean palates, but I'm absolutely in love with them along with all sorts of other pastry goodies! there's also a casual resto right next to the bakery, have yet to try that one myself so I can't say much but I've heard some good things about their matza ball soup though! Do make another stop at Tavazo, a nice little Iranian place which is about a few blocks down by drive from the GKS... it's the ultimate go-to place for my nut/dried goodies fix whenever I'm in the area! must try their roasted pistachios, almonds and a variety of their dried fruits... so so gooood!

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

I am sorry, but as a fellow Korean, I feel that I've gotta be real with you on this one... avoid Buk Chang Dong Soon Tofu at all costs unless a cheap and below-mediocre "boonshik" type of meal in a quasi-cramped space is your cup of tea. For all it's worth, BCDST used to be tolerable but, it's gone DOWNHILL for god-knows-how-long. There are two locations and personally, I find the one in North York is the worst of the two.

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

um, I am sorry, but I am going to have to partially disagree with you on that one. The only greasy and "messy" kind of gamjatang you are referring to are the ones that are found virtually in all of the cheap and forgettable mom-and-pops Korean joints in town... pretty inevitable with all those useless artificial flavorings and cheapass fatty bones they use. If made properly with fresh ingredients, it's actually a very hearty and healthy dish. If you have a big and wide stone pot at home, try making GJT at home and it'll make a great base for some kickass scorchy (think nurungji) fried rice after you're done eating GJT!

Visiting Toronto - Must-Try Restaurants?

I second the Hodo Kwaja place on Bloor, one of the best and cheap Korean snacks in t.dot ever!

Weezie’s – A breath of fresh air (review + pics)

I was so crushed that they took off the cauliflower soup, the salted cod cakes and the salmon niçoise! they still have the beef tartare though... definitely give the braised oxtail ribs poutine a go! so, so goooood!

Good butcher in Scarborough-Markham area?

OMG I've been dying to get my hands on some gooood ol' naturally raised meat around Durham Region! Beefconnections sounds like a total saviour for me, well at least for now... have you tried any of their products? good or bad? anything I should avoid? your valuable tips will be greatly appreciated!

Weezie’s – A breath of fresh air (review + pics)

Just came back from birthday + anniversary dinner there with the fam. Two words = SIMPLY SUBLIME! We kicked it off with one app. which was a braised short ribs poutine... ribs were succulent and tender almost to perfection! wish it was thick cut fries instead of frites though and they were a little on the salty and burnt side. The tiny balls of mozzarella in it were a tad cold and some of them weren't even melted at all! The ribs and gravy were a saving grace on this dish tonight. For mains, we ordered 1 pan-fried arctic char, scallops, mac-n-cheese, and burger with frites! Pretty simple bistro fare but splendidly executed. The only mishaps were the frites which we again found a bit too salty and burnt (+ even too puny for frites) and mac-n-cheese was a tad oily for my liking but, my sister, who happens to be a big fan of mac-n-cheese, loved it. Oh, one more thing (my apology to all my fellow chowhoundites because this one has nothing to do with the food), the fact that our server was such a hunk with a deep sexy voice was just icing on the cake we didn't even have, HA! Thanks for the megawesome review again, BokChoi!

Newly opened: La Tortillaria

LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE this place. It's my numero uno go-to place to get my tortilla fix in town!

I Love Vinegar!!!!!!!!!

I like my fries with some good ol' white vinegar.... call it canadiana or whatever you want, but I love it!

Feb 20, 2009
satoorisme in General Topics

Galeria Korean Supermarket on Yonge n of Steeles

This post being "somewhat dated" doesn't change the fact that the GKS's prepared items still range from mediocre to downright nasty at best. Trust me, I would know because my mother and I go shop there at least twice a month. As for the tofu stand, the products are passable (I've had better ones in my life... perhaps I can confess that I count myself as lucky and a little spoiled because I get my tofus most of the time from my friend's step-grandpa who has been making them at home for years). They also sell soy milk, which I found it makes a delightful base for kongguksu (Korean noodle dish served in a ice cold soy milk). I'm not sure which seaweed you are referring to... but, I am going to assume that you meant the commercial brands that come in those packages of little boxes and yes, they are fine enough. I appreciate your last point but, if the GKS are going to offer all those prepared banchans and other Korean food at all in the first place, I just wish they would put more efforts in making them right. That's just my two cents.

Galeria Korean Supermarket on Yonge n of Steeles

I have no intention of raining on anybody's parade but, I find all of Galleria K.S.'s prepared foods from mildly tolerable to terrible. As for the quality of meals served at their mini food court, there is nothing fancy or memorable to speak of... just affordable and mediocre Korean food served cafeteria style at best. However, don't miss the vendor outside the GKS that sells kickass hotteok (Korean stuffed pancakes), bungeoppang (Korean Taiyaki) and eeomuk dipped in dried anchovy broth... nothing like those three to warm you up during winter!

Galeria Korean Supermarket on Yonge n of Steeles

Korean really loves their beef (there are more than 150 ways of preparing a beef soup in Korean cuisine) and when it comes to a cow meat, Koreans don't like to waste anything, and yes, that means almost all of the offals.

Weezie’s – A breath of fresh air (review + pics)

Is Weezie's open on Sundays?

La Bella Managua

Awesome! What are some of their other dishes would you recommend?