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General question about making reservations

In London, I have found that many places take reservations only for tables above a certain number. Usually when it's for a table of less than 4 PAX, the restaurants tell us they do not take reservations so we just show up early and hope for the best. When it's just me and my husband, we can usually snag a table or grab two seats at the bar. I prefer sitting at the bar and talking food with the bartender/servers; I learn more about the restaurant that way. As stated by others, many of the 'hip, new joints don't do any reservations at all but they are packed from early evening until late. If you have no time restrictions, it's well worth it to get to those places early, have a cocktail or drink and then enjoy a full evening of culinary treats.

Aug 25, 2014
lecker in U.K./Ireland

Several Days in Istanbul and the Princes' Islands - Report

Hi Dave,
thanks for the wonderful and mouth-watering trip report. Your report entices me to go back to Istanbul. It's such a fabulous city with amazing food options, mostly in small mom and pop shops. You seem to have captured so much of that. Thanks again for sharing. I will use this on my next trip there.

Aug 25, 2014
lecker in Europe

London dining help sought, please.

London has such a wide variety of restaurants, you will love it. As a soon-to-be expat in London, I have travelled to London about 3 or 4 per month over the past 5 months. All all the places I have tried, these are the ones that I go back to and why:

Salt Yard-Their small portions are perfect for sharing. I like the small, intimate space. I would do this place for both lunch or dinner. For dinner you probably need to book. This restaurant is located on a quieter street than Oxford so, if you do shop on Oxford but want to escape the craziness, head over to Salt Yard, start off with one of their speciality cocktails and then enjoy many of their bite sized creations.

Ducksoup- in Soho. Their food, service and unique wine selection are surprisingly great. Because of their location in Soho, it's an easy walk to Trafalgar Sq and the theaters. I like the pint-sized intimacy of the place and the unique dishes they present. You should probably reserve for dinner.

Mildred's in Soho. I visit this vegetarian cafe for lunch several times during each of my trips. Your cousin will have lots of vegetarian options but so will the rest of your family. Their halloui burger is a fav as is their detox salad. Their food is freshly prepared and this restaurant is the best of all the other vegetarian places I have tried in Soho.

Nopi in Soho. I wasn't too impressed with Nopi. I gave it a try because so many people raved about it. But I thought the food was average at best and the service hurried and very rush, rush, rush. There was no charm, no uniqueness, and nothing original.

Polpetto in Soho. It reminds me of a grungier Ducksoup. I prefer Ducksoup to Polpetto. But this place is very packed in the evenings.

Bone Daddies. You didn't mention Japanese but there are several Japanese ramen shops in Soho. This is my favorite thus far for their addictive broth, chewy noodles, and their fun, chaotic atmosphere. Expect long lines out the door, but it moves relatively fast.

Dishoom in Shoreditch. It's Indian food modernized with eye-catching cocktails. I've only been to the one in Shoreditch and the long wait in the evening was sobering. But their food was solid and tasty. I would probably go back with friends who enjoyed drinking cocktails and eating Indian food. But there are so many great Indian restaurants in London, it's easy to explore some others too.

Lima, not far from Salt Yard and Oxford's shopping madness. I LOVE this Peruvian restaurant. Whenever I go there, I am always surprised by the food and learn something new about a South American grain or ingredient that I have never had before. Lovely place. Reservations recommended for dinner.

Story in Shad Thames, just at the southern end of Tower Bridge. For a special occasion or just for a different lunch experience, I would recommend this restaurant. I will be going back next month. To really enjoy it, you need to have nothing else to do afterward your meal. You need the time to enjoy every single course they bring you; so don't be in a hurry.

Have fun on your trip!

Aug 20, 2014
lecker in U.K./Ireland

Western Germany (Mosel & Rheingau) wine & food touring info

Because I am not too familiar with that area of Germany, I don't have any recommendations. Sorry. However, Luxembourg is not too far from Baerenthal (2-hr drive), which does have an amazing restaurant/hotel run by Jean-George Klein. I ate there many years ago and their food is impressive. It is a destination in itself for many foodies. Here is their website. http://www.arnsbourg.com

Between Luxembourg and Baerenthal, lies Bitche, which has an interesting Citadel and a beautiful 360 degree of the surrounding landscape. In Bitche, there is Le Strasbourg, which is supposed to have amazing food. The last time we were in Bitche, we didn't have reservations and were unable to get a table. The next time we head there, we will try it out.

