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How do you eat tinned sardines?

Open can, pour on a little vinegar or hot sauce, eat each sardine on top of a saltine cracker.

Nov 05, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas

pinotho, just caught your reply. Hope you have great trip with many good eating adventures. Let us know of your experiences on this trip.

Nov 04, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

TheSnowpea, hope you can get all those family cooks around that stove and whip up the best batch of pancakes you all have ever had. Let us know how this meal turns out. And think I'm going to be doing some pancakes this weekend myself.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas

Sorry, somehow the entire weblink is just not going to post. If interested, just go to www.gardenandgun.com and then click on the "100 Best Southern Food Map" sticker in the upper right corner to get to the page leading to the article.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Arkansas

My bad. Somehow I messed up the weblink included above. The complete link is

http://gardenandgun.com/stories/featu...

Hope this one goes in its entirety.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Arkansas

pinotho, I mentioned McClard's at Hot Springs this morn and just now came upon this North Carolina magazine list of "Southern Foods You Must Eat Before You Die"
http://gardenandgun.com/stories/featu...
and see that McClard's made the list with its "Spread" under the Meat section. Description is pretty accurate, and as bad as it may sound, it is actually quite good (tho regular barbecue plate better thing to have if just one meal there). See Craig's Barbecue at DeVall's Bluff also made the list. It's OK, but I'd never include it in such a list. See a number of other places with which I'm familiar. Some I agree with; others I don't.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Making gluten free stuffing

macca, let us know how you come out with the stuffing made from the gluten free bread. I've had stuffings made from many different types of bread, but all were wheat based. Will be interesting to see how the gluten free bread based stuffing turns out. Hope well. That "dry run" before Thanksgiving is probably good idea. Restaurant in Pensacola, FL, used to serve a delicious gluten free chocolate cake, substituting ground walnuts for flour. Chef/owner developed it because of her husband's gluten allergies.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Making gluten free stuffing

macca, if for any reason you were unable to obtain satisfactory gluten free breads for your stuffing (dressing), would a stuffing made totally of wheat free cornbread be gluten free (most cornbreads I know of contain some wheat flour and most cornbread stuffings I've had also contain some wheat breads)? Don't know if such would be possible, tasty, or gluten free, but just a thought. Or would one of the Irish potato stuffings which capeanne and I recently discussed be a gluten free alternative?

"I did for a number of years get to enjoy one great dressing at friends in Spanish Fort, AL, which I've never seen anywhere else. Mrs. Lambert, who was originally from up near Birmingham, said she learned it from her Irish mother-in-law. She would boil Irish potatoes and make them into mashed potatoes except would put no milk or cream in them (some butter & a little chicken or turkey broth if needed to moisten them a little). Then she would shred these raw Irish potatoes, rinse & thoroughly ring them out several times (said she was getting the starch out of them) and would then stir the raw shredded potatoes into the cooked mashed potatoes. She would then add onion, celery, giblets, chopped boiled egg, all the traditional things and all the traditional seasonings one would add to regular cornbread dressing to this potato mixture. She would then stir into in this mixture some of the giblet gravy (she usually cooked a hen in addition to the turkey for added broth, giblets, gravies, etc.), place the potato dressing around (not in) the partially done turkey and prepare an extra pan of it, all of which she would then top with a light coating of giblet gravy and cook it in the oven as the turkey finished roasting. She would not serve mashed potatoes with her "turkey dinner" as I was accustomed to having, for in the "dressing" she had both the potatoes and dressing. This really was good but seemed to me that it was an awful lot of work, more so than making regular dressing and mashed potatoes. Maybe that is reason I've never seen or heard of it elsewhere, but it was something really good, interesting, & different."

Then when capeanne posted her family's Irish Potato stuffing recipe, my statement re never hearing of such otherwise became untrue, plus capeanne's recipe sounds much easier but just as delicious as Mrs. Lambert's.

