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LorenzoGA's Profile

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Tuna Heart Source

Now THAT is a tuna heart.

Tuna Heart Source

I'm glad someone else said this because that was my first thought. I have seen jars just like that in Italy, labeled "cuore di tonno" just as on the pictured jar, and wondered whether it was actually the heart of a tuna or whether the word was used figuratively to mean the center or core--the supposed meatiest part.

I do understand that the heart of a tuna is considered a delicacy. But I have not seen anything in a glass jar like the one pictured that resembled a heart, which would be dark in color.

All You Can Eat Lionfish, an over population solution

Mmm. Lionfish-stuffed grouper!

My Family Doesn't Eat My Cooking

I'm not a marriage counselor, but if you and your husband have enough else in common, then my advice is to just forget about the difference in food ideology and let him eat what he wants.

When I met my wife, our common food ideology was one of the most important things we saw in each other. A major difference in how we approached food--cooking, eating, nutrition, restaurants, etc.--would have been a no go for a relationship.

Feb 26, 2015
LorenzoGA in Not About Food

Jewish meal

Exactly. So I would advise the OP to not fret over authenticity or the idea of making it kosher and just make some stereotypical dishes, for the fun of it, like chicken matzo ball soup and brisket. Isn't the point here, if I'm understanding it correctly, to have fun with the new discovery of ancestry? Kosher is not necessary and may be a bit burdensome to do strictly.

Feb 26, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

We've all hit the Pyrex ceiling

Something I've noticed in this discussion is that the original post seemed to make a point of trying to avoid Euro-centrism by mentioning pho and baguettes in Hanoi, but the thread couldn't seem to avoid returning to discussing the "fundamentals" in the context of classic French cuisine. Is it hard for some of us to avoid a Euro-centric bias?

Feb 25, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

Ubiquitous pimiento cheese...Athens, Georgia

Interesting comment. I'd eat head cheese before I'd eat pimento cheese.

Feb 25, 2015
LorenzoGA in Southeast

Ubiquitous pimiento cheese...Athens, Georgia

Not just a pan-South thing, but it has "spread" (pun) to other parts of the US, riding the relatively recent wave of discovery of Southern food. I guess we can thank the Internet for popularizing what were once local items virtually unknown in other regions. So nowadays we are accustomed to seeing pimento cheese in Los Angeles and fish tacos in Chicago.

Personally, I don't care for pimento cheese, Red Velvet Cake, grits, and other things that have somehow made it into the mainstream well outside the South. I had never eaten any of these things or even heard of many of them (grits would be the exception) until moving to the South.

Feb 25, 2015
LorenzoGA in Southeast

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

Well said. That's all folks. (For me, that is.)

Feb 24, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

So you are saying you advocate encouraging someone who has never before eaten sushi of any type to eat at a sushi bar for your first date, even if that person seems reluctant?

If so, then I respectfully change my initial reply to "Disagree." A first date is generally not the time to explore a new cuisine, unless of course the person insists they want to try it.

Your hiking analogy is apt. I've gone on a hike or two as a first date with someone whom I already knew enjoyed hiking. But there's no way I would cajole someone into going for a hike as a first date who professes not to enjoy outdoors or exercise. Of course, I would never ask such a person out in the first place.

Feb 24, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

"His point #3 implies that sushi dining can be a screen process against people who do not like sushi."

That is the most bizarre logic I can imagine. Why not screen vegetarians out by taking dates to steakhouses?

Feb 24, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

I replied to his original post, but I regret I have not kept up with the debate. I interpreted the original post as meaning we're talking about two people who like sushi. If that were not a given, then someone else might as well start a thread that theorizes a steakhouse is a good first-date choice, even if one's date is a vegetarian, so one can weed out vegetarian foodies who aren't open-minded to trying meat. That makes no sense to me.

But seeing the post below in response to my interjection here, I do believe I am mistaken as to the OP's premise. Oy.

Feb 24, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

Do people really (and I mean "really") like Girl Scout Cookies?

I thought they were made by elves. No, wait, that's the other brand.

Feb 23, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

Where can I get frozen raccoons?

I left California for the promise of a better job and now have to tolerate living in the South, with all the nasty food they eat here, and you who are privileged to live in food mecca actually SEEK OUT raccoon?

For the record, I have not met anyone who admits to having eaten raccoon. Squirrel, yes. Them's good eatin'.

I suppose in order to be legally sold commercially, they would have to be farm-raised. If you've bought them before, then it seems there is a raccoon farm and USDA raccoon abattoir somewhere. Wow.

Feb 23, 2015
LorenzoGA in Los Angeles Area

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

Maybe I'm mistaken, but I read it as implicit in the original post that we're talking about two people who both like sushi. If we don't start from that premise, then the question makes no sense. Is the OP really asking if a sushi-lover should coax someone who doesn't love sushi out to a sushi bar for their first date?

Feb 23, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

Consider searching for love in Japan.

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

well played!--"unisexual"!

Feb 22, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

I read this as inconsistent or contradictory: "Dating for me was never pass/fail. If we were compatible, we'd go out again. If not, then we wouldn't."

Compatible = meets my threshold standards = go out again = pass.
Incompatible = does not meet my threshold standards = not go out again = fail.

If the goal of dating is to find someone compatible enough to sustain a longer relationship, then the first date is inherently a pass/fail proposition. Some pass the first date test, and some don't.

Sorry, but I'm apparently missing some subtlety here.

