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Great restaurants near Copley Square?

Headed to Boston for two nights. Any great non-touristy restaurants I should try that are not too far from Copley Square? I'm adventurous, will eat anything, but prefer non-tourist trap, and not ridiculously expensive.

Child-Friendly in MIami for Foodies?

I'll be in Miami for the holiday week, and want some great food restaurants that won't cringe when we show up (at the early seating) with our one year-old.

Halal Chicken and Rice Vendor Recipes? [Moved from Manhattan board]

Use dark meat chicken, like boneless skinless thighs. That is a critical piece of the flavor--the taste of the meat. Breasts taste like nothing. Just like egg whites taste like nothing, and certainly not like eggs.

Apr 27, 2009
jcisrhiannon in Home Cooking

Solo dinner on a Sunday in LA.

Had an amazing meat at Hatfield's a few weeks ago. The food there is top notch, very interesting, tasty, well executed. I recommend it highly.

Osteria Mozza was ok, not a revelation. Mario Batali is a talented chef, but his restaurants are starting to read like a playbook of his old hits, which is never when you want to start eating at a restaurant.

Mar 12, 2009
jcisrhiannon in Los Angeles Area

Thai Basil in Greenwich?

Food here is fantastic. We eat there at least once a week. The menu is more limited, but the execution is as good as (cult favorite) Sripraphai in Woodside, Queens. The food is very spicy.

Venice Restaurants, by a NYC Restaurant Snob

I had heard that Venice was very touristy and that good restaurants in Venice were difficult to find, so prior to my trip, I researched every way I could think of: Chowhound, NY TImes, Michelin, Asmallworld, etc.

Despite the hard work, great meals were in short supply. Even at the supposed "best" restaurants in Venice, I couldn't shake the feeling that the joke was on me. That instead of decking out the restaurant like an ESPN Zone for the sporty-minded tourists, the locals had instead decked out a restaurant to appear "foodie" to cater specifically to tourists like myself.

Long story short, I never had a great meal in Venice. I ate some very decent food, and you will not find terrible food in Italy, so there's that. But even when we decided to spare no expense, we left the table wanting.

Here is a brief summary of the restaurants I tried:

Acqua Pazza - got trapped in the rain and this was the closest restaurant to where we stood. Food was decent, portions were enormous. But it was very expensive given the quality, 32 euro entrees, 28 euro pastas, and the spaghetti I ate was very undercooked. Not al dente, like five minutes undercooked. They had all the tourist favorites: zucchini blossoms, spider crab, etc, but it just felt like they were going through the motions. The decor is very nice. But then the tour groups started to show up and I got the gist.

Osteria alle Testiere - this was probably the best meal of our trip and purportedly one of the best "foodie' restaurants in Venice. The food was better than most of the other meals I ate, and it was good. The desserts were fantastic. But it was not fantastic food. It was somewhat inspired, but expensive, and not that well seasoned. But I'd have to recommend it because it was one of the best meals I had.

Terraza at the Danieli - Our hotel concierge made a mistake about our reservation at MET, which was actually closed on Mondays, and so we walked a few doors down to the Danieli. We knew we were going to get hosed, but braced ourselves. Relative to the ambience and the service level, which are both very high, the prices were not that bad. The food was actually very good, especially the rabbit tagliolini, which was some of the best pasta I've ever eaten.

Al Covo - We heard great things about this place from some Brits we met at Alle Testiere. Skip it. It was all tourists, seems like a foodie place, but the lighting is too bright and the food is very mediocre. Pasta with squash blossoms had exactly two microparticles of squash blossoms in it. That kind of thing. Yes, there is a frenetic American hostess who skitters around the room and talks Texan to guests, and I believe a lot of people see the charm in that. I certainly do, but not in Venice.

Il Buse di Torre - We ate here on a day trip to Murano and were very pleasantly surprised. Don't expect revelations, but the food was very solid and the restaurant was very clean. The calamari fritti was the best we'd had, and for the first time in Venice, I didn't reach for the salt and pepper shakers.

Bistro de Venise - We wandered in here late at night, expecting to have eaten in another city. The guidebook recommended it, and given its location near San Marco and the gilded decor, it seemed like it would be a grade A tourist trap. Instead, it was a very good, very inspired, authentic Venetian meal. Their menu consists of all "historical Venetian" dishes and tells you what century the Venetians made the thing you ate. A bit gimmicky, but the output was of a very high quality. I liked it a lot more than I thought I would have.

4 Fori - ate here for lunch. Cold fish salad was old fish salad, and everything was bland. Not sure how foodies could think this is a great spot. A definite pass.

Overall, don't expect revelations, don't think in dollars because you will feel ripped off. Decent food was had. Don't get so worked up over the restaurants, like I did. Food is not the highlight of a trip to Venice.

Sep 18, 2008
jcisrhiannon in Italy