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Sourdough bread without Iron?

Oh, ok b/c I was going to say that some bakeries use commercial yeast to sourdough bread. Sometimes the wild yeast does not leaven the bread enough, so they add a little booster.

You might have to look for things like the rye you mentioned above and other breads from non-wheat flours. I think rye, millet, those kinds of flours are not enriched with iron. Maybe try a vegan bakery?

Mar 13, 2009
laguera in General Topics

Sourdough bread without Iron?

May I ask why they specified sourdough? Is it because you are also supposed to avoid yeast?

Mar 13, 2009
laguera in General Topics

Steaks ... Do you eat the fat?

My dad used to call that little flap of fat the Pope's nose. Hee hee. (I am sure he got this term from somewhere else, but I'm not sure where.)

Mar 09, 2009
laguera in General Topics

Just how "W" is the GU in Guacamole supposed to sound?

yeah, except i think the initial consonant sound is more like a very soft g that gets caught in the back of your throat than it is like an h. Guacamole and guapo I have never heard pronounced with that slightly aspirated sound that the h implies.

Mar 05, 2009
laguera in Not About Food

Just how "W" is the GU in Guacamole supposed to sound?

Güera! It was my nickname at a restaurant I worked at.

Mar 05, 2009
laguera in Not About Food

Just how "W" is the GU in Guacamole supposed to sound?

it's not regional, there are some basic rules depending on what follows the g.

G before an a plus consonant (ganar), o plus consonant, (golosa) or u plus consonant (gusto) is hard.

G before an e plus consonant (genio) or i plus consonant (girasol) is like an aspirated h.

G before u plus e or i (guerra, guitarra) is hard.

G before u plus a (guacamole) is that kind of soft g or "hwa" sound that some on this thread refer to it as.

G before üe or üi (güera, pengüino) is like an english w.

I probably forgot some diphhthong combos, but those are the basic rules for g pronunciation.

Mar 05, 2009
laguera in Not About Food

restaurant expectations - ingredients, cooking

For $22 you should definitely be getting short grained rice in a risotto dish. And, in my opinion, a homemade stock. Rice and stock is practically the whole dish!

But FWIW, I almost never order risotto in a restaurant unless they say that they cook it to order and it will take 20-30 minutes from the time you order it. If they do not cook it to order, the rice is always par cooked before service and then finished when the table is fired. It is just never the same as when it is made from start to finish in one shot. For one thing, risotto par cooked ahead of time never gets the same amount of stirring than a cooked to order batch does because the line cook prepping it is inevitable prepping 3 or 4 other things at the same time and just can't stand at the stove stirring it for 15 minutes. (I have cooked many a batch of risotto in a restaurant kitchen.)

And when it is par cooked ahead of time, the cook has two opportunities to overcook it: the first time, when he/she yanks it at the par cooking stage, the cook has to be able to gauge how much more the batch will cook as it cools off. Then, when the table is fired as it is being finished it can easily overcook if left a little too long or too much liquid is added initially when it goes into the pan cold.

Sorry for the risotto essay, but I just think it is one of those dishes, for me at least, is almost always bound to disappoint.

Feb 26, 2009
laguera in General Topics

Best Earl Grey (Reposted)

For me the best all time Early Grey was Jackson's of Picadilly. Good tea to begin with and just the right amount of Bergamot without going overboard. Alas, I can't seem to find it anywhere. Maybe they went out of business? The next best thing is Fortnum & Mason. You can order it from their website now. I think it is $20 for a large tin (4oz?) of loose leaf. Expensive, but not more so than teas like Mariage Freres.

Have not tried Intellegentsia. I have been burned too many times by crappy Earl that I rarely try new ones now. Upton's varieties are all sub-par, I think, but I like almost all their other teas.

Anyone tried Devi Tea's Earl Grey?

Feb 20, 2009
laguera in General Topics

What foods should I ask for from Turkey?

Unsulfured Turkish apricots. Somehow the ones I got there are sweeter and more luscious than the ones I have been able to buy here. Also humungous, fat pistachios from Gazantiep. Gulluoglu baklava is really good.

You can get iranian saffron at a really good price which is not available here as far as I know. Also, I found a really good deal on Iranian caviar in one place. Way cheaper than any good caviar I have seen in the US. They gave it to me with an ice pack thing that kept it cold through the flight home. But that is more of a pain to transport.

I did manage to smuggle some pastirma (cured beef covered in paprika and garlic) through customs, but that is your sis's call.

Feb 17, 2009
laguera in General Topics

First home-cooked meal for that special someone.

Or chocolate mousse or a chocolate pots de creme. Very easy to make and you can also make that in advance. Can serve it with the berries & cream too if you want.

May I also say that IMO asparagus is a very spring-like veg to serve with wintry short ribs. I know not a lot is in season right now, depending on where you live, but if you need a green veg, maybe swiss chard or escarole or braised endive OK not green ,but at least lettuce-y)? Also easier to pair with the wine. Asparagus is tricky with wine anyway, and with a big red it might clash.