Feb 22, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

Isn't "testing" the whole purpose of a first date? Whether one's "standards" place a lot of weight on what one eats or no weight at all, the whole purpose of a first date is to test the waters, to see what two people have in common.

Feb 22, 2015
LorenzoGA in General Topics

The best first date spot, especially for foodies: the Sushi Bar. Agree or Disagree?

Agree. When I was single, I had a number of sushi bar first dates. It's a happy medium between intimate dining and group dining--a transitional phase, if you will. Informal in atmosphere, yet as serious or as carefree as one wants to make it by what one orders. Toro? Uni? California roll?

And I agree that one can tell a lot by what one's date wants to eat, though that is hardly limited to sushi. Sure, there are maki-only people and there are nigiri-only people and all kinds in between. I recall one first date in a seafood restaurant. I looked on with approval as she ordered a "calamari steak" (a big piece of squid, not an uncommon dish in California). You can see the punchline coming: she was shocked when it arrived, because she had thought she was ordering beef and didn't want to look uninformed by asking what it was. We did not have a second date.

a very specific Paris food search

Could be a regional thing. My wife grew up in West Flanders but lived many years in Brussels.

When we make croques at home, she refuses to use bechamel. She believes it's more of a French thing but admits she really never gave it much thought.

Feb 21, 2015
LorenzoGA in France

a very specific Paris food search

Interesting. My wife spent most of her life in Belgium and says the bechamel version is uncommon. That's been my observation, too, from the relatively small number I've eaten there. Maybe Belgian restaurants are increasingly looking to the French version? Maybe they realize people LIKE bechamel.

Feb 21, 2015
LorenzoGA in France

Going to China: What Soy Sauce to Buy

Assuming "grassroots" means what is more commonly referred to as "artisanal," to the extent there are any artisanal soy sauces available for purchase in China, are they better than those we can buy in the US? Or is this quest kind of like an American buying sea salt on a trip to France, as though the same French sea salt isn't sold in the US?

Granted, the OP is not located in the US. Not aiming this question directly at you :)

Why aren't we eating more geese?

I fried latkes in duck fat, but cooking a whole goose for Passover AND getting enough rendered fat for latkes is an even better idea.

"Goostrami"!

Not to Miss Eateries in Rome

You put that so politely and diplomatically!

Feb 20, 2015
LorenzoGA in Italy

Why aren't we eating more geese?

You're clearly in the minority if you are a North American and the only thing preventing you from cooking goose "all the time" is the cost. As you probably appreciate, duck renders out a LOT of fat, and goose renders out something like five times more. Sure, there are people like you who don't see dealing with a big, bony, unwieldy goose and ladling out fat periodically as being difficult, but I just cannot imagine the average home cook in my part of the world cooking goose as often as duck, or cooking duck as often as chicken. I exaggerate only a little in saying there are orders of magnitudes difference in cooking ease from chicken to duck and from duck to goose.

Why aren't we eating more geese?

Maybe the airlines can salvage the ones that fly into jet engine intakes and recycle them directly into airline food. It can't be any worse than the rubber chicken they serve now. And maybe it would qualify as "mechanically separated goose meat" that they could use to produce Pink Goose Slime nuggets. Yum.

The Food Babe Says There’s Beaver Butt in Your Ice Cream

It's ironic that in today's industrial-scale food production, most manufacturers now use synthesized chemical compounds in place of these natural substances that were more commonly used decades and decades ago. Castoreum and Isinglass are downright quaint, and I'd be glad to consume products made with these time-honored natural additives.

The Food Babe Says There’s Beaver Butt in Your Ice Cream

Sensationalist idiot whoever this Food Babe person is.

Feb 19, 2015
LorenzoGA in Food Media & News

Why aren't we eating more geese?

First of all, although geese may be more popular in France than America, it's not like the French are eating goose every day. Also, many of them are raised for foie gras, not meat. And I'm not sure that what's raised in French farmyards of "poor" regions reflects what is raised on an industrial scale in France. But yeah, to an American in France, one does notice what looks to us like a lot of geese. I have a few guesses as to the reasons we North Americans eat far more chicken and turkey than goose:

First, more of us prefer tender, mild-flavored white-meat chicken. The tenderness and absence of strong flavor makes it a blank protein canvas that lends itself to hundreds of different preparations. We even prefer chicken over turkey for that reason. Turkey can be a little tough or dry, and it sure does taste like turkey. Many Americans really don't like turkey. Goose can be even tougher and drier (and paradoxically, also greasier) and more assertively flavored than turkey. When one eats goose, there is no doubt as to what it is.

Second, I am not a farmer but I suspect geese are more difficult to raise than chickens. Maybe even more difficult than turkeys. Geese are waterfowl, like ducks. They need water. They can't be crammed into a poultry house like chickens. Thus, if goose were raised on a large commercial scale, it would be expensive. Are we willing to pay that? The savings in grain that you point out may not offset the cost of requiring more space to raise each bird.

Third, it's a pain in the neck to cook goose. They are big birds with big bones. Sure, if geese were produced on the same scale as chickens, we'd find boneless skinless goose breasts in the supermarket. But we don't presently even find that much turkey in the way of turkey parts in the supermarket. The vast majority of turkey sold in supermarkets is in the form of whole birds sold around the holidays. Cooking a whole goose yields a LOT of fat/grease--it is not an easy thing to deal with. We Americans THINK we like turkey, but I think we like the IDEA of turkey more than we like turkey. Same for goose, I'd guess.