From Baerenthal, it is only a few hours drive to the Moselle or Rhein area, depending on which you prefer. I have eaten at many places along the Rhein, but I found that most were rather tourist and not worth the drive for food/wine. For food/wine experience, I prefer to drive a bit further to the Alsace region or across the border to France.

If you do visit the Moselle or Rhein area during your trip, I would love to hear what gems you find.

Another suggestion may be to pick one of your favorite vineyards from either area and see if you can arrange a wine tour. That might be interesting for your group.

Hope this helps. Have a good trip.

Mar 17, 2014
lecker in Europe

Back to London after 10 years away. Where must I eat?

Hi blindlemonjefferson: Where did you end up eating and how did you like it?

Londonlinda, zuriga1, phild, withnail42: Thanks for the clarifications and suggestions. Nopi, Medlar, Anchor & Hope and Salt Yard are top on my list now.

Feb 23, 2014
lecker in U.K./Ireland

Back to London after 10 years away. Where must I eat?

mjgauer: Have you done Medlar's Sat or Sun prix fixe? If so, which would be a good intro to Medlar? Also, would you suggest making reservations or can we just show up?

Also, from your lengthy list above, I noticed that you describe some as pubs and some are bistros. I am a little confused. Because I am originally from the U.S., a pub for me is a drinking establishment, where the food is not the focus at all. I usually go to a pub to drink, after I had eaten somewhere else. I think of a bistro more as a quaint restaurant with simple menu and food. What is the UK term for a restaurant that is small, open kitchen perhaps, with a small menu that changes daily depending on the seasonable and fresh ingredients available? I want to experience something like that in London. Is there such a restaurant like that you would recommend?

Thanks in advance for your insight.

Feb 21, 2014
lecker in U.K./Ireland

Back to London after 10 years away. Where must I eat?

Hi Londonlinda: What do you like about Nopi? I am heading to London next weekend and have been curious to try one of the Ottolenghi places. I have been drooling over their cookbooks and am curious to know if the food there is as good as the styling in the books. Thanks for anything you can share.

Feb 21, 2014
lecker in U.K./Ireland

Rotterdam Restaurants - Spirit, Oliva,

Couple weeks ago, in planning for an unexpected, quick (2-night) trip to Rotterdam, I was a bit disheartened with the lack of Rotterdam restaurant recommendations on this board. Michelin was always easy to find, but it's more challenging to find good food that isn't on the radar. However, it wasn't as bad as I had feared. I had no plans so we just discovered the different neighborhoods, hoping that something would catch our eye.

After walking around the harbor area, which led us to the Iconic Cube houses, we walked around the Pannekoekstraat (Pancake Street) area (love the name) and stumbled into Spirit, on Mariniersweg 9. It looked like a cute cafe where we could grab a quick bite to eat before continuing on our walking tour of the city. The cafe is cafeteria style. After grabbing a plate and reviewing the items on offer, we realized that it's an organic, vegetarian cafe. My husband is not a vegetarian by any stretch of the imagination, but he was attracted by the fresh, vibrant colors of the food and the diverse options available. Having developed a taste for Tempeh in Indonesia, he went first for the stir-fried tempeh, and continued to pile his plate with other interesting and savory dishes. I opted for mostly the warm dishes like Quinoa, roasted vegetables, tofu, Bulgar, etc. They had a selection of soups and various salad items, but I declined on those because they looked so common. I was intrigued more by the warm dishes that the chefs were busy cooking and bringing out to the buffet stand. After we filled our plates, we took them to the drink counter where the plates were weighed, drinks offered and then, after paying, we took a bar seat near the middle of the room. The food was surprisingly very tasty, fresh, and satisfying. The cafe was packed around 13:00, which is when we entered, and it continued to fill up as we ate. I noticed some diners with ipads and laptops so I pulled out my iphone and noticed that they had free wi-fi. I was able to refresh my email.