"Sure it is totally simple and my Paternal Grandmother started it...we use both Yukons and one large Russet ,boil as usual and coarsely mash. add finely chopped celery and finely chopped onion, S&P and Bells Seasoning .a small amount of half and half for the consistency you desire . In the days that my Grandmother and Parents made them they stuffed the turkey with it ...I have recently made it as a side dish and bake it for the last 45 minutes that the bird is in...we never used exact measurements ...just kinda toss it together til it looks right..if you can get your crowd off mashed potatoes this is a delicious substitute and is killer with turkey gravy !"

Neither the totally wheat free cornbread stuffing idea nor one of the Irish potato stuffings may be viable alternatives for you, but just a couple of thoughts. Surely is thoughtful of you to be concerned about finding a satisfactory stuffing substitute so that all the family can continue to enjoy your complete Thanksgiving dinner.

and

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas

pinotho, I just checked some of your many interesting posts and see you are apparently from the Dallas area, so assume you likely will be traveling from Dallas to Texarkana, on up I-30 to detour by Hot Springs, and then into Little Rock. Unfortunately I'm not as familiar with that stretch of highway as I am with I-40 from Memphis to Little Rock, and all my directional references were in terms of traveling from east to west, whereas apparently you will be traveling west to east (which makes Cotham's at Scott just past rather than just before Little Rock). And if you had time, you could detour from Texarkana across south Arkansas to Magnolia and Star City to hit Backyard Barbecue and The Village Steak House and then go on into Little Rock, but that would definitely be a considerably circuitous, out of your way, route. A neat place along that route is Abe's Old Feed House at little community of Lawson just east of El Dorado - its a delicious catfish, barbecue (and many other foods) buffer housed in old country store at this little crossroads community. Only open Thurs. thru Sat. evenings.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Arkansas

Thanks, pinotho. As said, hope you all have great trip to Arkansas. Believe Catfish Barn is the name of the catfish restaurant I was trying to think of in Bryant. Along I-30 in Bryant-Benton area there is a big Brown's Buffet with lots of advertising. Have never been there but have heard widely ranging reports from good to awful. Probably one comment I heard, "OK if you aren't expecting too much", is most accurate. Believe likely you can do better. Both Little Rock & Hot Springs are full of restaurants of all sorts from plate lunch and "meat & three" types, barbecue, catfish, ethnic, to some really fancy, "gourmet", "big city type" restaurants. Just check around and you will find plenty places of all sorts at which to eat in both cities. Oh, just thought, don't know how I failed to mention McClard's Barbecue in Hot Springs. Definitely go there for some great barbecue (and also hot tamales) as well as for the experience - always crowed, rushed, but old, fun place with fine food. And in Little Rock you might want to try Doe's Eat Place - great burgers, tamales, etc. all the way up to huge steaks (have heard it's as good as the Original Doe's in Greenville, MS - which I've never tried). It's also in funky old building. Again, you all have great trip & visit.

Oct 29, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

The Snowpea - Sounds like pancakes are quite the thing in your family, and hope you all get to soon experience that good family pancake supper. My pancakes are more along the lines of your husband's. Talking with friend today who is active in Kiwanis Club (a civic club); they are busy preparing for their annual day long pancake breakfast (an annual charity fund raising event) later this week. Karo Syrup is a corn based syrup. Tho there are some other varieties now which I think are more suitable as an "eating" syrup, their classics are light & dark Karo which are, in my opinion at least, more suited to cooking (have you ever heard of Karo Pecan Pie?) than eating. Agree with you about the pure maple syrup and am looking forward to (at least hoping for) my annual Christmas gift of such. If pure maple isn't available, there are several other syrups I prefer to Karo for pancakes & waffles. Be careful and avoid overflowing machines of all sorts.

