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Wonton Noodle House, Edmonds

Equinoise, when you mentioned chemically smell taste in a stir-fried beef dish, I was thinking it may be baking soda? Chinese cooks often use baking soda and cornstarch to tenderize/silken meat. They sometimes use this mixture on shrimp to make the texture bouncy. I tried a stir fried beef recipe once that used both and the results taste chemically to me. So now, I used the baking soda sparingly first and then rinse the meat or shrimp before proceeding with the recipes.

Jan 08, 2013
mchutch in Greater Seattle

anchovy stock

At HT Market they are in the dried seafood area strangely in the middle of the freezer area down the center shelf. I don't know why they keep it there. Tofu soup sounds delicious anyway. I have substituted shrimp paste to make the stock when I make soon du bu.

Jan 04, 2013
mchutch in Greater Seattle

Anyone been to Shanik yet?

We are going tomorrow night for my daughter's birthday. She made the request. We have also been to Vij's Rangoli. Will report back.

Jan 04, 2013
mchutch in Greater Seattle

anchovy stock

Have you tried H Mart up near Alderwood Mall?

If in a pinch, somewhere closer is HT Market on Aurora Ave.
They have only dried small ones but they work if you put 7 to 10 of them in a tea strainer to make the stock.

There is a Korean Market on University Ave. too but I have never been.

Jan 03, 2013
mchutch in Greater Seattle

What's for Dinner? #155 - Dog Days of Summer II Edition [OLD]

Here in Seattle, it's warm but still cloudy and strangely for here slightly humid. Anyway, because of the weather with the slight spritz of rain instead of grilling I opted make a beef and oyster sauce stir fry and a stir fry of the first of the snow peas from the garden. You can see pics on my Castii as well as other things people are making. https://castii.com/c#cast/561

Jul 18, 2012
mchutch in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #150 [old]

@Breadcrumbs and @mariacarmen, Thank you for your kind words. I think it's the app on my phone that helps...or at least makes it easier to document things.

Jun 17, 2012
mchutch in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #150 [old]

Looks delicious. =)

Jun 16, 2012
mchutch in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #150 [old]

heh, heh. Yes, the parade does start with the naked bicyclists (most are wearing body paint and strategically places props) but believe me you really don't want to see pictures of them. Think some old hippies, some flabby, pasty people (we don't get that much sun here) and you get the picture. And besides all I can think is OUCH! if riding a bike naked especially if you are a guy. I know, I know TMIF. ;-)

Jun 16, 2012
mchutch in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #150 [old]

I'm also in the Seattle Area. Just came back from the Fremont Solstice parade. The weather is strangely muggy for Seattle but it's cloudy with sprinkles. Anyway have been cooking a lot of Asian dishes lately partly because my kids love Asian foods in general and the husband (a WASP to the core) has been away on a business. Tonight I am thinking of clear vermicelli noodle lettuce wraps and grilled pork cilantro chili patties, with sliced watermelon for dessert. To see pics of what we have been cooking lately check out https://castii.com/c#cast/561
Post yours pics too. It's fun to see what people are cooking. :-)

Jun 16, 2012
mchutch in Home Cooking

Enamelware Baking Pans

Thank you for your post.

Apr 18, 2012
mchutch in Cookware

What to eat for a first-timer to Seattle?

I agree with BuffaloBandit, Madison Park Conservatory is very good at times but sometimes inconsistent. Cormac Mahoney has been getting a lot of press lately, partly because of being named one of the Best New Chefs 2012 by F&W. I second trying the Corson Building. I've done the Sunday Family Style Dinner, it was excellent and I like the funky location under an overpass in Georgetown and the atmosphere in the space. The night we were there a train passed by (slowly) as were having pre-dinner drinks outside on the patio/lawn/chicken coop area. Kind of cool.

Book Bindery is excellent, very clean flavors, wonderful execution of dishes. Atmosphere is a little more stiffer than Madison Park Conservatory or Corson Building but very pleasant. It's across the canal from Revel in Fremont.

Apr 16, 2012
mchutch in Greater Seattle

What to eat for a first-timer to Seattle?

