d

dkennedy's Profile

Title Last Reply

Cooking first time for girlfriend. Help!

It sounds like your lap band requires that you only eat 1/2 cup of food at a meal. That is rather small if you are serving burgers. Seafood is great on the grill and it would allow you to make her a bigger portion while still eating within your guidelines.

Calamari is wonderful grilled and very healthy. Pretty much pure protein. It would make a wonderful first course or a main dish served over a salad.

How accomplished of a cook are you? You could wash and prep your salad components before she gets there and make up a vinaigrette the night before. Then all you would need to do is grill and assemble.

If you are up for multi courses, you could wrap some thinly sliced melon in proscuitto, serve that with Prosecco or whatever white wine she prefers.

Then move onto the grill. Maybe grill some citrus glazed shrimp. Serve it with a dipping sauce.

Fish en papillote can be assembled early in the day and popped in a pre-heated oven just before eating.

It this sounds up your alley, let me know and I'll compile a few recipes for you to look over.

about 11 hours ago
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Grass fed and finished meat, organs, pastured eggs etc?

In terms of the the meat and organ aspect of your request, there is a new butcher shop in the Central Market, Downtown L.A that meets your criteria.

Here is a link:

http://www.belcampomeatco.com

about 12 hours ago
dkennedy in Los Angeles Area

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

Wow, Yucatan looks amazing. Please report back after you have had a chance to work with it. I had a very disappointing cookbook day. I came home to find a package on my door step. When I opened it, I found that the vendor (used, on Amazon) sent me the wrong book. I ordered The Cheesemonger's Seasons. They sent me The Cheesemonger's Kitchen. Now I have to wait for them to refund it before I can reorder. Frustrating! I was so looking forward to spending time with it this weekend.

about 22 hours ago
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Vote for May Cookbook of the Month

I really hope My Bombay Kitchen wins so I'll have an excuse to add it to my shelves!

Apr 17, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

The entire menu was super yummy. The cardamom cake really being the highlight of the meal. Looking forward to getting my hands on the book.

Apr 16, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking
1

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

Thank you!

Apr 15, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

That's too bad. Do you have a congregation nearby that can hook you up? Our seder will be very low key. A glance at the prayer books, if you will. Mostly just eating and hopefully good conversation...

Apr 15, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

The cardamom cake out of My Bombay Kitchen. Someone mentioned the recipe upthread so I googled it and found that someone has blogged about it (naturally) so I thought I'd give it a go.

I am having an Indian themed Passover seder this year: Indian chicken matzoh ball soup inspired by (One Spice, Two Spice); chickpea fritters with cucumber yogurt sauce, (same book); lamb shanks ala Jamie Oliver, and cardamom cake with star anise spiced poached pears. Not exactly traditional, but it keeps me inspired. Will report back.

Apr 15, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

I am going to make the Cardamom cake tonight and it comes out,it will be part of my Passover spread (modifying to be gluten and leven free, of course).

Apr 15, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

These are some great recommendations, thx for the leg work!

Apr 14, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

April 2014 Cookbook of the Month - Pok Pok: Food and Stories from the Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand by Andy Ricker, JJ Goode, and David Thompson

Yes, that is my thought as well. How many mortar and pestles does one person need?

Apr 13, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

April 2014 Cookbook of the Month - Pok Pok: Food and Stories from the Streets, Homes, and Roadside Restaurants of Thailand by Andy Ricker, JJ Goode, and David Thompson

I was at my hair dresser's on Friday so I finally had a good amount of time to devote to this book. Started with the forward and read straight through the rice chapter. I am glad to have discovered this book, as it is very well researched and written, and because I find Andy Ricker to be a kindred spirit. I will be traveling to Portland this summer, and Pok Pok will definitely be one of my first stops.

I am wondering if any of you have in your home either of the two mortar and pestles he recommends? I have a stone mortar and pestle I inherited from my grandmother, and I use it for everything. Do I really need these other kinds for Thai cuisine? I would love to hear your thoughts.

Still in the process of gearing up to cook out of this book. I am sure I will, it just may not be before the end of the month. I am also wrestling with whether or not to buy this book or David Thompson's tome. I have always wanted David Thompson's, as it is such an impressive piece of work, but I rarely choose to make Thai food at home, so I don't own it copy - yet. I was hoping Pok Pok would motivate me to run right out and stock my pantry, but it hasn't yet.

