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Coming to D.C. in April...We know nothing!! Need some good recs.

I just had lunch in the Cafe at the Museum of American Indian -- it was great. I had a pumpkin seed tamal and a glorious smoked green apple soup. They have a range of selections based on AI regional groupings -- several things like fry bread and tacos are non-adventurous kid friendly and the roasted pheasant with cherry sauce is not anything I've seen in a museum before. It's cheaper if you're a smithsonian member - my two dishes and drink were 15. And the museum is great to boot!

Not so touristy food in touristy DC

Consider going to the cafe in the Museum of American Indian, I just had a lunch of pumpkin seed tamal and a glorious hot smoked green apple soup. Both were a very pleasant surprise. They vary the food regularly and they have regional selections every day -- included today were fry bread with honey, a beautiful pheasant with cherry sauce, and an amazing looking stew.

Tuna’s End

sad...just sad.

Jun 27, 2010
jwernimo in Food Media & News

6 days in Capetown

We were just in CT for two weeks -- Long St is good for nightlife -- there's a great DJ at a place called The Waiting Room (there is a small cover) and they have a roof top patio. The restaurant downstairs, "The Royal Eatery," is a great place for unusual burgers -- including ostrich and several spicy pork creations. Get one with a chocolate shake, they're delicious. There's a bar further up near Kloof called Rafiki's that was very popular during the games. Also consider Sapphire in Camps Bay (where we stayed) and other local beach side bars in Camps Bay. Lots of people are around for the sunsets there which are spectacular.

For food -- I must second a previous chow recommendation to go to The Codfather in Camps Bay -- the name is terrible but the food is great. You order seafood by weight and they prepare it for you with veg and rice. I've never had such delicious prawns or langos -- the price can add up depending on what you get, so let your waiter know your price range. They also have 1/2 price sushi for lunch and we found the fish and seafood to be very very fresh both times we were there.

I'd second the Aubergine recommendation and it's definitely worth wearing a coat there and making a reservation -- the room is small. We enjoyed oysters, fresh prawns and large crayfish (more the size of a small lobster), blesbok, and several deserts that we shared. The duck liver appetizer was creamy, rich, and perfect.

We had a fabulous meal, the best of the trip in fact, at the Round House in Camps Bay -- the service was impeccable and the chefs tasting menu with wine pairing was wonderful. The Camembert/apple cheese course was a revelation and perfect for a cool evening and the souffle exquisite. The menus at both Aubergine and Round House include local favorites like warthog and blesbok and are worth the try

We also had fabulous oysters at The Twankey Bar in Cape Town -- they have other small tapas, but not a full menu. A lunch at Mint, which is a sister operation, was good but not stunning.

Friends did the wineries, and enjoyed them, but were not overwhelmed. We managed to have wines from all of the local wineries by asking at dinners to have our wine pairing to feature local wines and we found several we liked a great deal.

If you're driving to Cape Point and/or Simons Town for the penguins (both recommended) stop and have lunch or breakfast in Simon's Town at The Meeting Place -- which is on the main road. Absolutely delicious and inexpensive fresh salads and sandwiches and the pastries smelled divine. If you're more fish and chips at the time, choose The Salty Dog (right on the pier) which came recommended by our boat captain as the only place to go and order the hake for a few rand more. We did both and would return.

Salt has a bistro across the street in Sea Point that is worth the time for breakfast/lunch/picnic food. We actually had our best breakfasts on the main strip in Sea Point -- there are several to choose from.

I'd recommend avoiding the food on the V& A Waterfront, despite other recommendations to the same we found ourselves there hungry and tired -- it was the worst meal of the trip.

Enjoy -- we loved cape town!

Jun 27, 2010
jwernimo in Middle East & Africa

Good Eats in Phoenix Area?

We ate at Tuck Shop (http://www.tuckinphx.com/) last night while in town for a long weekend. The place was great -- the atmosphere is lovely and the staff very knowledgeable and professional. The food is a sort of upscale comfort food -- there is a great, slightly spicy clam chowder, a ridiculously crunchy fried chicken with waffles (the interior of the chicken was perfect), fried okra and shrimp, and more. The portions are a little larger than we expected on the starter and small plates -- we could have done one fewer of each and had plenty to eat. A very pleasant dinner out.

In a very different vein I would also recommend Breadfruit -- it's byob Jamaican. The menu is a little limited but we really enjoyed the plantains and the scallops, and the fresh fruit/veg drinks are amazing.

Nov 22, 2009
jwernimo in Phoenix

Park Slope

Ate at Al Di La tonight after reading the posts and it was every bit as good as everyone says. The beet and ricotta ravioli were a revelation!

May 27, 2009
jwernimo in Outer Boroughs

Early Morning Weekday Breakfast/Brunch in Park Slope

'Snice has a great bowl of oatmeal with dried fruit -- it's on 5th Ave. around 2nd or 3rd st. They have vegetarian and egg options too that I've not tried.