Feb 06, 2009
laguera in General Topics

First home-cooked meal for that special someone.

Something stewed/braised. Like braised beef short ribs or lamb shanks. Preparing it the day before will give you a chance to make sure the seasoning is correct & tastes perfect. Next day you can skim the fat off the sauce and reheat it and make a vegetable and a salad. The braise will taste better the next day and you won't be freaking out with the prep work before/while she gets there.

Feb 05, 2009
laguera in General Topics

Where to buy venison or wild boar in NJ - moved from General Chowhounding board

The difference in taste has to do with the diet of the animal. I have never had wild boar here but have had it in Argentina. (I have had farm raised boar here though.) Since boars are natural scavengers and omnivores, their diet in the wild is way different than the diet of a farmed boar. (In fact depending on the time of year, the meat can be kind of stinky right after you hunt it!) Venison too. My husband hunts venison in upstate NY, and it tastes quite different than the venison my cousin brings from his hunts in Minnesota. And both are way tastier than farm raised venison. Nothing wrong with farm-raised game, it just does not have the complexity of flavor of the wild stuff I have had.

Jan 30, 2009
laguera in Mid-Atlantic

Where to buy venison or wild boar in NJ - moved from General Chowhounding board

D'Artagnan is good, but none of the products they sell are wild. There is a world of difference between wild & farmed venison and boar.

Jan 30, 2009
laguera in Mid-Atlantic

Bathroom Attendants

Wow. That comparison is way off. Bathroom attendants are employees of the restaurant, not homeless people squatting and asking for tips. Obviously someone in management thought that having attendants would be useful to their business in some way.

Jan 29, 2009
laguera in Not About Food

What to wear for eating out in NY [moved from Manhattan board]

what a cliche that is. not everyone in ny wears black all the time!

Dec 11, 2008
laguera in Not About Food

Seeking cheese retailer to send out holiday packages

Murray's Cheese in New York. They have a fabulous selection of cheeses from all over and have many different gift boxes for different price points. They even have a cheese of the month club!

http://www.murrayscheese.com/PRODUCTS...

Dec 02, 2008
laguera in General Topics

Green papaya source in Queens (for home cooking)?

Where are you in Queens? I have gotten green papaya at Patel Brothers in JH and at the Indonesian market on Broadway in Elmhurst. (Can't remember the name of it, it is not far from Elmhurst Hospital.)

Oct 13, 2008
laguera in Outer Boroughs

100% grass fed beef. Icky! Am I crazy?

I agree that grass-fed beef, when aged properly, is superior to corn-fed, but I will say that not all Argentines think our beef tastes bad. I am married to an Argentine, and we have family and friends come to visit all the time. Almost all the Argentines (and various other South Americans) I have cooked for remark on how delicious the beef is. I am not going to get into the politics of it, but a lot of people, not just Americans, like the taste of corn-fed beef.

Oct 08, 2008
laguera in General Topics

Chao Thai

Chao Thai is very good for some things (pad prikh king, for one), but Sri's curries beat Chao Thai's hands down. Sri still has best curries I have had outside of BKK.

Sep 15, 2008
laguera in Outer Boroughs

Favorite Vendors at Union Square Farmer's Market

OK I have been going to the USQ market for like 15 years, so I have a lotta favorites. These are all Saturday vendors, as I am not able to go very often during the week anymore.

Violet Hill: eggs, lamb, sometimes mutton, pork, bacon, guinea hen, belle rouge chickens, sausage
Rick Bishop (potato guy mentioned by MMR): potatoes, shell beans like favas & cranberries. he should have fresh flageolets now, which are killer. ramps in the spring, crosnes later in autumn. tristar strawberries
Windfall farms: all greens, excellent squash blossoms, edible flowers, baby pea shoots, excellent spinach in spring and fall.
Jim Grillo (tiny stand next to Violet Hill on Saturday mornings only): rabbit, sometimes wild boar, quail eggs, duck eggs, all kinds of Italian heirloom vegetables, like various chicories, cardoons, swiss chard. He also has EXCELLENT tomatoes, but they have not appeared yet. sometimes he brings in wild mushrooms too.
Goat lady (don't know her name???): Fresh kid meat, goat yogurt, some of the cheeses
Eckerton Hill: Heirloom tomatoes, best selection of fresh chilies. awesome, spicy radishes in the spring
Gorzynski Farm: All greens, especially unusual things like fava bean leaves. Great mustard greens and lettuces. Also great radishes.
Paffenroth: Various beets, French breakfast radishes, onions. Their potatoes are good, but not as good as Rick bishop's. Same goes for greens, their kale and stuff is not quite as tasty as some of the other vendors. But the prices are always great and they are really nice people. In the fall they have a great selection of squashes and root vegetables.They also have a bunch of unusual vegetables like nettles, burdock root, kohlrabi.
Our Daily Bread for bread if I don't bake my own.
Franca (don't remember the name of her farm, she is down at the end now, but on the steps, near Keith) for tristar strawberries, haricots verts (best in the market) and shell beans
Keith's organic: best garlic in the market, best shallots. all his greens are very, very good. excellent potatoes.
Norwich organic: best eggplant in the market, also best cukes. nice melon. she had some charentais melon last week. pretty good tomatoes too. they have fava beans in the spring also. nice carrots. she had some crazy good black raspberries a few weeks ago.
Cato Corner: cow milk cheese
There is a dairy on the west side of the market that sells very tasty sheep milk cheeses. (no meats)
In the fall there is a vendor who sells very good grapes, like 8 different varieties.
Blew Family Farm: good selection of chilies, pretty good tomatoes. they have had some good peaches. Lots of squash in the fall.
Locust Grove: good apples in the fall (like 20 varieties), quinces, often they have good cherries
Terhune: usually good peaches, but I have been disappointed this summer. in the spring they have a little bit of asparagus which is insanely good and insanely expensive.