Oct 27, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas

pinotho, see discussion of various Little Rock and I-40 restaurants in Arkansas Delta topic in this section ( http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/555007 ). Would recommend Cothams (especially the one down at Scott, little detour off I-40 just before Little Rock) for its goodness & uniqueness, if in area at time it's open (11A - 2P Mon. - Thurs; 11A - 8P Fri. & Sat.). I'd still give Whole Hog Barbecue in Little Rock a try despite my recent disappointment there. Ole Sawmill Cafe in Forrest City is good country cooking (both order & buffet, with catfish on Fri. & Sat.) and there is a good catfish restaurant at Caldwell community just north of Forrest City. You'll find good catfish restaurants all over the state, tho. Recommend Ed & Kay's right on I-30 in Benton (between Little Rock & Hot Springs) for breakfasts, plate lunches, pies. There is good catfish place right on north side of I-30 in Bryant (near Benton) but can't remember its name. Coy's Steak House in Hot Springs has excellent reputation, but my one meal there was worst steak I've ever eaten, with service even worse than the steak. Highly recommend Layne's Steak House in The Village at Star City and Backyard Barbecue in Magnolia if you should somehow get south of your mentioned route. Hope you have good trip through and lots of good meals in Arkansas.

Oct 27, 2008
foodisgreat in Central South

What is Your Favorite Non-Foodie Thanksgiving Dish?

Hi, coll. I think this apple salad (or "fruit salad" as it was called in the family) was some version of, variation on the Waldorf Salad theme.

Oct 25, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

alkapal, this sounds like more similarities in our backgrounds, unfortunately so in these instances, but as bad as my waffle experience was, your dishwasher experience was even worse. Condolences! Fortunately, neither of our experiences as bad as that of friends who recently had washing machine malfunction while they gone, flooding nearly entire house and requiring replacement of most carpet, tile, & hardwood flooring in the home. Guess the old saying about "as bad off as you are, you can always find someone in even worse shape" is true in all these cases.

Oct 24, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

What is Your Favorite Non-Foodie Thanksgiving Dish?

Any kind of dressing (stuffing) is great as long as its made mainly from cornbread rather than wheat breads. Something like 2 parts cornbread to one part wheat bread (toasted bread, rolls, or biscuits), the items you mention, revsharkie, plus some turkey broth, giblets, chopped hard boiled egg. Everyone to his own thing, but to me dressing mixes are highly preferable to light bread (wheat breads) dressings, even homemade. And in the Home Cooking thread I earlier mentioned an Irish Potato dressing made by friends in Alabama which was lots of work but was absolutely delicious.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

What is Your Favorite Non-Foodie Thanksgiving Dish?

Leftovers of all sorts are about as good as the Thanksgiving meal. I may have just missed it, but a favorite leftover when I was growing up was turkey hash (same as roast beef hash but just using turkey rather than roast beef).

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

What is Your Favorite Non-Foodie Thanksgiving Dish?

Indeed, for Thanksgiving & Christmas break out that antique cut glass for pickles, black & green olives, celery (both stuffed & unstuffed). Only times those dishes & trays ever used.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

What is Your Favorite Non-Foodie Thanksgiving Dish?

I'd read this far in this most interesting thread and was fearful I was not going to find Ambrosia mentioned. This was an absolute "must" for every Thanksgiving & Christmas meal at our home and homes of all relatives on both sides of the family - though I do not know why, for to me its taste does not anywhere near justify all the work involved. Know there are many, many versions of ambrosia, but that made by all in our family was a very simple recipe - fresh cut up oranges, canned crushed pineapple, and coconut (preferably from fresh coconut). Grating that coconut and especially fooling with cutting up all those juicy, sticky oranges just was not worth it to me. Think if needed they also put a little sugar into the ambrosia, but no whipped cream, other fruits, jello, etc. as other ambrosias I've had sometimes contain. I actually liked what the folks called "fruit salad" better than ambrosia. Can't remember all details but was chopped apples, pecans, celery (and think maybe at times raisins, Mandrin orange slices, and maybe some other fruits), but apples, pecans, celery were main ingredients, lightly moistened with mayonnaise. And I can never think of holiday meals and coconut without thinking of a coconut cake (made from fresh coconut) by one aunt every Thanksgiving & Christmas. Absolutely best coconut cake I've ever eaten. After Aunt Vera died, both my mother and other aunt tried to make the cake using her recipe exactly, but neither could ever get their cakes to come out nearly as good as was Aunt Vera's.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