Foodinmouth,

Please see my responses below and they are only my opinions.

Joule: Love the Korean-French fusion. Excellent, love, love, love the spicy beef soup. But sometimes some dishes were an odd fusion. For a more casual atmosphere and riff on Korean comfort food, you might want to try their other restaurant Revel in the neighboring neighborhood of Fremont. Be prepared to wait as there are no reservations.
Dahlia Lounge: Consistent, good, but for me not the first place that comes to mind when going out.
Matt's in the Market was better when Matt owned it but still good. You might want to try Matt's new place Lecosho on the Harbor Steps. Everything pig and more. Just down the ways from Pike Place Market.
Salumi: great for lunch. Porchetta sandwich is a favorite. Open only on weekdays.
Spring Hill: have not tried. They also have changed their format now too.
How to Cook a Wolf: Excellent Italian. Pasta sublime. But be prepared to wait, no reservations.
Anchovies & Olives: Again excellent small plates, fish and antipasti but be prepared to possibly wait, no reservations.
Tavolata: Excellent Italian, some of the best handmade pasta and the best grilled octopus I've had but every time I go there, the food takes so long to come out that I'm ready to curl up on the communal table out of sheer hunger.
Sitka and Spruce Very good, seasonal, regional and fresh but have had some off nights there with the food.
Canlis: Despite having lived here for over 20 years and living really close by, I have never gone. Friends tell me though it's excellent for drinks and the view.
Crush: Been there a couple of times, really good but not exactly memorable to me.
Tilth: Love, love Tilth, fresh, seasonal, organic, and inventive. I've always had excellent meals here. Also, is in my neighborhood so it's an easy walk.
Spur Gastropub: Have not tried, but have tried the Coterie room next door. Too noisy and food was underwhelming.
Paseo: Good Cuban sandwiches, and grilled chicken. Can only go every few of months though, kind of heavy. You should also try Dot's Deli across the street catacorner from them. Excellent sandwiches and house made sausages, pate, duck confit, bacon, etc. The best BLT in the city or ever when heirloom tomatoes are in season.
Walrus & The Carpenter: Be prepared to wait, get your name on the list and just wait till they call you. A party of 4 usually is a 1 hour and 45 minute wait. Actually, I am going there this Thursday. If you love oysters then this is the place, the menu is a bit limited to small plate/ bar food type of things. You might also want to consider Staple & Fancy next door for dinner one night. It's one of my favorite restaurants, especially the family style $45/person menu where you let the chef(s) make whatever is seasonal and fresh that day. You can also tell them your dietary preferences and they will accommodate. There are usually 4 to 5 courses and every time I order this option, it's been excellent. There was one time there was a tagliatelle with mussels and salsa verde that was so sublime.
Skillet Diner: very good better than diner food.
Ray's Boathouse: just skip it. Other than the view outside which is great (go to Canlis for the view or even the Pink Door on the patio if the weather is good at Pike Place Market) , food is bland and tasteless. A kind of geriatric crowd as well.
Lola: OK, but there are better restaurants around.

P.S. Other options to consider:
Cantinetta: A great alternative to the other Italian places on your list. A lovely neighborhood restaurant, with a great atmosphere and food.
Molly Moon: Ice cream in Wallingford or on Queen Anne.
Taylor Shellfish: in the same building as Sitka and Spruce and great oyster bar.
The Dahlia Bakery next to the Dahlia Lounge has wonderful baked goods, soups, sandwiches.
Macrina Bakery Cafe also has wonderful baked goods, soups, sandwiches.

Apr 13, 2012
mchutch in Greater Seattle

Enamelware Baking Pans

Hello,

I just came across some retro looking white enamelware baking pans and a jelly roll pan with blue trim. Has anyone ever used enamelware baking pans before how do they hold up? I've only ever seen the big blue turkey roaster pan and a large lobster pot. Even if they aren't that great for baking, they are so pretty that I am thinking of just getting them for serving platters. Any thoughts or insights would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks!

Apr 13, 2012
mchutch in Cookware

POLL: Can you walk to an actual grocery store?