IMO most of the baked goods like pastries and pies are crap. Some of the vendors who sell that stuff use some sketchy ingredients.

Aug 18, 2008
laguera in Manhattan

Argentine or S. American Market in Astoria or LIC

Alfajores Havannas? They sell them at El Gauchito (Argentine butcher/ restaurant) on Corona. They are EXPENSIVE, like $20 per box. The C-Town supermarket across the street also has other brands of alfajores, but I don't think they have Havannas.

Aug 15, 2008
laguera in Outer Boroughs

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

Violet Hill. They are expensive, like $8 per dozen, but they are really good. Windfall farms' are good too, but they are $7/half-dozen. I think all their eggs are from Aracuna hens (blue/green shells).

Aug 13, 2008
laguera in General Topics

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

That is Knoll crest. Their chickens are not pastured. There are other vendors that have far superior eggs.

Aug 12, 2008
laguera in General Topics

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

Violet Hill's are the best! Windfall has good eggs too but they are $7/half dozen!!!

Aug 12, 2008
laguera in General Topics

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

MN, do you ever get to the Union Square greenmarket? Not all the egg vendors are great, but there are a couple farms that have superior eggs.

Aug 12, 2008
laguera in General Topics

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

Greedygirl is right, the superior flavor of pastured chicken comes partly from getting to run around, and partly because they come to weight more slowly so are slaughtered later. Some of the flavor differences are in the breed too. Commercial chickens have been bred primarily to put on weight quickly. Broilers are slaughtered at 6 weeks in a commercial operation! Flavor is a secondary concern.

But a lot of the flavor comes from the diet. Pastured chickens eat a much more heterogeneous diet than factory raised chickens. They will eat whatever they can forage and whatever scraps you throw at them: vegetables, fruits, spoilt milk, etc. The difference is most visible in the egg yolks: pastured eggs usually have bright orange yolks, whereas eggs from battery hens are pale yellow. It is real hard to eat grocery store eggs after having the real thing.

Aug 12, 2008
laguera in General Topics

How many people buy supermarket chicken and meat?

Chickens are not vegetarian! They eat bugs, worms, rodents, pretty much anything they can get at! If you buy a chicken that was purportedly raised on a vegetarian diet, you can be pretty sure it was not a free-running bird. Chickens were not "born to eat" pelletized corn and soy. Furthermore, rampant infections in commercially raised chickens is due more to overcrowded conditions that promote the spread of disease than the feed itself. Chickens have no inherent problems with digesting commercial feed. I think you are conflating the issue of ruminants being raised on a primarily corn and soy based diet (which can cause g.i. illness) with the general issue of poor animal husbandry, which includes chicken, pork, and beef production.

Aug 11, 2008
laguera in General Topics

100% grass fed beef. Icky! Am I crazy?

Millions of Argentines would disagree with that statement.

Jul 21, 2008
laguera in General Topics

The Meat We Eat

That's what I thought, but couldn't be sure! But seriously, all the Argentine in-laws are totally protein crazy really do eat 8-10 oz per day, more for younger guys. The rule of thumb at an Argentine asado, if you should ever host one, is a half-kilo of assorted meats per person!!

Jun 03, 2008
laguera in General Topics

The Meat We Eat

No, not everyone does, that's why I was asking. (No snark intended, BTW.) I grew up in a midwestern family that ate meat every single day. And my dad was in the meat business.

I am still an omnivore and am lucky to have a few farmer friends to provide me with top-quality meat, but I try to limit my portions of protein to 4-5 oz. per day. I never eat meat/fish for breakfast and almost never for lunch. Since I am married to an Argentine, it is VERY difficult to go for days with no meat or seafood, but I try to get a day or two per week with a veg dinner (might include eggs though). But then there are splurge days when we throw a barbecue or even roast a whole pig or lamb and the consumption goes up a little b/c of the leftovers.

My bother and his wife, OTOH, probably eat a pound of meat or fish between the two of them per week. They are super-abstemious not for moral or health reasons, but my bro just cooks w/ a lot of grains and veg. I think it is also a reaction to our super meat-crazy upbringing.

Jun 03, 2008
laguera in General Topics