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My uncle says he can't find pork liver

So I just bought my uncle a fantastic charcuterie book and am trying to get him to start using it, but he says he can't find pork liver anywhere. I think this has to be BS. He is in Manhasset, Long Island. Any ideas? I am not from the area so I can't tell him where to go.

Thanks

Dec 22, 2010
squabbit in Outer Boroughs

Advice on preparing traditional cured/smoked/aged ham?

You are quite right. Everything will be saved. After he takes the picnic off I think I will have him cut a large steak off that I can slice into smaller steaks or frying slices. It kind of depends on how much comes off with the picnic, but I don't want to cook too much at once. It requires a bit of calculation because, as you know, the meat is so much more dense than regular ham. I can judge what people will eat with a regular cooked ham, but this is a different animal.

Apr 06, 2010
squabbit in Home Cooking

Advice on preparing traditional cured/smoked/aged ham?

No kidding. It is a beauty. My plan right now is to soak it whole for 24 hours from Thursday evening until Friday evening. On Friday evening I will have my butcher take the picnic ham off and cut the main ham to an appropriate size for a large Sunday dinner with family and friends. I am going to freeze the excess. As far as preparation goes, I may put the thing in water and bring it up to a boil, then remove and bake in a covered dish with a few inches of water until it is done, then remove fat/skin and do a quick glaze bake at the last minute. Does that sound reasonable to you all?

Apr 06, 2010
squabbit in Home Cooking

Advice on preparing traditional cured/smoked/aged ham?

THANKS. I have a butcher who is willing to cut it for me. I was thinking about removing the picnic ham and then maybe having him spiral slice it and tie it for me. If I do these things and then soak it will it ruin the meat? If it is spiral sliced and the picnic is removed, I figure that I might be able to cut back on the soaking time? Any thoughts? Thanks again

Apr 05, 2010
squabbit in Home Cooking

Advice on preparing traditional cured/smoked/aged ham?

So I am the fortunate owner of a 17 pound aged ham prepared in the traditional fashion for long-term aging and stability. I have dubbed it "Hamzilla." It has very very dense, deep burgundy colored meat that is much more akin to prosciutto than any ham you might get at the average grocery store (it has virtually no water content). My questions are as follows. The FDA considers this meat to be uncooked and therefore does not recommend eating it without preparation, but it looks and tastes exactly like prosciutto (but with a little bit of a smokiness). Can I use it as such? Also, the meat is very salty due to the process of creating a shelf-stable product (this thing was made last fall). The manufacturer states that the ham can be soaked over night to remove some of this salt, but considering that the skin covers most of the meat (and it is TOUGH skin) I can't imagine a 24 hour soak is going to do much to remove salt. Any thoughts on how long to soak this thing so that it is edible, without messing up the texture/flavor of the meat? Thanks. Here is a link to the smokehouse with a picture of a similar ham. http://www.smokehouse.com/burgers.nsf...

Apr 05, 2010
squabbit in Home Cooking

Best Indian/Asian Prepared Cooking Sauces?

Swad brand (I know, such an unappetizing name) coriander chutney is absolutely fabulous. Very strong, spicy, bright, fresh,acidic flavor. A must have for samosas and works well for any Indian recipe calling for fresh coriander (I think).

Dec 04, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

What must I eat in Memphis

Thanks for the advice. I have been checking things out and it looks like Gus' and BBQ shop (ribs), Payne's (sandwich) are going to be must-haves. Too bad about the convention, I hope I can still get some food.

What must I eat in Memphis

Heading to Memphis for a quick foodie weekend on Friday. I have been reading various epic BBQ threads online, but thought I would solicit some more up-to-the-minute advice. We are staying on Beale Street, but have a car and will travel for food. I am primarily interested in things that will shorten my lifespan such as fried chicken and ribs. Any advice is appreciated, haven't been to the town before. By the way, not planning on hitting Rendezvous or Corky's as they seem to be consistently panned as expensive tourist traps.

What's your "secret ingredient?"