My bad, apologies - I said Snowpea, but see it was you, Bubbles, and not Snowpea who had the two weeks exclusive pancake diet. Bubbles, I do hope that any current pancake adventures are most delicious and enjoyable.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

snowpea and bubbles, your pancake stories are a lot more touching than my waffle story. I always had pretty good luck with pancakes so have no experiences with them to relate, but once was given old waffle iron by some friends I'd helped move. No instructions with it & I'd never made any waffles, but one cold, dreary, winter afternoon decided I'd make some waffles for supper. Went to store & got box of pancake & waffle mix, read instructions on package and made up recipe for what package said was for four waffles. Looked into waffle iron and saw four sections, thought that was what recipe was referring to, so poured entire batch I'd made up into waffle iron & closed lid. In just a bit that top started rising and waffle batter started flowing out of all sides of the waffle iron. I started trying to wipe it up from counter top but just couldn't keep up with it - it was running into sink, onto floor, down the counter, against the wall - just everywhere. Put a couple of trash cans around to try to catch some of it running onto floor and kept wiping & scooping a while, but finally just gave up, went over & sat in chair & waited till all had finished running everywhere. Then cleaned up the mess & the waffle iron, made some pancakes with remaining mix, & had rather unenjoyable supper. The dismal weather didn't help matters either. Have never attempted to make waffles since (other than those at motel breakfasts). Stupid me didn't know the amount of batter I'd made & poured into iron all at once was meant for four different pourings. Snowpea, I like pancakes, but feel for you with nothing but pancakes to eat for two weeks straight - and with Karo syrup to go on them! At least I hope it was dark Karo rather than clear Karo. And did you have any butter or margarine to go on them? If you do decide to do pancakes again now, I hope that you really, really enjoy them.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Looking for great pecans

dd992emo, agree with you about Underwood Pecans at Foley. Also Tanner's Pecans in Mobile and Dees' Pecans just west of Mobile are usually good pecan sources. Both can be found with google search. Over the years when living in the area it was my experience that most any Baldwin or Mobile Co., Alabama pecans - from companies, stands, individuals - were good. But I also don't know how their crops are this year.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in General South Archive

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

chilihead, oakjean, dexters - I don't believe that the "slurping the morning coffee from the saucer" practice necessarily had anything to do with a Scandanavian heritage, but believe it was more of a taste preference & generational thing. My dad did the same thing & his ancestors were from Scotland, but so far back that he never knew any of them. I know the reason for his "coffee from the saucer" was to cool the coffee. In fact, he'd often put an ice cube in the cup of coffee to cool that while he "slurped from saucer" his first coffee. Then he'd drink the remaining coffee from the cup. He & I are certainly opposites when it comes to way we liked our coffee. I can hardly get mine hot enough and he could hardly get his cool enough. In fact, he liked all of his foods much cooler than I like mine.

Oct 23, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas Delta Region

scotter, on way home from Little Rock yesterday I detoured by Scott for a hubcap at Cotham's. So good!!! Definitely better than the ones at Cotham's in the City in Little Rock (tho those aren't bad). There's a barbecue restaurant coming into Scott at which I'd never before seen more than 2 or 3 cars. Yesterday there were as many or more cars at it than were at Cotham's (which had customers to point there was a wait for tables). And I noticed a sign advertising a new restaurant in Scott, tho never saw it. Hard to imagine Scott & surrounding area having enough population to support three restaurants, altho people come from all over the state & from out of state to Cotham's. Yesterday's hubcap was especially good, more than making up for recent disappointment at Whole Hog. Hope you are getting to have some good eating adventures.