I would recommend Spirit for a healthy, delicious lunch, especially if you are short on time, do not have time to linger in a restaurant, or dining solo before heading off to see the sights. Actually, they had some decadent looking dessert that I would have ordered if I hadn't gotten full on Quinoa (Quinoa is surprisingly very very filling). The atmosphere reminded me a bit of Whole Foods, but with fresher and tastier food. I love grocery shopping at Whole Foods, but their prepared meals are always disappointing. Would I go back to Spirit for lunch if I return to Rotterdam? Yes, especially if I was planning a big dinner at a Michelin restaurant. The cafe is also attached to a cool home-furnishings shop next door, a new-age book shop upstairs and what looked like a grocery store (probably organic) on the other side.
http://www.spiritrotterdam.nl/

We met some friends at Dudok for afternoon cafe. It's a big two-level space that seems to be packed in the afternoons with families, couples and friends. It's very loud on the first floor but a bit more quiet on the second floor. Although we intended to only have coffee, we ended up ordering a tea tray of savory treats including sandwiches, spreads, dips, etc, and some small bowls of soup. The food wasn't memorable or anything that I would return to again. Although it is located in a hip shopping area, I found the atmosphere of the cafe (and people watching) more interesting than the food. Enough said. Would I go back? Probably not.
http://www.dudok.nl/

For our last night we wanted seafood, but the place we wanted to try (Schmitt Zeevis) wasn't open for dinner so we went with a recommendation from our concierge. She suggested Oliva on Witte de Withstraat, which is a funky/artsy street with cute shops, restaurants, galleries that we had walked earlier in the day. It was a short walk (about 15 min) from our hotel. Everything in Rotterdam seems within walking distance. As we walked into the restaurant, I immediately like the atmosphere. With an open-kitchen, it reminded me of places I have visited in Portland, Tokyo, San Francisco, NYC, London, etc. Very modern, hip and fresh. I'm not sure how to describe it, but from the warm welcome we received to the consistent care of the staff, Oliva felt like a neighborhood restaurant in a hip, happening city. The menu was another plus for me. I love eating in places where the menu is small, intimate and changes each day to reflect what is freshly available and in season. Olivas' menu does exactly that. And their food was delicious. We were a party of three and each of us had a starter, a main and dessert: Braised artichokes, pumpkin risotto, carpaccio, etc.. (Unfortunately I didn't take any photos or notes so I can't remember all that we ate). I think I eat out too often and that is why I can't remember what I ate yesterday! We drank Champagne and then enjoyed a bottle of delicious red wine. I would definitely go back to Oliva if I had a chance to travel to Rotterdam again: Great food, great service, wonderful atmosphere, and very affordable. If we lived in Rotterdam, Oliva would easily become one of our regular restaurants.
http://www.gustoliva.nl/

Feb 20, 2014
lecker in Europe

Planning Portland/Willamette Valley Trip

Congratulations! Portland is foodie, wine and micro-brew heaven, among other things. As others have started, there are so many options, all depending on what you prefer and what your style is. A good reference is the local weekly paper called the Willamette Weekly, or the 'willy week' as I referred to it many years ago when I lived there. It does a wonderful job of reviewing, rating, etc. restaurants, coffee shops, breweries, etc.

http://www.wweek.com/portland/

Four days isn't enough to see all that PDX has to offer, especially in the food/wine/brewery. But I think you're off to a great start. If you can't make it to all your top picks, you can always plan another trip. Have a wonderful trip!

Admittedly, I am SO envious; Portland is one of my favorite places to visit, which I have done at least once a year, but this year I won't have a chance to go back because it's now almost on the other side of the world from me.

Feb 20, 2014
lecker in Metro Portland

Wildwood Closing- what a shock!

Wow! What a blast from the past. I enjoyed them immensely when I was living in PDX back in the '90's. Now, each year I return there seems to be so many new and interesting restaurants on every corner. I just love Portland's food scene.

Do you know why they are closing?

Feb 20, 2014
lecker in Metro Portland

Solo wine trip to Alsace or Burgundy? Miserable or worth trying? Suggestions?

lobsterkiller: Bear in mind that there is no direct train from Strasbourg to Wiesbaden. You have to make 2 or more changes and then connect through Frankfurt or Mainz or Offenbach. I find changing trains so often, especially within a 3-hour window a pain...but if you don't mind, it's doable.

I spent last weekend in Oestrich-Winkel on the Rhein and took the local train from there to Wiesbaden (takes about 25 min). Oestrich-Winkel is a tiny place. We ate couple meals at the restaurant in the Rathaus, very close to our B&B. The food was surprisingly good and very convenient for us. Of course, Wiesbaden or Mainz has bigger and more diverse food options but in the evenings we wanted something local and close to our B&B.