May 27, 2009
jwernimo in Outer Boroughs

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

I can see how it might be cliche -- in Pvd it was a relief from the wood paneled bars and white tables with stiff waiters. And the food was always varied, which we liked a lot. With a baby it helps to have a place a bit laid back (however cliche it might be), but we'd like to avoid sacrificing interesting food for comfortable locale. If I come up with something I'll post to let people know. For now we're pondering take-out at Nob Hill.

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

ate at Nob Hill Cafe tonight and had a wonderful gnocchi. Definitely a wait, but worth the ten minutes. A different couple (husband and I went alone to scope out the place) was there with infant and I'm not sure that we'll take our new parent friends there with baby --- but for small groups or couples the place is fantastic Italian with a very reasonable wine list.

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

quirky: our collective favorite restaurant in Providence (where we all went to grad school) is a place called Julian's (http://www.juliansprovidence.com/) where the tables are done in laquer-covered album covers, there's a t.v. in the bathroom playing billy idol videos, and all of the servers have gorgeous tattoos. They serve amazing french toast in the morning and crazy good seasonal items for dinner - including vegetarian friendly tofu creations. It's a neighborhood place with great character, its own distinct personality, and beautifully executed food. I'm beginning to worry it may be one of a kind! Thanks for the info on places where breast feeding would not be welcome, that is what I meant.

restaurants in albuquerque

As requested:
My husband and I just spent the weekend in Albuquerque guided by some posts here on Chowhound. First night we ate at Slate Street which is within walking distance of downtown/convention center. The place is lovely and we had excellent service. We chose to go with a selection of small plates - including portobella mushroom fires with a spicy ketchup (our favorite), calamari (ok), stuffed fried olives (really good but salty!), and a selection of bruschetta (very nicely done). We went back the next morning to the same place for brunch and I have to say the fruit pancakes were absolutely amazing. If you order them a la carte you can avoid the daunting task of eating five. Our second dinner was a Jennifer James 101 and we loved this meal as well. I had quail with foie gras, greens, over pecan pie and it was probably the most sinful meal I've ever had. My husband had the lamb couscous and while he was a bit surprised that the lamb was served stew style (large, very tender chunks) he thought it was well executed. We finished with a poached pear and coffee. The restaurant is very small - around 30 seats total - so reservations are important. The waitstaff was very attentive and knowledgeable, and the ambiance was great (a bit more intimate than Slate St.) If you're looking for a fun bar or coffee at three in the afternoon when everywhere else downtown has closed (!) try the Blackbird Buvette on Central -- very inexpensive drinks, a fun atmosphere, and an outdoor patio not dominated by dancing 20-year olds.

Dec 20, 2008
jwernimo in Southwest

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

unfortunately without a car seat we can't cab it but my husband and I will have several nights on our own and we'll check out Chez Spencer -thanks!

Anyone have any ideas about things accessible via the trolly?

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

thanks for the recommendation - these both look interesting. And we're definitely ok with hoffing it five blocks. I'll let you know how it goes!

quirky, good, sustainable and near Nob Hill?

We will be in town for a conference at the end of the month and meeting friends who have a new small child. We all love good food, especially food that emphasizes local, sustainable, or seasonal cooking/harvesting models. While we might on other occasions go the fine dining route, our friends will be bringing their infant with them. He's lovely and quiet, but we also want to make sure that her feeding her child fits ok with the vibe of the place. We would like to be within walking distance to the Fairmont on Nob Hill.

Many thanks in advance

restaurants in albuquerque

I posted over on another albuquerque thread but we just ate at Slate St. and Jennifer James 101 and enjoyed both a great deal. Slate Street is also open for breakfast/brunch

Oct 22, 2008
jwernimo in Southwest

Albuquerque -- my comments

My husband and I just spent the weekend in Albuquerque guided by some posts here on Chowhound. First night we ate at Slate Street which is within walking distance of downtown/convention center. The place is lovely and we had excellent service. We chose to go with a selection of small plates - including portobella mushroom fires with a spicy ketchup (our favorite), calamari (ok), stuffed fried olives (really good but salty!), and a selection of bruschetta (very nicely done). We went back the next morning to the same place for brunch and I have to say the fruit pancakes were absolutely amazing. If you order them a la carte you can avoid the daunting task of eating five. Our second dinner was a Jennifer James 101 and we loved this meal as well. I had quail with foie gras, greens, over pecan pie and it was probably the most sinful meal I've ever had. My husband had the lamb couscous and while he was a bit surprised that the lamb was served stew style (large, very tender chunks) he thought it was well executed. We finished with a poached pear and coffee. The restaurant is very small - around 30 seats total - so reservations are important. The waitstaff was very attentive and knowledgeable, and the ambiance was great (a bit more intimate than Slate St.) If you're looking for a fun bar or coffee at three in the afternoon when everywhere else downtown has closed (!) try the Blackbird Buvette on Central -- very inexpensive drinks, a fun atmosphere, and an outdoor patio not dominated by dancing 20-year olds.

Oct 22, 2008
jwernimo in Southwest