I save the confit jelly left over after making duck confit and freeze it. I use it whenever a recipe calls for chicken stock. Adds a depth and flavor that can't be beat.

Oct 01, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Can you substitute Asian pears for apples?

Asian pears (or their juice rather) are used as meat tenderizer in some, well, Asian meat dishes. I recently made a great great great Korean braised beef short rib recipe that called for Asian Pear that I found here:http://www.xanga.com/thousandthdish/5...

Sep 25, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Ah, the goose

I'm glad this thread picked up, thanks for the advice everyone. Perhaps D'artagnan is the solution for my source. I have a few people scouring the countryside at the moment just in case though. My goal is to get out as much of the fat as possible (because I don't like to eat it with the skin, but I will certainly be saving it for other purposes).I don't have access to a rotisserie, but I figure if I take the gill slit recommendation (I too have been frustrated by the fork prick method) and couple it with the upright or tilted rack recommendation, and then add my own "low and slow" patience, I should be able to render it without drying it out too much.

Sep 23, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Home cooked, or assembled food/foodie gifts for Christmas, new ideas?

I make home-cured corned beef for family and friends. I usually end up making about five briskets or so every winter, in addition to special order from friends that want to give them as gifts themselves. Fully cooked, they last a long time if wrapped properly and refrigerated. It is actually quite easy, only requires about five minutes to trim the meat, 10 minutes to assemble the cure and rub it on, and two weeks in the fridge with a "food grade" brick on top. After that you are pretty much in business. I basically use Joan Nathan's recipe/process from "Jewish Cooking in America." Very popular homemade gift around here.

Sep 18, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

need a goose in St. Louis

Anybody know where to get a good, naturally-raised goose in the St. Louis area? I checked eatwild.com, but it doesn't seem like anybody closer than Leesburg has a goose for sale. Help. I would really rather not buy from the grocery store or even Whole Foods for this product.

Sep 18, 2008
squabbit in Great Plains

Ah, the goose

I am thinking of switching things up a bit this Thanksgiving and considering roasting a goose. I have never done it before, though I am a frequent roaster/confit-er of duck. Several questions:

1.Does anybody have a great goose recipe? One that gets out a lot of the sub-dermal fat and crisps the skin? For this purpose I am looking for a recipe with its roots in Western Europe/North America.

2. Is goose fat as wonderful as duck fat? Should I make a real effort to conserve it?

3. Any outstanding sources for geese? I am in St. Louis city and will be looking for something local, but if anybody has a great farm they know about............

4. I was thinking of cold-smoking the goose for a bit before roasting. Any thoughts?

/Ready.......go

Sep 18, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Home Canning

I have received different opinions regarding the hazards of botulism and canning, especially when it comes to highly acidic things like pickles. Recently, I skipped the step of the post-can boiling water bath for a batch of pickles. I sterilized the jars and caps thoroughly and immediately poured in the boiling pickle solution. The jars sealed well. Some people have told me that I should throw them out because I skipped the bath. Other people, including a woman who sells homemade pickles at a nearby farmers market says that she never processes her pickles in a water bath because it over cooks them and that as long as I sterilized the jars and caps and have a good seal my pickles should be ok. Finally, my father, who is a 59 year old microbiologist and infectious disease specialist MD says that he has never seen a case of botulism in his career. 1. Should I throw out my pickles? 2. Does anyone have experience with botulism and canning (seems very rare)? Anybody care to weigh in on this?

Sep 10, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

St Charles, Mo ?

St. Charles County has about 30 of the best Applebees in the country.

twice fried method for FF/Pomme Frites

Thanks everyone, good advice. All my waistline needs is a way to make frying easier.

Sep 02, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

twice fried method for FF/Pomme Frites

Does it matter how long I set them aside? Should I just leave them on the counter on a paper towel in between? Does he recommend any other prep?
Thanks Joan

Sep 02, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

twice fried method for FF/Pomme Frites

Can anyone describe the "twice fried" method for making french fries? I make them whenever I serve duck confit (tonight), but they always take so long. I cut the potatoes small, and I get the oil (duck fat, oh yeah) as close to 350 as I can, but it still seems like I am frying forever. (I know, the water content of the potato makes a difference as well, and I try to make good decisions with the limited varieties available to me(.