Once you are on the Rhein, the local trains run at the most, every 20 minutes or at the worst, every hour. The buses are more frequent, but slower. The Rhein has plenty of wineyards offering German Rieslings, but most of the food offerings are rich German food. Not sure what you would consider 'worthwhile destination' so you may want to check out the various little towns along the Rhein.
There's plenty of destroyed, castles, cute towns, vineyards galore, etc...

Jan 27, 2014
lecker in France
1

Solo wine trip to Alsace or Burgundy? Miserable or worth trying? Suggestions?

Mangeur: Happy to help. Hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

Jan 26, 2014
lecker in France

Two weeks in Benelux

Hi Willem:

Thanks for your exhaustive list of recommendations for Maastricht. We were thinking of a weekend stop over in Antwerp, but after reading your tips, we're thinking of spending it in Maastricht instead. Because this post is almost 3 years old, I wonder if they are still valid or if you have updated food recommendations for Maastricht.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Jan 26, 2014
lecker in Europe

Five days with an architect...where to eat?

It must have been pre-Ducasse, 2000 or 2001. My disappointment may have been heightened by the fact that it was sold to me as the 'best' restaurant in Paris at the time. I have since learned to manage my expectations when someone says that. Maybe with Ducasse, it has gotten better; I would hope so.

Over the years I have come to realize that most restaurants located in iconic places (or at the top of a TV tower, or the top of the highest hotel in the world, the highest skyscraper, etc) attract enough tourists and others that they do not necessary focus their attention on food and service. But if checking off the Eiffel Tower and a meal in it at Jules Verne is what hychka's friends prefer, then they may enjoy it. Given that Paris is full of amazing architecture, art and history, I think hychka's friends will be in heaven. I would also seek out some buildings that Le Corbusier, Renzo Piano or other iconic architects designed and built in the city.

If I were going to Paris to visit friends (sadly, my friends no longer live there), I would want them to take me to little restaurants, off the beaten track, that combine great food, service and have interesting architectural/art references. I am always amazed when I find a little cafe or restaurant housed in a building that is older than the U.S! That, in and of itself, thrills me. I marvel at the history, the people who must have visited that space before me, what the walls would tell me about the past occupants, if they could talk, etc. And when the meal is amazing, I am in heaven. So many of the places mentioned in this discussion above seem to fit that bill, but I just wouldn't include Jules Verne in that selection. Obviously, I am bias because of the meal I had there way back when. Certainly, Ducasse must have improved Jules Verne from when I was there, but Ducasse can be had almost ALL over the world. It's almost like an institution, isn't it? Wouldn't it be more exciting to try a restaurant or cafe by a chef who is only in Paris? My mouth waters when I think about all the talented chefs in Paris, without the obvious publicity of Michelin or the NYTimes, etc..., following their passion in creating and delivering mouth-watering food for all their patrons...Why don't I live in Paris? Anyways, before I digress further, just my two-cents, for what it's worth.

John: My memory of Jules Verne is that it wasn't that big? How did 200 people fit into the restaurant when you dined? Was there another part that I didn't see?

Jan 26, 2014
lecker in France

Five days with an architect...where to eat?

Having had a mediocre meal at Jules Verne many many years ago, I wouldn't recommend it. I felt very disappointed by the lackluster meal and the cheesy 'tourist' atmosphere. The service was also nothing to write home about.

Le George on Centre Pompidou would be ideal for an afternoon break. the iconic building is known to all architects, but to experience it in person is another wonder. Wow! You could also combine it with a visit to an exhibit there.

Jan 25, 2014
lecker in France

Looking for a dining partner?

It's not crazy. It's a great idea. I wish I had thought to do this when I traveled alone in the past. Well, that was before the internet so I don't know how I would have found another willing dining companion. Good luck with your search!

Jan 25, 2014
lecker in Italy

Solo wine trip to Alsace or Burgundy? Miserable or worth trying? Suggestions?

Mangeur: Our hosts were Phillippe and Anne-Marie and their son (I'm having a senior moment remembering his name, but he had just returned from working in London and he was also quite knowledgeable about wines) at Les Jardins de Lois. http://www.jardinsdelois.com/ It's a charming B&B and, when we return to Beaune, we plan to stay there again. They have parking and they are just a stone's throw and a brief walk from the action in Beaune.

