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What is your favorite rhubarb recipe?

I have four rhubarb plants that were planted by my father in law at least 25-30 years ago. We bought the house 21 years ago and I usually ignore the rhubarb after making a couple of rhubarb cakes. It produces so much that I have to give it away. I never cared for the sauce that people in Wisconsin usually make--tastes fine but looks awful. However, with all the interest in rhubarb, I have given it a second chance. Made the baked rhubarb compote with ginger and used most of it in rhubarb custard bars. Delicious! Less fussy than a pie, which seems to go with rhubarb's humble character. Made a basic cookie crust with whole wheat flour, baked for 15 minutes, mixed the compote with a custard (eggs, whipping cream, flour, a little yogurt, sugar), baked for 50 minutes. Drained the syrup from the compote before mixing and made myself a bellini. While drinking, reflected on the contradictions of this vegetable. Ignored in the yard yet produces heavily, can make a humble dessert or a fancy cocktail. Have decided that whatever I make with rhubarb, it has to be easy. Harvested some stalks just now and am making a syrup for more bellinis.

May 28, 2009
radfem in Home Cooking

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

And it is my point that to claim that it is possible for food to be politics free is in itself a political statement. So, you are asking everyone else to adopt your politics.
The teabaggers had teabags hanging from their hats, glasses, and other parts of their bodies, and they referenced a historical incident where the politics of food and taxation provided the catalyst for a war. They dumped teabags into bodies of water, or tried to, and sent teabags to the White House. So I do not agree that it is a stretch. Also, most if not all of the teabaggers were Republicans. Finally, if they weren't against Obama, why were there so many anti-Obama signs? It's extremely doubtful, in fact impossible that the teabaggers would have been protesting if the other man was running the country right now. This is a great example of the politics of food is hidden behind an ideological screen.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2...

I agree with you that politics is not what this site is ALL about; rather, it explores various aspects of food culture, including, but certainly not limited to, its political implications and associations. Of course you're not the only one disliking the current administration, but there are also people who are celebrate, like, or feel at least ambivalent about it. Why should the politics of food here only reflect yours?
I'd like to also point out, since you might not have read my last post, that the teabag protests against Obama last week relied heavily on a food commodity to convey their disgust with the administration.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

Tinka, I wish you the best with your garden and again, I appreciate your calling a spade a spade. A garden is at least a forward-looking solution. I intend to plant one as well this year because I am suffering from the economic downturn that resulted from putting all our eggs in one basket called Iraq. It's probably best for you to go and dunk your teabags on a different food site, but I hope you will permit people to put food to political uses other than just the ones you and zendrive sanction.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

Also: I made the rhubarb bars and they were delicious--a little different from the usual rhubarb dessert.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

And thank you, to Tinka82, who is at least up front about the fact that s/he does not like the story because of disagreement with the current administration. If zendrive had done so in the first place, all of us could have saved a lot of time. I took chefsilvia's advice and took a deeper look at another post in which zendrive made clear exactly what kinds of politics s/he would prefer to see. It's fine to disagree with politicians, but please don't hide behind the politics of escapism. If the other guy had won, I'm sure you, tinka, and maybe john would not be complaining about said menu or chow's politics, nor would I. I simply would have made one of the other fine menus on the website. There's probably a recipe somewhere for Shoefly Pie and Baked Alaska.
Having said that, I really don't see why left, right, and center can't mix on this site. I don't care if you don't like the current administration; I did not like the previous one but when I saw that picture of Bush and roast turkey, it didn't make me think I couldn't enjoy Thanksgiving. If overtly political menus stress you out because of your politics, then click on over to the drink recipes and make yourself an "I-can-see-White-Russian" or go ahead and have fun...post an alternative menu--which is what you already did. But please don't ruin it for other people for whom food is more than sublime.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

I'm sorry to have burst some right-wing bubbles, but the fact is that to insist that food is politics-free is in fact to take a political position. Food is political and always has been whether you realize it or not. The abundance of food and leisure time to prepare and enjoy it tends to obliterate the politics of food, which is what happens in this country. But if you lived in a place where food is scarce, believe me, you would realize how political food is. Ideology also prevents seeing the politics of food; for example, when chow publishes 4th of July menus, do any nationalists or patriots complain that it's political? Of course not...to them/us, it's just another celebration. I enjoy chow because it is not afraid to mix the politics of food with the politics of escapism, and many other food publishers have also gone in that direction. Compare the Gourmet magazines of the 1960s-1970s with the Gourmet magazines of the 21st century--they now realize that it's impossible to speak of the sublime food experience without acknowledging its relevance to the world.

Apr 21, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

Zendrivel, no, I'm not a jerk which is why I didn't ask you if you were one for making such a silly, arrogant, unrealistic request. I was merely voicing my support for the political story, and I wasn't talking down to you for making a request. Your problem is not with cashing in on any bandwagon. It's with the idea that politics would invade your politics-free fantasy zone. The idea of food as purely escapist is simply dreamy. Someone had to grow, process, make, and serve your food so that you could escape. Etc.
andytee, the name is radfem not redfem, and with all due respect, this assortment of recipes is exactly what chow should be doing. Michelle Obama's cookie recipe has already been circulated, and frankly, she's not really a cook. So has the White House menu for Holiday XYZ, everywhere. And the Obama family life is also under a microscope; we've heard way too much about their personal lives. I'd much rather read some original recipes that result from a food professional's creative interpretation of an agenda, a history, a voting public, and a little pop culture thrown in.
BTW, some politician's wife shared her recipe when asked, and was accused of stealing it from a copyrighted source. So I'm sure that sharing recipes is on the list of political no-nos.

Apr 20, 2009
radfem in Features

100 Days in the White House: A Garden Menu

I liked this story and am quite surprised that people do not think food is political. We have government agencies that set food policies, regulate food quality, and help to distribute food. We have numerous people employed by food industries. Food is an important cultural artifact and eating is an important social ritual.

Julia Child's career as a chef and cookbook author was a direct result of her job as an operative in the OSS.

Chow.com is great because it engages with all of those things: food as sublime, as ritual, as social, as pop culture, as history, as politics. If you want a politics-free food zone, maybe you should go back to reading cookbooks from the 19th century.

Apr 19, 2009
radfem in Features

Herbed Spätzle

Mmmm...I just made this and it turned out great! Wasn't as easy as I thought it would be, though. I read all the comments and watched the video before I actually boiled them. I think letting the batter rest helped--it was a little stiffer. I don't have a spaetzle maker so I used an old fashioned colander that looks more like a wire basket and put in about a cup and a half at a time. I did not have to push very much with the spatula-- it sort of dripped through on its own with a little help. Keep the water boiling at all times. The reason I made these spaetzle was that my husband did the shopping and bought a cheap rump roast which sat in the fridge for a few days. I thought of brining it and ended up making a sort of sauerbraten and all of the sauce seemed to cry out for something like this. I also made some red cabbage which I just simmered for awhile with some of the sauerbraten cooking liquid. With the combination of spices and sweet sour, it was quite the German repast. And, VERY cheap.

Apr 13, 2009
radfem in Recipes