Right now, an Artisan cutting board is diverting my attention. I am trying to figure out how to rationalize such an extravagant purchase. I will use it every day and it will bring me joy everyday when I come into the kitchen and see it on my counter, but I don't need it. What to do, what to do?

Apr 13, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

I just placed holds on two books from the library. The first, The New Persian Kitchen, seems to be generating a lot of interest. The second, My Bombay Kitchen, seems more my speed. It has wonderful reviews and that cake is calling my name. It looks like they will both make it to the run offs this time. I am anxious to get my hand on them so I can make a proper decision come voting time.

MY BOMBAY KITCHEN

Apr 13, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

Do you already own Polpo? It's on my list.

Apr 12, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking
1

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Re duck stock, I would imagine just like chicken but to be honest, I have never done it. I would look in your EYB index to find a recipe. Re the breasts, you can confit them as well. They will be delicious. I am not sure if I would refreeze them unless they were thoroughly cooked first.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Here is my recipe or technique for making duck confit at home. It is not as drawn out as the true confit technique, but in my opinion, it yields the same delicious results and at a fraction of the time/monetary investment.

Start with as many legs you want to confit. I usually make 2 legs at a time because it is really just intended for one meal or so. With duck legs being so hard to come by and so expensive, I am rarely in a position to make more. I was lucky this past week and got 7 legs for $35 (a steal around here) so I made 4 legs. We will each get our own tonight, a real treat. But I digress...

Blot dry and rub all over with plenty of course grey salt, pepper, fresh thyme, and whatever other spices you want. Allow to sit at room temperature to draw out the moisture for at least an hour. If you have time, you could do this on a plate in your fridge, just don't cover it. If you do it in the fridge, I would say leave it at least overnight. Then bring to room temp before proceeding.

When they come to room temperature, use the tip of a paring knife to pierce the fat all over. Try not to pierce the meat itself. Sometimes it is easier to pierce the fat when it is cold. Try both ways.

Find a heavy bottom pan that will fit the legs snugly in a single layer. I use a small le crueset fry pan. Warm the duck fat or olive oil over low heat until quite hot, but not hot enough to sizzle when you add the duck. Slowly slip the dug legs into the pan, taking care not to splash yourself with the oil. I do this on the back burner of the stove so I can tend to it easily as I continue with my other jobs.

Oh I forgot - the salt. Some would tell you to brush the salt off the legs before putting them in the pan. This is a matter of debate. I leave my seasoning on and allow it to season the oil. It is going to be in there for quite some time and there is a lot of oil. Again, your choice.

Add 2 bay leaves and several more sprigs of thyme to the oil. The oil should be at a temp that this does not cause it to sputter. Add a few shallots that have been halved, and a few cloves garlic, both with their skins on.

Leave on the stove top for as long as you have. Several hours, turning them from time to time. If your skin remains plump you probably need to pierce it some more. The more you pierce it, the more it will render and become crisp.

When the meat becomes meltingly tender and pulling away from the bone, confit is done. You can now store it in the fridge, submerged in the fat, for several weeks.

If you don't have enough fat, you can add olive oil to cover. Or you can freeze in partially submerged fashion and it should hold at least 3 months.

When ready to serve you can rewarm the duck in the oil or just pull out the leg you want to heat. Either way, be sure to allow the leg you are serving to go back into a dry pan at a medium high temperature to allow the skin to crisp. Then serve anyway you like.

My favorite way is on a salad with lardons, runny egg, radishes, and sweet 100 tomatoes. Drizzle some of the duck fat over the greens and you are good to go. Adding some crispy roasted new potatoes is also nice if you have some on hand.

Other things to note: The duck fat can be reused for the same purpose multiple times. Jut strain out the seasoning. Strained, it will hold in your freezer for at least 6 months.

If necessary, you can cook the confit in stages. So for e.g., let's say you don't have several hours to devote to this. Start the confit and cook for 1 hour one night. Then, allow to come to room temp before storing it in fridge. Next morning, or evening, or both, repeat the process until done.