Not all b&b owners can recommend good restaurants and wineries, but Phillippe and Anne-Marie were very well informed and generous in answering all our inquires and questions and in sharing their knowledge. Anne-Marie turned us onto Isabelle et Sylvain Olivier's delicious cassis. http://www.fruirouge.fr/

Sadly, Ferme Fruirouge was closed (Tues/Weds) when we planned to drive to Nuits St. Georges so we couldn't visit the shop. It's probably a good thing because our car was overloaded with cases of wine, sausages, and other French delicacies. However, as if by serendipity, after we purchased some wine from a producer in Meursault, she presented us with couple bottles of cassis and preserves from Ferme Fruirouge. She was also a fan of theirs. Definitely, when we go back to Beaune, we will plan our visit so that we can finally visit Ferme Fruirouge.

That's another thing I would recommend before your trip, Lobsterkiller: check the days when places are closed. We found that some of the places we wanted to visit were closed on the day that we happened to have free. Disappointing, but it made us determined to plan another trip back.

Jan 25, 2014
lecker in France

Good places for pre-theater dinner near Lincoln Center on a Sat night?

I second McGrumpy's Lincoln: wonderful food and impeccable service. As Kathryn stated, a reservation is a must, especially pre-theater time.

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in Manhattan

Dining in beautiful Brittany (and a few quick notes about Paris) in September 2013

Dear Jake: Thank you for sharing your mouth-watering write up. I have been thinking about driving to Brittany for a short trip. After reading your report, I am more energized to start planning my trip and making it longer. Thanks again!

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in France

Dress code

Emu48: I love your sound and wise advice.

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in France

Solo wine trip to Alsace or Burgundy? Miserable or worth trying? Suggestions?

My husband and I drove through Alsace and Burgundy last November. Having a car was vital for all the cases of wine we purchased.

If I were doing it by myself, I would probably take the train to Dijon or Beaune and use either for a base. I would check into a nice B&B and allocate three days exploring those towns. If I also wanted to get to the wineyards, I would either single out the wineyards I wanted to visit outside of town and work with the folks at my B&B for options for access. I wouldn't be surprised if some B&B owners, depending on the time of year, will offer to drive you there themselves or can recommend someone who could arrange a half-day or full-day tour of wineries, etc. B&B owners in France are amazingly generous and very knowledgeable. Our B&B owner was also a winemaker so he seemed to know many of the smaller vineyards in the area that we wanted to visit, he was full of information that we would not have received so graciously had we stayed in a hotel. I find that a lot of staff in hotels are hired help and do not always know about the area that you're in; B&B owners are quite the opposite. Also, if you are alone, using a guide may help you join another solo traveler or meet others who are also interested in touring wineyards. This all depends on whether you prefer to be alone or with others. With only 3 days, I would stick to one location, and not both. We spent three days in Beaun and it wasn't enough for us. I'm anxious to go back for a week to thoroughly experience more. Don't worry. You can't be miserable in France, even if you are alone; the food and wine are amazing and the French are so friendly and helpful. Have a great trip!

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in France

Frankfurt

Yelp, I read the same article with a bit of shock. NYT also included Frankfurt in their 'places to visit in 2014' last week: another shocker for those of us who live here. We're not snobs or anything but when we think of places we want to visit, Frankfurt doesn't necessarily rise to the top as do other more exotic locations. Maybe it's because we've always thought of Frankfurt as just a finance and transit hub, neither of which are 'glamorous'. I'm glad it's getting recognized, but there are so many other worthy places that don't get the plug, which I guess is good; I can still enjoy those places without the populous swarms.

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in Europe

Amsterdam - Dining Alone

Ditto what ThomasvanDale commented below: if you do a search on Amsterdam on this board, you will find plenty of recommendations to help your search and fine tune what you mean by 'fun/authentic'. That means different things to different people. Some people may consider McDonald's to be fun/authentic food experience, but others may find that not to be the case. Maybe if you describe what "authentic" food experience you are seeking, it may help others to provide you a definitive answer.

Because Amsterdam is such a cosmo. city with an eclectic mix of different cultures, 'authentic' depends on what you want to experience specifically. My Amsterdam friends took me to Indian, Thai and Indonesian - all considered authentic and frequented by those nationalities in Amsterdam. However, I would be lying if I said that the food was as good as what I have had in those respective countries. But then the experience of eating in a restaurant is more than just the food, it's also the ambiance, the service, etc.