Oct 19, 2008
foodisgreat in General South Archive

Arkansas Delta Region

scotter, I was in LIttle Rock Tuesday & had lunch at original Whole Hog on Cantrell. Guess first time I've eaten there in about a year. While good, it definitely was not up to its usual standard. For first time ever I would say that when comparing July & August Magnolia Backyard Barbecue meals with this week's meal at Whole Hog that Backyard comes out significantly better on all counts (meat & sides). Always previously rated the two places as about equal (best in state). Hope I just got an "off plate" or caught Whole Hog on an "off day" - that its overall quality is not deteriorating. Just wondered what your recent experience had been.

Oct 11, 2008
foodisgreat in General South Archive

Home cooked, or assembled food/foodie gifts for Christmas, new ideas?

Firegoat, if you have any pecan (or I guess any other nut) trees on your farm, you might consider nut gifts. It has always been my experience that friends & family without such trees like nothing better than a gift of pecans (preferably shelled - or some of both if a big gift). Have at times sent sugared, spiced, etc. pecan halves, but believe just regular pecans (for use as gift recipients desire) are more appreciated. Homemade jams, jellies, butters, preserves, etc. as well as homemade relishes have always been popular gifts with me - both to give & receive. Homemade breads (a cranberry-pumpkin one is my favorite) and homemade cheese straws are two of my favorites to receive - as I seldom make the breads & never the cheese straws.

Sep 18, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

I love fritters

All of these are very interesting & informative posts to me for my fritter knowledge & experience is very limited. Have had a few corn fritters which were OK, but just not my very favorite food. From all these posts, I'm wondering if what I thought all these years was a fritter which I loved was actually that or was something else. A standard Navy breakfast was called pineapple fritters - little balls or clumps of fried dough containing pineapple chunks which were served with maple syrup - so delicious - as good as or better than any pancakes or waffles. Was actually my favorite Navy breakfast. Never heard of or saw them served anywhere else. I surely need to broaden my fritter knowledge & experience - perhaps try to make the pineapple fritters in lieu of some waffles or pancakes - and definitely try to get into some of the so delicious sounding vegetable and/or spicy fritters mentioned in these posts. Reading these posts has been a most worthwhile learning experience. Thanks, all.

Sep 18, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Arkansas Delta Region

Hi, LauraMick. I agree with you that Craig's is good but it doesn't do quite as much for me as it does for you. Know to me, it's just not at the Whole Hog or Backyard level. Is the "Pie Shop" across US 70 now open? Know it used to be, then for a while they were still making the pies, but you had to buy them from Craig's. Can you now get them again from the shop itself? Did you eat at both Morgan Freeman's Clarksdale restaurants? I've not tried either, but your comments re experiences of your group are exactly same as those I've heard from all others who have ever eaten at either - very spotty, some good, some bad. I do recommend The Dutch Oven for lunch in Clarksdale. And you might well like Abe's Barbecue there. Not the building but the barbecue has to me always seemed somewhat similar to Craig's.