I live in the Wallingford/Fremont area of Seattle. I can walk to 2 grocery stores within 10 to 15 minutes at a leisurely pace, a QFC in Wallingford or the PCC in Fremont. If I am buying more that fits in tote bag I just bring my rolling grocery tote cart that I brought back from Japan. Being in Seattle, we have a very convenient grocery delivery service from Amazon Fresh which is great as well.

Mar 16, 2012
mchutch in General Topics

Is There Any Commonplace Dish You've Never Eaten?

I've never had sweet potato casserole with marshmallows either. The thought of it makes me uneasy. I think I just have an aversion to most casseroles in general.

I've never eaten a cinnamon roll either. The gooey, sickeningly sweet smell and look of it just does not appeal to me.

Feb 03, 2012
mchutch in General Topics

Is There Any Commonplace Dish You've Never Eaten?

Me too. I've never had a Big Mac.

Feb 03, 2012
mchutch in General Topics

Chinese clay poy cookery

It's a approximately a 3.5 quart sandpot, about 10.5" in diameter and 5" tall and has a domed lid. I attached a photo of what it looks like. When I make no knead bread, I make enough dough to divide the dough in half (usually 1 lb. to 1.5 lb. loaves). I take the one half of dough and gently knead and shape it into a roundish loaf and place it on a sheet of parchment paper for it's final rise. Meanwhile the sandpot is in the oven preheating to 450 F you can go higher to 500 F but I found that in my oven 450 F works better. The parchment helps make cleanup a breeze. The other half of dough goes back into the fridge in a storage container to bake later in the week. Now that I think of it, I suppose I could try roasting a small chicken in the sandpot as another use for it.

Jan 25, 2012
mchutch in Cookware

Chinese clay poy cookery

I use my 2 sandpots, (a larger one and a smaller) for various braised dishes mostly Asian dishes. I often make the SunDuBu Jiggae, a Korean tofu soup that my daughter loves in the smaller one. I did find a great use for the larger sandpot, I use it to make all sorts of No Knead Bread recipes and have had fantastic results. It is sort of like a poor man's baking cloche. I remember picking it up at my local Asian supermarket for $7 many years ago. I figured why risk my expensive and heavy enameled cast iron pot in the super hot oven and I do have the Le Creuset metal knob too.

Jan 25, 2012
mchutch in Cookware

Seattle Trip - Must Eats!

Here are some personal favorites to take foodie friends or IMHO anyone who likes just eating really good food.
1. Dinner at: Staple and Fancy mercantile in historic Ballard, a short cab ride from downtown. We usually opt for the family style chef's menu just tell the waitperson any personal dislikes or allergies and they will accommodate. Just let the chef(s) decide based on what's seasonal and refional. Truly excellent. http://ethanstowellrestaurants.com/st...
Reservations are highly recommended but you could try to snag seats at the bar if you don't have reservations.
2. The Walrus and Carpenter behind Staple and Fancy for drinks and oysters and or a light dinner. No reservations so be prepared for a potential long wait. http://thewalrusbar.com/
3. Dinner/Happy Hour (sort of): Art of the Table in Wallingford (short cab or bus ride from downtown). They have a small plates Monday and Thursday with everything is of course seasonal and regional. Dishes are inventive and delicious. House cured charcuterie is excellent. They have a more set supper club dinner on Fridays and Saturdays. http://artofthetable.net/
4. Dinner or brunch at Tilth in Wallingford. I love it because it's in my neighborhood and I love the food. Frank Bruni also likes Tilth too. http://www.tilthrestaurant.com/home
5. Lunch/Dinner Revel in Fremont (short cab ride or bus ride). Refreshing take on Korean Comfort food. short rib bibimbap is a personal favorite. http://www.revelseattle.com/
6. Lecosho downtown on the Harbor Steps. Everything pork and more, need I say more.
http://lecosho.com/#
7. Lunch: Salumi in Pioneer Square.
8. Happy Hour and Late night: Showa in Fremont. Izakaya with a twist.
http://www.showafremont.com/
There are so many other excellent places here but those listed are just on my shortlist of favorites.
Other favorites:
Sitka and Spruce, Anchovies and Olives, The Corson Building, The Boat Street Cafe, How to Cook a Wolf, Marjorie, Poppy, Monsoon (Modern Vietnamese), The Kingfish Cafe (soul/southern food), Baguette Box (a little walk up from downtown on Capitol Hill), Quinn's (great for late night eating up on Capitol Hill from downtown.
Hope you enjoy your stay here and the great food available.