Note that if you refrigerate your confit the meat will firm back up. Once you rewarm it, the meltingly tender consistency will come back.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking
2

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

I do NOT think you could substitute coconut oil with good results. If you don't have access to rendered duck fat or goose fat, I would use olive oil. Once your duck starts to render its own fat, it will marry with the olive oil and the resulting fat will be good enough to drink, or at least, cook with! The carcasses will make amazing stock or you can add them to your next braise for a little extra something something. I'll post my method later.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking
1

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Yes, always from scratch and it is easy. I'll post a fool proof recipe anyone, really anyone, can do without worrying about the results.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Duck confit is so easy as long as you are home for a good amount of time. I almost always have some in the freezer for nights when it is just me. A little goes a long way when served over a salad, lentils, braised greens. It's a perfect pantry meal. Duck legs can be hard to find around here but recently we had had a flurry of butcher shops open up. I picked up pastured legs for around $5 a piece the other day so I have confit in the fridge and 3 more legs in the freezer for another occasion. And I found quail eggs at the farmers market so I am thinking it might be nice to poach and crack over the top tonight.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

I have the brisket book. It is a great read but a month of brisket? I am not sure I could get behind that. Maybe paired with another book? Or a side thread?

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Are you in LA herby? You are welcome to come to dinner anytime.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Your very kind! It's not as glamorous as it sounds, I promise.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

COTM (Cookbook of the Month) Recipes So Good You've Made Them at Least Three Times: Quick and Easy/Weeknight Edition

Me too. My menu planning this past weekend was better than usual. Dinner was Monday: Radically Simple's nigella seed salad, Tuesday:Suzanne Goin's fried chicken, Wednesday: Rick Bayless' enchiladas, Thursday (back to school night) El Pollo Loco, Tonight: duck confit over lentils.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

Everything I have made has been wonderful. The meatballs are outstanding, My family would eat them every night if I would make them. The bee hive is great. But it is the kind of thing to make when you have guests coming over. The tomato jam (not sure if that is what it is called) is also wonderful. Makes a great hostess gift. The ricotta fritters are to die for and the baked apple is also amazing. My friend made the savory tart and I remember thinking it was too rich for my taste, but I don't eat a lot of pastry so.....Also, I think there is a salad in there using Roscamador cheese - I know I spelled that wrong, btw, but I am not near my book, it is very good too.

Apr 11, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

THE CHEESEMONGER'S SEASONS by Chester Hastinngs.

I have his first book, The Cheesemonger's Kitchen, and I absolutely love it. I am told this one is more veggie centric, which really appeals to me. Full review when the book arrives.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

I don't own it, but I have heard good things about it so I will jump on the PATI'S MEXICAN TABLE bandwagon. The others are just not calling out to me

I just sent Smitten Kitchen back to the library. I mentioned it last nomination go round, no one seemed interested. But it would easy to cook out of. Lots of approachable recipes.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking
1

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

Very sad! If you have an iPad or any other variation they all have kindle apps.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

Hi Westminstress,

This will be a good exercise for me to see if I can apply the info I am reading. Here is what it tells me about London broil:

“Next comes the ROUND, again one of the largest portions of the cow. It comprises the entire upper leg. This primal ends just above the shin or shank, and it’s a lean and slightly tough portion of the cow. There are four subprimals: the sirloin tip, the top round, bottom round, and the eye round. The sirloin tip is the source of roasts: for steaks it’s known for minute steak and sirloin tip steak. These cuts can further be cut into kebobs, London broil another name for sirloin tip steak, which like all sirloin tip steak is cut against the grain; London broils are usually marinated... Top round can also be a London broil…”

Re cooking grass fed beef in general: “Add salt in the form of a rub or in the pan as it cooks but not in a marinade…. Use a meat thermometer, pull out 10 degrees less than ideal and let rest for 15 minutes….cook braises at an extremely low temperature to break down the meat…”

Re cooking the round specifically: Dived into top, bottom, sirloin tip and eye of round, this portion of the cow offers a wide mix of steaks and or oven roasts as wsll as stew meat and pot roasts…while London broil’s open texture absorbs flavorful marinades to provide a tasty and tender mouthfeel when cut on the bias….

Recipe #1: London broil (from the beef chuck shoulder steak) p. 77 This is curious because I went back and reread the section on the shoulder and found no mention of the London Broil. But since this is for a shoulder London broil, not one from the leg, it will by definition be more tender.
Instructions:
Marinate for as little as 2 ours or as long a overnight. Bring to room temp before cooking. Marinade: garlic rosemary, lemon zest, olive oil and red wine sherry vinegar (note no salt in marinade). Blot dry, Season pan with course sea salt. Then, sear over high heat for about 5 minutes. Turn over, cook for 5 more. Let rest for 10 - 15 minutes. Cut against grain.