Sep 17, 2008
foodisgreat in General South Archive

Arkansas Delta Region

Thanks so much, scotter, for your so interesting & informative post re Backyard Barbecue; so much more to it than I ever knew, realized. Always such a line to place order there at noon, I hate to hold up line with my indecision. Plus, its one of those places, like so many, when hit on a meal which don't feel can be surpassed, just stay with it, reluctant to try anything different, especially when get there only few times a year. My standard order is either a large brisket or pork sandwich plate. Guess only other thing I've ever ordered is BBQ stuffed potato. Also have occasionally tried one of those pies or the banana pudding. Have heard the ribs & onion rings praised; from looks of them at others' tables, can understand why. In fact, can't imagine anything there not being just great. But I wasn't aware of its custom cooking - the holiday smoked hams & turkeys. Can just imagine how good they are! Familiar with many fried veggies, but not broccoli. Will surely have to try it on next visit. I'd really be hard pressed to say which I like the best - Magnolia's Backyard or LR's Whole Hog. Like said initially, guess it's a tie with me, but those definitely my two favorite barbecues of all I've ever tried anywhere. Surely have never found any in Memphis to equal either. I've never eaten at any of the Whole Hogs other than original but knew of the one in NLR. Was shocked recently, tho, to learn of the great number of franchise operations which now exist. Surely glad to hear you say they are good. When learned of the many franchise spots, wrote friends in Illinois and Alabama who I've made Whole Hog, Backyard, and Village Steak House fans that hoped such wide expansion didn't bring damage to Whole Hog's overall reputation & quality.

Absolutely agree with you that Cotham's in the City is not as good as Scott Cotham's. Think, tho, "the City" comes closer to Scott with its hubcaps than it does with its plate lunches. And am sure Scott Cotham's housing & location are part of its PLUS as well as any food differences. Good thing I don't live near either. If did, fear too many hubcap lunches would have my middle even more expanded than it already is.

Hope you can get down to The Village near Star City soon, scotter, for a The Village (Layne's) Steak House meal. Anything is wonderful, but I alway stick with beef. And if you like a smoked flavor, I strongly recommend the smaller smoked prime rib, but if don't like smoked flavor, then go with a steak. And hope you have time to explore the shops while there. All are great - excellent selections and even better customer service; best of that I've ever seen. And I'd surely be interested to hear of any other LR or Arkansas recommendations which you have. Thanks.

Sep 17, 2008
foodisgreat in General South Archive

Cookbook With Easy Everyday Meals? Suggestions?

Although many of the recipes in many such cookbooks will be too elemental & commonplace to "push your family's food horizons" and to keep from "boring you to tears", I wonder if anything appropriate might be found in any of the many "community" (especially Junior League but also school, church, civic club, etc.) cookbooks which seem to be published everywhere. Know there are often recipe duplications in these various cookbooks, but I have found some interesting things in some of them. Although a commercial rather than organizational cookbook, the Savannah, GA, "The Pirates' House Cook Book" contains individually contributed as well as restaurant recipes, a number of which I have found quite appealing. Know this is not the type recipe you are seeking, but as a kid my aunt made an asparagus-English pea casserole which I loved and which later was one of several favorite recipes lost during a move. Over the years was surprised I never found this casserole recipe in any of these community cookbooks (or found anyone who made it) so was really pleased when finally found it in this "Pirates' House" cookbook several years ago. I also like, although again they may largely be too commonplace for your purposes, many of the recipes in the several Social Circle, GA, "Blue Willow Inn" cookbooks (which are again restaurant & individually contributed recipes). The recipes in the cookbooks I've mentioned primarily meet you "readily available ingredients" and "not too much time/work" specifications but may fall short on your "real cooks use" requirement. Good luck in your recipe search and in coming up with those new expansive (no pun intended) meals for your family.

Sep 15, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

You are certainly 100 per cent correct, alkapal, in your praise of cornbread crumbled into pea pot likker (good in greens pot likker but better in that of peas). My dad was like you, with cream peas being his favorite, but somehow I like purple hulls best of all. However, all field peas are so wonderfully delicious it really doesn't much matter what kind I have. And you are right about the problem of balancing the proportions of peas & pot likker (or just pot likker if all the peas are gone) with the cornbread. I fear at times I am guilty of purposely getting the mixture out of balance as an excuse for adding more of one or the other & thereby getting more of the total to eat. Of course this mixture then has to be tempered with a little vinegar to make it "curdle" just right. Oh, so good!!!

Sep 14, 2008
foodisgreat in Home Cooking