-----
Boat Street Cafe
909 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA

Baguette Box
1203 Pine St, Seattle, WA 98101

Salumi
309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

Art of the Table
1054 N 39th St, Seattle, WA 98103

The Corson Building
5609 Corson Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108

Nov 21, 2011
mchutch in Greater Seattle

Solo Dining Recommendations?

Hi,

Will be in Chicago next week for a couple days for a conference, will have time for dinner one night and maybe a second night. I need some recommendations for dining solo. I have been to Avec and sat at the counter and really liked the atmosphere and the food. I was thinking of trying Publican this time around but am open any other recommendations for solo dining?

Thanks,

Mary from Seattle

Sep 11, 2009
mchutch in Chicago Area

Quinns or Lark - for tonight! help

Try the Corson Building if you can get a reservation.

Sep 04, 2009
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

Seattle October 22 – 26

Mary,
Sound like you have done a lot of research. Quinn's is great for late night. Matt's definitely for lunch, every time I've eaten at Elliott's it's been meh. No to Lola, greasy and dry. ZigZag a definite for drinks. Bastille, OK in Ballard. If you do wander at dinner time to Fremont from Ballard you might want to try Chiso for sushi or the omakase at Kappo. If you want homey Italian food, Tavolata (though wait for food is quite long) or How to Cook a Wolf (top of Queen Anne) are excellent. Also if you don't mind taking a cab a special treat is the Corson Building in Georgetown. The menu is set and dinner is served family style. My personal faves are Tilth (Maria Hines just won the James Beard Award) and Art of the Table but then again both are in my neighborhood and within walking distance for me. Crush was overrated, bland fish but I may have to give them another try if the occasion arrises. Poppy is interesting, have been there twice, but there was always at least one item on the thali plate that tasted weird but such is the nature of a thali. Another option for lunch that is right near your hotel, believe it or not is Taste, the cafe at the SAM (Seattle Art Museum). I had a sublime cauliflower soup. They also serve breakfast and lunch. Enjoy your time in Seattle.
From another Mary in Seattle

Sep 02, 2009
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

need help on name of vegetable

From your description, I think it may be called Amaranth in English. It's one of the few dark green leafy vegetables that is spinach like but can be slimy when cooked. I sometimes see it here at the farmer's market sold by Hmong farmers. Sometime they have reddish stems. My mother used to stir fry it with eggs.

May 16, 2008
mchutch in Home Cooking

Teatro Zinzanni

Food is OK not great. The entertainment was much better it depends on your taste. My husband was not really into it but my brother and I thought it was great. Pricey though, worth seeing once but not twice.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

visiting SEATTLE any SUSHI recs?

Shiro's is good for downtown. A short cab ride to Fremont would be Kappo but a reservation is a must as seating is very limited. Chiso is also a good alternative downstairs.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

Dinner for 6 in Seattle

Veil has a communal table that may work for 6 people. Also had dinner at Brasa for a party of 6 and it was great too.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

Art of the Table (SEA)

It is really small but it's never been too crowded when I've been there. It's pretty quiet and low key. Never a line waiting outside.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

Art of the Table (SEA)

I live 3 blocks away from it and it's excellent though the set menu is limited so you have to like what's featured that week. But you can check it out beforehand on their website.
They have a Happy Hour Wine tasting on Mondays from 5 to 8 pm where they test out bites.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest

going to seattle for the first time

You must go to Tilth in the Wallingford section of Seattle. It's not touristy at all and the food is excellent and organic or naturally sourced. We have been going there since it opened as it is in our neighborhood. It also recently got ranked #9 by Frank Bruni for the top ten restaurants in the U.S. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/27/din...
Happy Eating.

Apr 24, 2008
mchutch in Pacific Northwest