I don't remember being impressed with cheese shops in Amsterdam. Most of the cheese shops around the city seem to sell large wheels of gouda, not my favorite in terms of cheese. But if you are a fan of gouda, you may love it. For me, the cheese selection sold in the various supermarkets did not impress me like the shops in France or Italy.

Another good source that I found during my recent trip to Amsterdam is http://www.dutchgrub.com/ If you peruse her site, you may stumble upon a restaurant review that fits your criteria. Good luck!

Jan 19, 2014
lecker in Europe

21 Blvd In Beaune - Nice wine bar and restaurant

Mangeur: You must have had that before. Yes, that's what our waiter explained to us and, because I hadn't had it before, I had to try it. I always want to experience new things and whenever a waiter suggests something as 'from the region,' he needs to say no more because I will say, "Oui, merci." Gosh, all this talk of Beaune makes me want to go back 'tout de suite". I wonder if I could convince the husband for a long weekend trip...

Jan 12, 2014
lecker in France

21 Blvd In Beaune - Nice wine bar and restaurant

Mike: Because their wine tome is so extensive, I think the local wines are better priced for movement than wines from outside the Beaune area. I think this is true everywhere and was also evident in Beaune. There are SO many vineyards and wine producers around Beaune to choose from; I would be shocked if a diner could not find a wine on their list that fit their tastes and budget. We wanted to try only wines from that region that we were not familiar with; so we opted for Morey St. Denis Premier Cru from Chaffots vineyards of Domaine Michel Magnien. It was delicious and very very reasonably priced. It was around the 30Euros, I think. Our choice was not the cheapest on the menu and not the most expensive - they had some wines over 1,000 Euros/bottle. Sadly, I am not a wine connoisseur so I doubt that I could tell the difference between a 30Euro or a 1,000 Euro wine, and I don't have the disposal income to support this. But if you can, then, by all means, 21 Blvd probably has it on their wine list. Hope this helps.

Jan 12, 2014
lecker in France

Which State(s) do you enjoy eating in outside of the Midwest?

Portland, OR
Portland, ME
San Francisco, CA
Kansas City, MI
Honolulu, HI
Washington, DC

Jan 04, 2014
lecker in General Topics

Umbria Tuscany Trip Report Late Fall 2013

You accomplished a lot in one week. Great, detailed report. Your report reminds me that I need to find my notes from my last trip to Italy and post it. Thank you!

Jan 03, 2014
lecker in Italy

What's the size and cost of a loaf of white or wheat (brown) bread in parts of Europe?

Good to know that I wasn't depriving myself unnecessarily.:-) thanks for reminding me never to venture down that aisle.

Jan 03, 2014
lecker in Europe

The death of the "American section;" Long live the Asian section.

Yes, sunshine842, it is sad.
Indianriverfl: I think you were successful: I heard and saw a lot of those families at the Frankfurt Xmas market this year spending their money on wurst, gluwein and pomme frites.
John: which base were you on? When I was living in Japan, I enjoyed shopping at the Japanese markets for everything, especially their fresh Japanese milk. 4.5% was my preferred - so delicious and usually from an organic farm nearby or from Hokkaido. My friends bought only US milk, usually skim milk (yuck!), pasteurized and shipped from the US and blessed by USDA. I remember seeing signs at the commissary that warned folks from buying milk off base because it was not USDA approved and could harm you. I think it is sad that the American mainstream has turned away from whole foods to detrimental effect and, with the global ubiquity of McDonald's and other harmful US exports, other country's children will start looking like american kids - overweight, on meds, and unable to do basic math.

Jan 03, 2014
lecker in France

The death of the "American section;" Long live the Asian section.

I read somewhere that the US military personnel make up less than 1 % of the US population. Many of them still don't have passports because when they are posted overseas they can use just their ID cards and orders to enter a foreign country. And because their demographics do not mirror the wide diversity in the US or the world, they, generally, tend to live and exist in their safe base environment. most Americans don't have passports and seem not to understand the addiction of travel and good food. For most military, the idea of travel is a group tour from their home base to another base. But there are those few who do go off the beaten track to travel independently in the search for great food and new adventures. The US military salary is not low, considering...and they seem to have more free time than some would imagine.

Jan 03, 2014
lecker in France