Sep 02, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

husband's birthday dinner in STL....help!

Sidney Street Cafe is, in my mind, one of the top two restaurants in STL. Eclectic and impeccably prepared menu, plenty of fish, upscale casual environment in old brick building in Benton Park, and best of all the bread they serve before the meal is a very fresh basket of beignets with a slightly sweet herb butter. I would go for the beignets alone. http://www.sidneystreetcafe.com/

STL - Need Recs near Scottrade Center

Next time I would go to Square One Brewery in Lafayette Square. Good food, good beer, good ambiance, and only about a mile and a half from downtown. Straight shot north on Tucker.

4 meals in St. Louis

Chez Leon in the Central West End on Laclede and Euclid. Excellent French Bistro.
Everything is fantastic. The ambiance is upscale, but comfy. The sauces will kill you, and you will die happy. Choucroute Garnie, Duck Confit, and the Hanger Steak Frite (order bernaise to go with) are all my favorite winter dishes there. I could go on but I am starting to drool on my keyboard.

Anyone preserving, canning or putting food up these days?

I made a few jars of pickled cucumbers and jalapeno's the other day. I did not process in a hot water bath after capping the jars. I took the jars and lids directly out of boiling water with sterilized tongs, added the cucumbers and poured in the boiling pickle solution. The jars have sealed, but now I am worrying about not having processed them in the hot bath. 1. should I be worried? 2. can I process them now (a week later?).
Thanks,
/pickling newbie

Aug 22, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Duck Confit question

Thanks for the input, but I am not sure I made myself clear. I am talking about when cooking, not when storing. Can you layer the legs on top of each other when simmering? (Chefathome, I know the feeling, I broke down and started some yesterday. It is much too hot out right now for this nonsense where I live, but what are you going to do? :)

Aug 22, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Fresh Bacon Slab Recipes?

Confit. Rub it in kosher salt (and anything else you want) for two days. Rinse it off and submerge it in melted fat (pork, duck, goose) in an oven-safe pot. Bring the pot to a low simmer and place in the oven at about 190- 200 degrees for about eight hours uncovered. Remove, put in a jar, cover with fat, refrigerate for at least a week (it will keep for months). It will kill you, but man there is nothing so delicious.

Aug 21, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

what to do with dill

If you like dill it is just about the easiest plant I have ever grown. Just throw some seeds in the dirt and they will grow into more dill than you can possibly use. Two of my standard fresh dill uses are in potato pancakes and in pickles (easier than you probably think and it is pickling season).

Aug 21, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Duck Confit question

So, I have been making Duck Confit for several years now and, because it is so time intensive and keeps so well, I would like to make larger batches. However, I am always afraid to put more than about three legs into the (for lack of a better term) fat pot. I can only fit three legs in a single layer. Because of the confit jelly that collects beneath the legs, I have always thought that layering legs one on top of the other in the fat would screw up the process. Anybody want to weigh in on this?

Aug 21, 2008
squabbit in Home Cooking

Need to find apple cider with no preservatives around St. Louis

I live right by Tower Grove, and go to the market all the time. I'll have to talk to the Centennial folks. Thanks very much. As far as the cider goes, I am not a pro. I made a three-gallon batch two years ago that came out unbelievably well (if I do say so myself). It is much easier (IMO) than brewing beer. Last year I found out the hard way that even a tiny amount of preservative makes for abortive cider. Looking forward to getting it right again this year. I am not familiar with stlbites or egullet, but if things go well I could post something. There is not much I know about the process that you couldn't pick up by skimming a home-brew book. With basic cider you essentially dump in extra sugar and yeast and walk away for a month.

Need to find apple cider with no preservatives around St. Louis

Thanks to you both, I'll check them out. Keep the ideas coming, its almost cider season.

Need to find apple cider with no preservatives around St. Louis

What is the Ringhausen facility? Do they have a website? Thanks