Recipe #2: Red Barn Spiced Eye of Round Roast with Beer Sauce, p. 101
This does not specify is for a London broil but it makes sense that it will work on any roast from the round, which this is. Calls for applying a dry rub all over and let meat sit at room temp for 1 hour. Heat oven to 350. Use a small pan that fits the roast as closely as possible. Roast fat side up for 20 minutes. Raise temp to 425 for 15 additional minutes or until internal temp is 130 degrees. Rest for 15 minutes. Deglaze pan with 1 bottle beer, along with juices and another T. of spice rub. Boil sauce over high heat for15 minutes to reduce by 1/2 (approx 1 - 1 1/4 c.). Off heat, whisk in 2 T. heavy cream. Cut against grain, nap with sauce.

She notes that when meat is lightly salted before cooking it seems to incorporate the salt flavor into the meat, rather than leaving it on the surface. Salt in the spice rub promotes flavor and brings out he inherent sweetness in the dish. Her is the spice rub called for above:
1 T. salt (grey salt)
2 T. sugar
2 t. sweet pimeton de la vera (aka smoked paprika)
1 T. gound coriander
1 T. ground ancho chile
1 T. ground ginger

Yields 7 Tbsps.

Recipes #3: (Marinated Bottom Round), p. 102, I am not posting this recipe since it is for the bottom round

Recipe #4: Beef Round Sirloin Tip Roast, p. 103
The recipe notes “Don’t be fooled by the sirloin reference in the name of this cut; this is a part of the round, a working muscle that generally offers more flavor than tenderness. Nevertheless, this end of the round (also known as the knuckle) makes an outstanding roast beef, esp. when rubbed with salt and spice cure (p.30) cooked in this high low fashion and then sliced thinly. The probe thermometer is especially helpful here."

2 1/2 lb. grass fed beef round sirloin tip roast
1 onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, mashed
1/4 c. Salt and Spice Cure, see p. 30
1 T. evoo
1/2 c. red wine
1 T. butter, cream or creme fraiche
s and p to taste

Instructions: Bring meat to room temp and blot dry. In a food processor, process onions , garlic, cure seasonings and oil, into a paste. Rub on meat and let sit at room temp for 1 hour before rolling it and tying roast. Heat oven to 425, convection setting if possible. Roll and tie roast evenly. Lay it in a pan similar in size to roast, the smaller the better. You want a snug fit. Place roast in pan seam side down. Roast without disturbing for 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 375 for another 12-15 minutes. Pull out when internal temp hits 130. Let rest for 15 minutes before carving. Try not to open the oven during cooking time. While resting, make a pan sauce with the red wine, pan juices, and reduce. Add butter or cream and immediately remove from heat. Season as desired. Slice thinly and drizzle with sauce.

Salt and Spice Cure:

1 T. fennel pollen or fennel seeds ground up
1 T. cumin seeds,
1 t. coriander seeds
1/2 t. black Tellicherry peppercorns
1 star anise
1/2 cinnamon stick
1 whole clove
1 T. sea salt
2 T. sugar

Grind in spice grinder. Yields 7 Tbsp.

ETA: I'd be interested to hear how these methods differ from what you usually do.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

Nominations for May 2014 Cookbook of the Month (COTM)

Thank you MeiMM, very helpful.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking

What cookbooks have you bought recently, or are you lusting after? April 2014 edition!

So, my copy of Good Meat arrived and I have to say, I am loving it. It is the first book since Zuni I have felt the need to go through and underline because there is so much useful information in it that it is overwhelming. This way, I will know where to refer back without rereading the entire book.

My first perusal from the library did not really prepare me for how fantastic a resource this book is going to be. I already touched on it being a guide for understanding more about grass fed beef and pastured poultry, lamb and pork. But now that I have had a chance to review the recipes and pantry sections, I realize they are going to be invaluable as well.

To be fair, I'm only through the beef section, but, already, wow! She explains the whys and hows about cooking grass fed beef. Not just one paragraph. A paragraph on each cut of beef, and then several recipes for pretty much each cut. Recipes that will work for grass fed beef where your traditional recipes may have failed you.

For ex., I recently made grass fed burgers and they came out tough which was very disappointing. She explained why (you have to either sear quickly and leave them rare inside or cook them at a much lower temperature than you would expect if you want them cooked through but not tough), she also advises about seasoning, how and when and why this needs modifying, etc.

I can't wait to finish this book, cover to cover, so I can ensure I am not making mistakes. Right now I have only a few pieces of grass fed beef in my freezer but I am anxious to see if her tips make a difference.

Apr 10, 2014
dkennedy in Home Cooking